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Old 01-18-2017, 09:17 PM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is online now
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Alvin and the Chipmunks: What were they wearing?

The original Alvin and the Chipmunks, not the modern CGI ones.

Long shirts? Dresses? Nuns' habits?
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  #2  
Old 01-18-2017, 09:20 PM
Personal Personal is online now
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I always thought that they were long sweaters.
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Old 01-18-2017, 09:25 PM
blondebear blondebear is online now
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They sort of look like monk's (or in this case, 'munk's) robes.

Last edited by blondebear; 01-18-2017 at 09:26 PM.
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Old 01-18-2017, 09:52 PM
Ethilrist Ethilrist is offline
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Ankle-length turtle-neck sweaters, probably to avoid questions about why they're not wearing pants. And why does Alvin get an "A" on his, but Simon and Theodore don't get an "S" or "T"?
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Old 01-18-2017, 10:06 PM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is online now
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Tge same thing Uncle Fester wears, though a better cut.
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Old 01-18-2017, 10:41 PM
Mr Downtown Mr Downtown is offline
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Caftans.
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Old 01-18-2017, 11:47 PM
Son of a Rich Son of a Rich is offline
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To hell with their clothes. I want to know how chipmunks could grow so large. They're usually about the size of a hamster.
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Old 01-19-2017, 12:20 AM
rat avatar rat avatar is offline
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I don't know if this helps but:

The first record alvin had a sweater and the other two had vests with their letters.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...ctualcover.jpg

The original cover of the second album had them all with sweaters, (maybe?)

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...ctualcover.jpg

The cartoon came later and as the animator was Herbert Klynn's Format Films which also did Mr. Magoo I would assume that maybe they extended the sweater to simplify the animation for the Alvin Show.

But this is only a guess as Mr. Magoo was greatly simplified after the original Mr. Magoo - Ragtime Bear from 1949.

If you look for "When Magoo Flew" from 1955 all of the legs are just simple black lines.

There is a boy in another award winning animation by the same person called Gerald McBoing-Boing that has a boy wearing a shirt that looks similar.

So to me it is unclear if this was for ease of animation or just an artistic style.
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Old 01-19-2017, 03:47 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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A fairly common way for (sort of) animal cartoon characters to be dressed is for them to have human clothes above the waist and nothing below it. Look for pictures of Donald Duck (and Scrooge, Huey, Dewey, and Louie), Porky Pig, Winnie the Pooh, Yogi Bear (well, he only wears a tie), Top Cat, etc. The rule seemed to be to give them a little bit of clothes to signal that they were intelligent creatures, but it didn't matter what else they wore.
  #10  
Old 01-19-2017, 07:59 AM
asterion asterion is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
A fairly common way for (sort of) animal cartoon characters to be dressed is for them to have human clothes above the waist and nothing below it. Look for pictures of Donald Duck (and Scrooge, Huey, Dewey, and Louie), Porky Pig, Winnie the Pooh, Yogi Bear (well, he only wears a tie), Top Cat, etc. The rule seemed to be to give them a little bit of clothes to signal that they were intelligent creatures, but it didn't matter what else they wore.
Ziggy famously (well, once Pearls Before Swine brought it up, at least) didn't have pants.
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Old 01-19-2017, 02:37 PM
Trancephalic Trancephalic is offline
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Wearing pants is a big enough pain when you don't have a tail complicating things
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Old 01-19-2017, 02:56 PM
Jophiel Jophiel is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
Yogi Bear (well, he only wears a tie)
And, inexplicably, a shirt collar.

Edit: Well, I understand the animation reason for it. Still hella weird though.

Last edited by Jophiel; 01-19-2017 at 02:57 PM.
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Old 01-19-2017, 03:16 PM
cmkeller cmkeller is online now
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Wendell Wagner:

Quote:
A fairly common way for (sort of) animal cartoon characters to be dressed is for them to have human clothes above the waist and nothing below it..(snip)..The rule seemed to be to give them a little bit of clothes to signal that they were intelligent creatures, but it didn't matter what else they wore.
<Yax>You know what I say is weird? Clothes on animals!</Yax>
  #14  
Old 01-19-2017, 03:16 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jophiel View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
Yogi Bear (well, he only wears a tie)
And, inexplicably, a shirt collar.
Cindy Bear was topless, wearing only a skirt and a scarf.

I think the idea was that Yogi's and Cindy's fur was actually their clothing, so Yogi's collar was actually part of his pelt. Or something. Anyway, that's my fact-free opinion.
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Old 01-19-2017, 04:12 PM
Balance Balance is offline
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Originally Posted by Trancephalic View Post
Wearing pants is a big enough pain when you don't have a tail complicating things
Tails and clothing are an awkward intersection among the anthropomorphic set, it's true. In the old days, artists and animators skirted the issue (so to speak). They either had their creations eschew lower-body coverings, or clothing entirely, or they gave them loose enough outfits to cover the tail. (Conveniently, this also simplified drawing them.)

The Chipmunks' original look was the former, combined with a much stronger animal element in their appearance. They were critters dressed up in little costumes. In their later, more anthropomorphic incarnations, their sweaters were extended to cover the rest of their bodies. Since they have short tails, it's not a big leap to just cover them up. Why exactly the artist felt the need to cover them, I don't know--it could be for ease of animation, as rat avatar suggests, or it could be that they ended up looking a little too human-like, and someone decided that having them parade around with their tails hanging out was a problem.

Now, of course, the Tail Problem is mostly solved: a simple notch in the back waistline of the clothing article with a button or snap flap that goes over it, sort of like a zipperless fly in the back. Tail goes in the notch, flap is buttoned over the base of the tail, and everything is secure. (Of course, not everyone has gotten the memo. Or maybe the theriomorph in question has just been slow to update her wardrobe, since she's only recently wered.)

Well, the Tail and Clothing Problem. Chairs and other seats are still an issue.
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Old 01-19-2017, 04:47 PM
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I wish Smokey the Bear would put on a shirt. I passed the fire department this morning and he just doesn't look right with just jeans and a hat.
  #17  
Old 01-19-2017, 07:51 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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Originally Posted by Balance View Post
Tails and clothing are an awkward intersection among the anthropomorphic set, it's true. . . .
I've just been searching and can't find it...but there was a comic book in the 80s or 90s with a title like "Screwy Squirrel" that took a Tex Avery-style wacky squirrel...

Hold yer horses! That's it! It was "Wacky Squirrel!"

Anyway (what, ain'tcha ever heard of stream-of-consciousness) -- they took a wacky squirrel and gave him nephews, a la Huey, Dewey, and Louie, and they went out and had Carl Barks-style adventures. In one, Wacky was in an old-fashioned diving suit -- the kind with hoses to an air pump -- and much was made of the "tail gasket," so the tail could be out in the water, without having to be inside the suit.

Fred Perry, in Gold Digger, deals with costume modifications such as you describe.

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl just keeps hers inside her pants...
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Old 01-19-2017, 08:02 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Nuts. Word came down from the TOP ECHELONS to draw Donald Duck and Porky Pig with no pants on. It was a sex thing.
  #19  
Old 01-19-2017, 08:03 PM
Dr. Strangelove Dr. Strangelove is offline
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Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
A fairly common way for (sort of) animal cartoon characters to be dressed is for them to have human clothes above the waist and nothing below it.
How come it's ok for you boys, but when a woman... Chip, what are you doing? (not exactly NSFW, but you might want to wear headphones)
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Old 01-19-2017, 08:59 PM
TBG TBG is offline
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To hell with their clothes. I want to know how chipmunks could grow so large. They're usually about the size of a hamster.
Yeah, those talking, singing chipmunks are far too big to be realistic!

Last edited by TBG; 01-19-2017 at 08:59 PM.
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Old 01-20-2017, 10:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trinopus View Post
I've just been searching and can't find it...but there was a comic book in the 80s or 90s with a title like "Screwy Squirrel" that took a Tex Avery-style wacky squirrel...

Hold yer horses! That's it! It was "Wacky Squirrel!"

Anyway (what, ain'tcha ever heard of stream-of-consciousness) -- they took a wacky squirrel and gave him nephews, a la Huey, Dewey, and Louie, and they went out and had Carl Barks-style adventures. In one, Wacky was in an old-fashioned diving suit -- the kind with hoses to an air pump -- and much was made of the "tail gasket," so the tail could be out in the water, without having to be inside the suit.

Fred Perry, in Gold Digger, deals with costume modifications such as you describe.

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl just keeps hers inside her pants...
It's been a long time since I read "Wacky Squirrel" but all I remember is ripoffs of old Screwy Squirrel cartoons.
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Old 01-20-2017, 11:39 AM
Evan Drake Evan Drake is offline
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Originally Posted by Ethilrist View Post
Ankle-length turtle-neck sweaters, probably to avoid questions about why they're not wearing pants. And why does Alvin get an "A" on his, but Simon and Theodore don't get an "S" or "T"?

It was my understanding that over-size sweaters/jumpers/jerseys were a thing for college youth in the 1950s/60s. Plus letters. Maybe his siblings didn't go to college. The decision to go without lower wear would be hard to justify were it not for the difficulty of drawing little chipmunk pants.

Myself, I think it is a fashion whose time has returned, for others: all politicians wearing giant jerseys sans pants, instead of suit and tie, would make a definite statement, of hepcat up-to-the-minute cool modernity.

Last edited by Evan Drake; 01-20-2017 at 11:41 AM.
  #23  
Old 01-20-2017, 01:48 PM
Son of a Rich Son of a Rich is offline
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Nuts. Word came down from the TOP ECHELONS to draw Donald Duck and Porky Pig with no pants on. It was a sex thing.
Peter Griffin in his Donald Duck costume.
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Old 01-20-2017, 01:51 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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It's been a long time since I read "Wacky Squirrel" but all I remember is ripoffs of old Screwy Squirrel cartoons.
It started that way: giant mallets and sticks of dynamite. But, quite oddly, it moved onward and upward, to Carl Barks style adventures.

(In their very earliest appearances, Huey, Dewey, and Louie were brats! Troublemaking little stinkers! Very different from the noble Junior Woodchucks we can to know!)
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Old 01-20-2017, 02:48 PM
nightshadea nightshadea is offline
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Originally Posted by Trinopus View Post
It started that way: giant mallets and sticks of dynamite. But, quite oddly, it moved onward and upward, to Carl Barks style adventures.

(In their very earliest appearances, Huey, Dewey, and Louie were brats! Troublemaking little stinkers! Very different from the noble Junior Woodchucks we can to know!)
part of the idea of that came from ducktales in the original shorts they were always brats 8 times out of 10
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Old 01-20-2017, 05:45 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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Then there was the ghastly Quack Pack, where they grew up into total delinquents. Terrible, terrible premise.
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Old 01-21-2017, 11:15 AM
Lucas Jackson Lucas Jackson is offline
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And, inexplicably, a shirt collar.
And a snappy hat!



Googling Yogi I found this interesting bit...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
Animation historian Christopher P. Lehman considers the original concept of the Yogi Bear series to contain political symbolism relative to its era of production. During the late 1950s and early 1960s, racial segregation in the United States was still legally enforced, people were confined to living in their designated social "place", and attempts to venture outside it came with serious consequences. Yogi also has a designated social place, restricted to spending his life in Jellystone Park, under an overseer in the form of a White park ranger.

Yogi is living in social confinement, but tries to take advantage of his situation. People come to the Park to have picnics and bring with them picnic baskets. Yogi resorts to theft, stealing the picnic baskets, and enjoying their contents. Yogi's habitual criminality and preoccupation with his own nourishment and survival are not portrayed as negative traits. He is depicted as a sympathetic protagonist.

Yogi never actually challenges the social hierarchy of the Park, does not seriously challenge the authority of the ranger over him, and does not seek more autonomy in his life. Lehman contrasts Yogi's acceptance of the way things are with the activists of the series' contemporary African-American Civil Rights Movement who did challenge the way things were. They wanted to move beyond their designated place and integrate into wider society. The press and politicians of the time were portraying these activists as radicals and opposed their efforts. "
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Old 01-22-2017, 08:46 AM
chappachula chappachula is offline
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Googling Yogi I found this interesting bit...
{a long-winded Wiki post by a professor of "animation history"........}

yeah....right.
So we're suposed to believe that Yogi bear was a deep, philosophical statement about the nature of society.
Fer chrissakes...it's a kiddy cartoon.
Not everything needs to be analyzed to death....even here at the Dope

Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar, ya know.
  #29  
Old 01-22-2017, 11:23 AM
Tom Tildrum Tom Tildrum is online now
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There is a cgi children's cartoon on these days called "Franklin and Friends," featuring talking animals who are all neighbor kids that go to school together. The turtle wears a shell, the bear wears a vest, but the fox, the rabbit, and nearly all of the others are naked. It's such a violation of cartoon convention that I find it a little disconcerting. (And I'm sure it's just happenstance that the beaver is a girl ).
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Old 01-22-2017, 02:36 PM
Mister Rik Mister Rik is offline
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Just for fun:

http://pbfcomics.com/268/
  #31  
Old 01-24-2017, 09:47 AM
DesertDog DesertDog is online now
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The same idea was presented in Zootopia where animals (the mammals, anyway) wear clothes except at the ashram Nick takes Judy to, much to her embarrassment.
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