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Old 10-15-2016, 09:10 PM
Spoke Spoke is offline
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Identify this antique wooden household object

This object was found among my elderly aunt's things when she passed away a few years back. It is carved wood, about 6 inches end-to-end. I have it in my head that I have seen an object like this before, and that it has some useful function, but I can't call it to mind.

I believe it came from my granparents' home. They set up housekeeping in a nice house on a dairy farm in northwest Georgia in 1912 or thereabouts, and mantained the household through the 1960s.

It is possible, of course, that the object could be still older, passed down from an earlier family member.

I think this is either a kitchen item or came from my grandfather's desk where he conducted his business affairs. Those are the two places I feel like I might have seen it before.

Any ideas?
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  #2  
Old 10-15-2016, 10:55 PM
burpo the wonder mutt burpo the wonder mutt is offline
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Completely insane WAG: A door pull? Before latching knobs were invented?

No, I'm not drunk!

Last edited by burpo the wonder mutt; 10-15-2016 at 10:55 PM.
  #3  
Old 10-15-2016, 11:03 PM
MLS MLS is offline
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Is it one solid piece, or does it come apart?

I doubt if it's a kitchen tool, since it has such a shiny finish.
  #4  
Old 10-15-2016, 11:09 PM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
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If the two sides can be separated, they might be decorative finials. But as it is, I don't see how it would be useful.
  #5  
Old 10-15-2016, 11:13 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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It looks to me like a doorknob, possibly for a cafe door.
  #6  
Old 10-15-2016, 11:20 PM
Francis Vaughan Francis Vaughan is offline
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Finial would be my call as well.
  #7  
Old 10-15-2016, 11:47 PM
guestchaz guestchaz is offline
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It does look like a couple of finials attached to each other, but my first thought was a "something" bob for use with textiles, yarn specifically. Not a spindle per se, but maybe something used in conjunction with spinning or weaving. Argh! I've seen one of these or something very similar once before and its just right. there. just. out. of. reach. of. recall!
  #8  
Old 10-15-2016, 11:59 PM
Joey P Joey P is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey Finn View Post
If the two sides can be separated, they might be decorative finials. But as it is, I don't see how it would be useful.
I was actually thinking newal posts caps, but again, as it looks, that doesn't make sense unless it was specifically made for a certain spot in one house.

However, before you put too much thought into it, keep in mind that someone could have just been playing with a new lathe. Made one...whatever it is, then had enough extra stock left over to make it again on the other side without having to reset everything and 100 years later confused heirs are trying to figure out what it was used for.
  #9  
Old 10-16-2016, 12:42 AM
Sunny Daze Sunny Daze is offline
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Did she bake? It is shiny, but it looks like the sort of thing that folks used to use to roll along the edge of pastry crusts.
  #10  
Old 10-16-2016, 01:03 AM
brossa brossa is offline
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What stands out to me is that the 'acorns' on either end are so nicely smoothed and finished, while the center section seems rough and unfinished - if not the very middle, then certainly the bits connecting the acorns to the middle. It's maybe not even rounded off there?

Because such a different amount of care went into the different areas, I suspect that the piece was not meant to be a single unified object. I propose that the acorns were meant to be cut off and used for some other purpose: finial, knob, ornament, what have you. You're looking at parts still on the sprue, as it were.
  #11  
Old 10-16-2016, 01:34 AM
Francis Vaughan Francis Vaughan is offline
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I'm going to go out of a limb here.

The design appears to be intended to be incorporated into another component. The fact that the centre square bit is also finished the same as the ends. It suggests to me, not so much an actual finial as a component in balustrade or similar structure. Now the fact that the thing has been kept suggests some value to the owner. So, here is the far out thought. It is part of a Rood Screen. There was a habit of cutting the original screens down to a lower size, and this may have freed up components for members of the congregation to souvenir. Was your aunt of British church going stock - and may have had this passed down?
  #12  
Old 10-16-2016, 01:56 AM
TruCelt TruCelt is offline
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It could be used for shaping or darning socks. But then, one would think it would be scratched up from use.

It certainly does look like a latchless doorknob set, but the pointy bits are weird for that.
  #13  
Old 10-16-2016, 02:05 AM
Derleth Derleth is offline
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Originally Posted by TruCelt View Post
It could be used for shaping or darning socks. But then, one would think it would be scratched up from use.
I thought that for a second, too, but aren't those usually mushrooms, and a lot rounder? Those acorn things are pointy.
  #14  
Old 10-16-2016, 02:54 AM
PatrickLondon PatrickLondon is online now
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I'd go with the idea of it being something to with textiles or yarn. Possibly something you would drape a skein of wool over for one person to hold (with the "finials") while someone else drew off the wool to wind it into a ball? Rather a fancy way to do what can be done with someone's bare hands, or just two chairs back to back without anyone holding the wool, but maybe some proud husband said "Look what I've made out of that old [piece of unwanted furniture]!" and a wife humoured him..........
  #15  
Old 10-16-2016, 03:58 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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Do the acorns actually come out of their cups? I've seen pocket sewing kits where the acorn wa actually hollow, but never back to back like this though.

But it does have the look of an unfinished piece or demolition souvenir.
  #16  
Old 10-16-2016, 05:27 AM
PatrickLondon PatrickLondon is online now
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It does rather look as though the central elements fixing them together are a bit more amateurish and uneven, so they might be cobbled together from something else, but for what purpose?

There are plenty of images of spinning wheels that seem to have finials at the end of various handles. But equally, you could imagine the finials on this as coming from some over-elaborate item of 19th-century furniture, say, a Jacobethan-style chair or sideboard.
  #17  
Old 10-16-2016, 07:37 AM
Spoke Spoke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey P View Post
However, before you put too much thought into it, keep in mind that someone could have just been playing with a new lathe. Made one...whatever it is, then had enough extra stock left over to make it again on the other side without having to reset everything and 100 years later confused heirs are trying to figure out what it was used for.
I think I may have come to that conclusion. This could have been produced by one of my uncles playing around with a lathe. Maybe they gave it to my aunt and she kept it for sentimental reasons.

On the other hand, like guestchaz, I have the nagging feeling I've seen something like this before.

To answer questions:

This is one single, solid piece.

My Aunt was not of "British church-going stock." She was United Methodist, and our family has been in the South for hundreds of years.

Last edited by Spoke; 10-16-2016 at 07:37 AM.
  #18  
Old 10-16-2016, 07:45 AM
Spoke Spoke is offline
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Originally Posted by brossa View Post
Because such a different amount of care went into the different areas, I suspect that the piece was not meant to be a single unified object. I propose that the acorns were meant to be cut off and used for some other purpose: finial, knob, ornament, what have you. You're looking at parts still on the sprue, as it were.
That occurred to me, too, but why finish them before cutting them off?
  #19  
Old 10-16-2016, 08:43 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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OP, does the thing have a nice "heft" to it, when you pick it up and handle it? Sometimes things feel so comforting in one's hands, that they are kept even they are of no other value. So it might be a practice or defective finial made in a home shop, that felt so good to someone they decided to pass it around, and family members liked it so much that someone even finished it. The thing has enough nicks in the finish that it might have even spent some time in a child's toybox.

My neighbor keeps a latch handle from the rear hatch of a Dodge Caravan on her porch, which visitors love to play with. It has a heft of lift and movement that is pleasing. The only part of the Dodge that escaped the crusher.

Last edited by jtur88; 10-16-2016 at 08:46 AM.
  #20  
Old 10-16-2016, 08:46 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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I remember making a bunch of little random wooden things (mine were carved with a penknife) when I was a kid and giving them to my grandmother, who proudly displayed them in her curio cabinet - they were still there twenty years later when she died, and I imagine whoever disposed of her belongings might have puzzled over them a little, as they were not at all useful.

I reckon that must happen quite a lot - proud parents, grandparents, uncles and aunts hanging on to little Timmy's first bit of carving, woodturning or metalwork.

This might not be that, but it sort of looks like it could be.
  #21  
Old 10-16-2016, 09:40 AM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey P View Post
However, before you put too much thought into it, keep in mind that someone could have just been playing with a new lathe. Made one...whatever it is, then had enough extra stock left over to make it again on the other side without having to reset everything and 100 years later confused heirs are trying to figure out what it was used for.
If it was just someone playing around with a lathe, would you leave the middle part squared off? I would think it would introduce a slight wobble to the workpiece and so you'd knock off the corners almost immediately.

And if you were making two of the same pieces on a lathe, would you mirror image them like that or would you have the two pieces facing the same direction?
  #22  
Old 10-16-2016, 10:04 AM
Tired and Cranky Tired and Cranky is offline
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I don't know what it is but I think I've seen something like that in an antique store. If I'm right, it's not unique.

I think the center section was left square so it wouldn't roll away when it's set down. That tells me that it's a useful tool.
  #23  
Old 10-16-2016, 10:36 AM
burpo the wonder mutt burpo the wonder mutt is offline
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Kite-string holder (the acorns spin in your hands)

Last edited by burpo the wonder mutt; 10-16-2016 at 10:36 AM.
  #24  
Old 10-16-2016, 02:07 PM
Elemenopy Elemenopy is offline
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I think it's either a piece of carving that fell off the top of a headboard or something -- I have a bed very similar to this and pieces like the one you depicted keep falling off of it.

My second guess is some sort of fancy weaving shuttle. I see others were of the same mind.

Try the What is this thing? forum on Reddit; they figure out EVERYTHING!
  #25  
Old 10-16-2016, 02:43 PM
puzzlegal puzzlegal is offline
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Looks ornamental to me. And acorns are only smooth on the part that is smooth. The caps of acorns are rough.
  #26  
Old 10-16-2016, 04:35 PM
Kedikat Kedikat is offline
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Seems like a tool.
The two smooth polished ends being the important parts. The center portion after the ridges being less important. The square center, so your tool does not always roll away.
Maybe you used it to align two pieces. Hold them so as you did something to them. Or it kept them apart but under control. A spreader.
Not very worn or scratched. So used with cloth? Or something soft. A temporary plug between two tubes? Just tossing out ideas to see if it triggers more ideas.
  #27  
Old 10-16-2016, 05:08 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Definitely not a tool. You wouldn't have that sort of finish on any sort of working surface, and the shape clearly has "looks like an acorn" as the primary design consideration, not secondary to some practical use. Plus, it looks like it'd be pretty fragile at the unfinished stems.

It's something decorative. I'm wavering between a decorative piece that came off a piece of furniture, or just the result of someone idly fiddling around with a lathe. I think I lean towards the latter: The OP says it's all carved from one piece of wood, and there's no practical reason at all to do that, since whatever it's for, it'd be easier to make it out of separate pieces.
  #28  
Old 10-16-2016, 05:17 PM
Kedikat Kedikat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
Definitely not a tool. You wouldn't have that sort of finish on any sort of working surface, and the shape clearly has "looks like an acorn" as the primary design consideration, not secondary to some practical use. Plus, it looks like it'd be pretty fragile at the unfinished stems.

It's something decorative. I'm wavering between a decorative piece that came off a piece of furniture, or just the result of someone idly fiddling around with a lathe. I think I lean towards the latter: The OP says it's all carved from one piece of wood, and there's no practical reason at all to do that, since whatever it's for, it'd be easier to make it out of separate pieces.
You would have a smooth finish if the material could snag. It could also be polished from the work itself. If it is decorative, it is not a well finished decoration. The grain runs end to end. So it would not be too weak.
  #29  
Old 10-16-2016, 05:36 PM
quiltguy quiltguy is offline
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Holder for a pair of eyeglasses?
  #30  
Old 10-16-2016, 05:58 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Perhaps I didn't make myself clear enough: A tool could certainly be polished through use. But it looks like that object has had some sort of glossy substance added to its surface, varnish or the like, to finish it, and that doesn't seem likely for a tool. For a tool, you'd at most oil it, which wouldn't look that glossy.
  #31  
Old 10-16-2016, 06:07 PM
Kedikat Kedikat is offline
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Perhaps I didn't make myself clear enough: A tool could certainly be polished through use. But it looks like that object has had some sort of glossy substance added to its surface, varnish or the like, to finish it, and that doesn't seem likely for a tool. For a tool, you'd at most oil it, which wouldn't look that glossy.
I do suspect it is a decorative piece. Though somewhat crude. But sure as the Sun orbits the Earth. First impressions can be wrong. My post was obviously worded to convey uncertainty. Just alternative possibilities. Tools can be decorative as well.
  #32  
Old 10-16-2016, 06:11 PM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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And if you were making two of the same pieces on a lathe, would you mirror image them like that or would you have the two pieces facing the same direction?
You might make them back to back like that - the pointed ends make it easier to get the parting tool in.
  #33  
Old 10-16-2016, 06:39 PM
purplehearingaid purplehearingaid is offline
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Originally Posted by guestchaz View Post
It does look like a couple of finials attached to each other, but my first thought was a "something" bob for use with textiles, yarn specifically. Not a spindle per se, but maybe something used in conjunction with spinning or weaving. Argh! I've seen one of these or something very similar once before and its just right. there. just. out. of. reach. of. recall!
I was thinking this too! Maybe it for knitting woolen socks ???
  #34  
Old 10-16-2016, 08:04 PM
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The object is not worn smooth from use. It has some sort of finish on it.

My aunt had no children, so it's not some object her child produced. Could possibly have been produced by one of her brothers when they were growing up in the 1920s-30s.
  #35  
Old 10-16-2016, 08:13 PM
Francis Vaughan Francis Vaughan is offline
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My Aunt was not of "British church-going stock." She was United Methodist, and our family has been in the South for hundreds of years.
Actually that was precisely the sort of thing I was thinking of. Methodist lineage going back a very long way. A modern Methodist chapel is the last place you would find a Rood Screen, but back at the start when the overlap between CoE and Methodist was greater, I can imagine a forbearer taking something just like that as a memento.

I am going off down a deep rabbit hole here. Get it carbon dated and we can discuss some more
  #36  
Old 10-16-2016, 08:21 PM
Bear_Nenno Bear_Nenno is offline
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Lace bobbin? It looks like a combination of these two things:
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com...0ec63ff29c.jpg
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com...25b9033d9b.jpg
  #37  
Old 10-16-2016, 10:10 PM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is online now
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Here's a similar double ended acorn. It's a needle case, apparently.

Here's another.

also a similar object

and this:

Try seeing if the acorns unscrew.
  #38  
Old 10-16-2016, 10:24 PM
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
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Since it came from a desk, I'm guessing it was either a couple of lace bobbins or newel posts that were repurposed for rolling over pages turned over an ink blotter, back when people wrote with ink that needed to be blotted, which wasn't that long ago, because even in the days of electric typewriters, there were many types of letters which decorum dictated should be handwritten.

My grandmother used a child's toy rolling pin for this purpose, until my mother claimed her old toy for me when I was about three, so my grandmother used it for about 24 years. If anyone had found it, I'm sure they would have wondered why my grandmother had a tiny rolling pin in her desk.
  #39  
Old 10-16-2016, 11:17 PM
Francis Vaughan Francis Vaughan is offline
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What would help is a couple more pics. One with something to allow scaling it would be very useful. The suggestions provided so far range across a large set of possible sizes for the object. Also, a picture of the gap where there is roughly cut wood and no finish. So we can see the side of the square middle component and the edge of the finish on the middle square component.

I suspect the finish was applied after the object was assembled into a larger thing. Judging by the edge of the square bit it looks as if there may have been some trimming done just before fitting as well. The nature of the edge and the finish would give clues about the order of manufacture and its relationship with other bits.

It seems very unlikely, given the rough nature and lack of finish on the two central connection parts that this was a standalone object. It was part of a greater whole.
  #40  
Old 10-16-2016, 11:39 PM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is online now
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What would help is a couple more pics. One with something to allow scaling it would be very useful. The suggestions provided so far range across a large set of possible sizes for the object.
"about 6 inches end-to-end"

Right there in the first post.
  #41  
Old 10-16-2016, 11:45 PM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is offline
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Home-made dildo. Double-ended, for use with a friend.
  #42  
Old 10-17-2016, 12:13 AM
Francis Vaughan Francis Vaughan is offline
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Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
"about 6 inches end-to-end"

Right there in the first post.
You know, I'm not doing so well without coffee these days.....
  #43  
Old 10-17-2016, 10:39 AM
md2000 md2000 is offline
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The posts that connect the acorn tops to the square - are they round or square?
The part that's visible seems as though it may have been round but a chunk splintered off.
Otherwise, someone went through a lot of trouble to make those smaller posts square, when rounding on a lathe would have been the easiest way to make them... suggesting this has a reason.

Square stems would suggest it slid into a paired fork specifically so it did not turn.

It sure looks like it resembles some of the parts of this contraption:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spinni...lyspinnera.jpg
  #44  
Old 10-17-2016, 12:53 PM
Spoke Spoke is offline
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Upon closer inspection, the square part in the center is beveled at the corners. That suggests to me that this object had a former life as a table leg or chair leg. That makes me incline more toward the idea that it was made by someone playing around with a lathe.

To answer questions, the rough parts connecting the acorns to the center are squared off. Looks like that part was carved down by hand. You're right, it is curious that those connecting segments would be squared off rather than rounded.

Last edited by Spoke; 10-17-2016 at 12:53 PM.
  #45  
Old 10-17-2016, 12:59 PM
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Oh, and the acorns don't unscrew. It's all just one solid piece.
  #46  
Old 10-17-2016, 03:01 PM
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I don't know about the object in question, but the next photo in your album is a ball point pen and a piece of broken flint.

Dennis
  #47  
Old 10-17-2016, 10:15 PM
igor frankensteen igor frankensteen is online now
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The only thing that comes to mind for me, would be an article of clothing-like item. People once used solid objects to simultaneously decorate, and fasten things like sashes and ropes, to hold clothing in place, for either people, or furniture.

This could be one of those decorative tie-points, sort of like a large wooden button. The cloth or rope would be wrapped around and over the unfinished part in the middle, and the rough square part would serve to provide locking friction to keep the cloth in place.
  #48  
Old 10-18-2016, 05:40 AM
Isilder Isilder is offline
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It appears to be to be for tying curtains (and similar) up without knots, and not being in anyway tricky or dangerous.

The cord is simply wrapped around the narrow bits... As long as there is sufficient loose end left hanging, the cord doesn't easily come off the spindle.
  #49  
Old 10-18-2016, 07:09 AM
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It's a pair of finials shaped together on a lathe and never seperated into two pieces. Except that would be an odd what to construct such a thing. So maybe it was done intentionally to wrap cords, thread, or yarn around, or something like that.Possibly, for no known practical reason it is a double ended door handle. Most likely nothing but an finished piece turned on a lathe.
  #50  
Old 10-18-2016, 07:14 AM
Francis Vaughan Francis Vaughan is offline
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Except that it has had a proper wood finish applied, and applied quite selectively. This is partly why I would like to see the edges of the square inner block. I think there are some clues there.
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