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Old 03-16-2017, 10:48 AM
BubbaDog BubbaDog is offline
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Your Wallpaper Victories and Horror Stories Please

We're in the process of buying a new (to us) home and the former occupant was a little old lady who loved little old lady flowery wallpaper.

Mrs. BD of course hates every bit of it and to save money she (she actually means we and probably mostly me) plans to remove the wallpaper and paint the walls.
My on-line research seems to show that perforation, steaming and scraping are the leading methods. But I'd like to hear from the teeming masses on this one.

So please, any tips you could give me on getting that stuff off the walls is appreciated.

Also, if you have a celebrated victory or horror stories about your wallpapering projects I would love to hear them.
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Old 03-16-2017, 10:50 AM
BubbaDog BubbaDog is offline
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Any passing mods if you will please fix my speeling and correct Vicitories I would appreciate it.
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Old 03-16-2017, 11:00 AM
Doctor Jackson Doctor Jackson is offline
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What's behind the wallpaper - sheetrock, plasterboard, lathe and plaster, etc. - makes a huge difference when tying to remove wallpaper. The original part of my house was built about 1960 and finished with rough plasterboard. It pretty much impossible to get old wallpaper off and leave a smooth finish. In areas where my wife wanted to use different wallpaper she had to go with a textured paper to hide the roughness of the board, in areas where she wanted paint I had to put up new 1/4" drywall over the old plasterboard. Another option would have been to skim coat the walls, but mudding is not my forte.

Do have fun, now!

Last edited by Doctor Jackson; 03-16-2017 at 11:00 AM.
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Old 03-16-2017, 11:31 AM
Pai325 Pai325 is offline
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No victory stories, only horror stories of scoring, steaming, chemicals, and every home remedy you can think of so that I could spend hours and hours picking off dime size pieces and still leaving the walls in horrible shape.

And that's not even telling you about the rooms where the people put the wallpaper right on the drywall with no paint, primer, or anything underneath. Yes, they built the house, and then they put wallpaper right on the new drywall.

If my husband were in construction, the best thing would have been to actually take the drywall off and just put up new drywall and paint, but he isn't, so we just lived with walls with gouges.

And I have never removed strippable wallpaper that stripped, even if I was the one who put it up and know the directions were followed.

I hope you have better luck.

Last edited by Pai325; 03-16-2017 at 11:31 AM.
  #5  
Old 03-16-2017, 11:42 AM
Finagle Finagle is offline
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Well, there was this yellow wall paper I had a problem with that one time...
  #6  
Old 03-16-2017, 12:15 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
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The previous owners of our house were big fans of wallpaper. So much so that they put 3-4 layers of it, at least, in every room but the kitchen.

The bedrooms had wallpaper borders all around the ceilings that we removed first, and as we started on the rest of it we realized it was several layers. At that point I made an executive decision and spent a night finding, spackling over, and smoothing down the seams, and once it dried we just painted over it. Looks fine. No regrets. Plus, at this point in the house's age I fear the wallpaper layers may actually be crucial to the integrity of the walls .
  #7  
Old 03-16-2017, 12:29 PM
MissTake MissTake is offline
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In my room, the previous occupant (my sister) put up a border of wallpaper along the ceiling.
Trying to remove it was a massive pain in the butt. That whole "fabric softener and warm water" trick? Didn't work. The gel remover you buy at the big box stores? Didn't work. Ended up renting a wallpaper steamer and that was a pain. It took two days to remove a 12" border from my small room. When you see videos, they like to show the paper coming off in nice strips, cleanly removing the glue... It's all a LIE.

If you have a lot of wallpaper to take down, hire a professional.
  #8  
Old 03-16-2017, 01:05 PM
Sattua Sattua is online now
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Every wallpapered room is different. My husband and I stripped an entire house of it eight years ago, and most of it went pretty easily. We sprayed on a wallpaper remover solution of some kind (using a hand-pump sprayer thing), let it sit, then scraped away. The biggest disaster was in the powder room, where the surface of the drywall beneath crumbled. Had to skim coat that room before we painted it.

In the past, I have had to pull wallpaper off entire rooms in one-inch-wide strips, because it wouldn't come any other way.
  #9  
Old 03-16-2017, 01:12 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Both Pepper Mill and I hate wallpaper -- it's one of the things I love about her.

Almost every room in our new house was wallpapered. There were two flocked ceilings, as well. We viewed it as a long-term project.

Best investment we made was for a wallpaper steamer. You've got a little container that you put water in and a plug that goes into the wall. After a while steam comes out through a long hose, at the end of which you typically have a rectangular tray-like thing. You put this against the wallpaper and saturate it with steam. It loosens the glue holding it on and saturates the paper, allowing you (in the best case scenario) to simply peel it off. If it's stubborn, you can use a putty knife under a raised edge to try to loosen it. Try not to dig in and scratch the plaster or plasterboard.

Sometimes this doesn't work, and more extreme measures are needed. We also used a "paper tiger" -- a doorknob-like thing you hold in your hand with toothed rollers underneath that score the wallpaper. You then go over it with the steamer again, and hopefully the steam will bleed in through the rips you just made in the wallpaper. The teeth leave little divots in the plaster that you'll have to fix later.

Occasionally you [I[still[/I] need to take more drastic methods. We had a curved archway where we couldn't use the flat steamer head. I disconnected the head and simply played the end of the hose over the paper.

Near the baseboards, the paper clung tenaciously. The guy we bought the house from was the primary owner, and he had put the paper up directly on the unpainted walls. And, it turns out, over the varnish that had slopped over onto the plaster. The wallpaper was essentially glued on by varnish as well as wallpaper paste.

There are also wallpaper paste solvents you can use to get you through tough spots.

The wallpaper in the bathroom came down pretty easily. well, most of it did. Pepper Mill got laid off from her job one day, came home in a bad mod, looked at the horrible pink wallpaper in the bathroom and tore it down with her bare hands. A lot of plaster came with it.

The flocking on the ceiling was treated in much the same way, except it couldn't come off in sheets -- it came down in wads. Pepper Mill was taking some of it down (this was on a different day, so she wasn't using anger to get it down) and saw that our cat Midnight had wandered in, and was covered in the stuff. She didn't want the cat to be licking it off, so she got into the shower, washed herself off, got a big handful of soap, grabbed Midnight, and pulled her in, soaping her up and rinsing her off and throwing her out into the hallway before she knew what hit her. To re-iterate:

a.) Yes, Pepper Mill was naked in the shower
b.) Midnight hated to get wet
c.) We don't de-claw our cats.

She's a tough one, that Pepper Mill.

To get the wallpaper in the stairwell I had to rig up a platform with boards and a ladder to reach the ceiling.


After the wallpaper was all coerced of the walls, I went though and made repairs -- replacing the stuff lost in the bathroom, spackling up the cracks, dabbing spackle into the divots left by the Paper Tiger, then sanding it all flat again.


It was worth it., The flocking was discolored (especially over the stove, where it held thirty years of grease), the flocked ceiling in the bathroom hid a bad ceiling repair that I had to fix. The wallpaper in the bathroom, kitchen, and hall were ugly. Some of the wallpaper in the living room didn't really match the rest of it, and they were clearly hoping people wouldn't notice.

The painted walls look much better.
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Old 03-16-2017, 01:15 PM
BubbaDog BubbaDog is offline
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AAAAAAAAAAAAAAGGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!

Maybe I'll get lucky and the loan will fall through.

But seriously. I've read that you can make your own stripping solution from equal parts water and vinegar. Anybody try that?
  #11  
Old 03-16-2017, 01:21 PM
BubbaDog BubbaDog is offline
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CalMeacham - What kind of steamer did you buy?

There seems to be two price points for these things.

The DIY Home Depot stuff - I think there's a Wagner model for $50-$100 and then there's the pro tools which look to be $800 to $1000. I was hoping got get away with the cheaper model but would buck up if I knew that the pricey ones were significantly better.
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Old 03-16-2017, 01:31 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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We definitely went with a cheap unit, about $100. Definitely not a $1000 device.

I borrowed someone else's at first, but it quickly became clear that we needed our own, full-time. A good thing we bought it, too. The steamer head got kinda filthy with bits of wallpaper and old paste.
  #13  
Old 03-16-2017, 01:40 PM
cormac262 cormac262 is online now
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Some years ago, I helped a friend prepare a room to be a nursery. Like you, his goal was to remove the wallpaper to then paint.

We were using some stuff from Home Depot that you sponged on, and then scraped the paper off. The stuff would be absorbed into the paper and loosen the glue. It worked reasonably well. BUT it's not until we started that we found there were multiple...like 5...layers of wallpaper before reaching the wall. (While mindlessly scrubbing I was actually thinking of calculating the volume/space loss of the room due to the thickness of the accumulated layers ;-)
So whereas this stuff worked on the "surface" layer, it would only work to varying degrees on the lower layers. And you end up with...a mess - different levels of progress on different parts of the walls. The only good thing is that once you finally get to the actual wall (on the first section), you now have a means to accurately gauge your progress !

The point is: don't go in planning to remove a "single" layer.
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Old 03-16-2017, 02:05 PM
Emerald Hawk Emerald Hawk is offline
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I've had eventual victory over a townhouse full of wallpaper.

1. I agree that every wallpapered room is different. My place had three different kinds of wallpaper that called for two different tactics.
One was pink, textured wallpaper. This type pulled apart into two layers without any chemicals. After pulling the top layer off, the bottom layer was a porous paper. The bottom layer could be removed by "painting" it with liquid Dif using a paint roller, then pulling it off while damp.
Another was a thinner wallpaper. Perforating this and then spraying it with a lot of Gel Dif was the best approach here.

2. The steamer didn't work any better than the Dif for me, and since it's more of a hassle to set up and use I only tried it once. However, perhaps there is a type of wallpaper that it works a lot better on.

3. If you are very gentle with the perforating tool ("paper tiger"), it might not leave marks on the wall. I wasn't gentle enough everywhere, and it may be impossible to do this perfectly. You should plan on needing three coats and some spackling anyway, as it's nearly impossible to leave the drywall in perfect condition afterward.

4. Allocate a lot of time. It's slow going and when I tried to rush, the paper would rip or layers would separate, making it take even longer. Or I would damage the drywall, requiring extra spackling and making the final result look worse. It took me about a year of working weekends on and off to remove wallpaper from about 800 sq. ft. across 3 rooms. And this was before I had children.

Afterward, my wife and I agreed we would never again buy a house with wallpaper.
  #15  
Old 03-16-2017, 02:18 PM
RobDog RobDog is offline
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Worst stuff I've ever had to tackle is painted woodchip wallpaper on a ceiling. Absolutely vile. No amount of steam, piercing with spiked rollers, or soaking in removal fluid (even a specialised enzyme-based one called Zinsser DIF which essentially breaks down the underlying paste) so much as dented it. Ended up boarding over the whole ceiling, losing about 25mm of height. Luckily it was a pretty tall ceiling to begin with so not a big tragedy.

Upside; the tools and techniques we bought and learned came in handy when it came to the walls in the same room (luckily covered in "normal" wallpaper), which we absolutely spanked. The Zinsser DIF was especially effective. We spiked the paper, applied the fluid, and the next morning it was essentially falling off. Bliss.
  #16  
Old 03-16-2017, 02:42 PM
Sattua Sattua is online now
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But seriously. I've read that you can make your own stripping solution from equal parts water and vinegar. Anybody try that?
Dude, do you want to get the wallpaper off or not?
  #17  
Old 03-16-2017, 03:22 PM
Dogzilla Dogzilla is offline
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I tore out wallpaper in my kitchen & dining room and in one bathroom. They must have done the bathroom first because they'd put up backing paper in the kitchen and it all came down nicely. I did not have an actual wallpaper steamer, but I had this little Scünci steamer (that I'd ordered from an infomercial when I waked and baked once; do not recommend) and that did okay, but the water capacity was small and I'd have to refill the thing and wait for it to heat back up so it was a pain in the ass and I should have just invested in a proper wallpaper steamer.

And either I couldn't figure out how to use it or Dif just didn't work at all for me. Same with the paper tiger thingy. Upon preview, I'm reading the post above this one and they let the Dif soak in overnight. Huh. Never thought of that. :: face palm ::

Now, in the bathroom, they put the wallpaper straight on and it wasn't that old and a scraper + Scünci steamer were employed. This resulted in huge chunks of wallboard being pulled off with the old wallpaper and that's how I learned to "skim mud" or whatever with the joint compound.

Anyway, friends don't let friends put up wallpaper.
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Old 03-16-2017, 04:12 PM
PastTense PastTense is offline
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This is the wrong approach. Just buy paneling and put on the walls over the wallpaper.

Otherwise just paint the wallpaper as is.

The worst approach is to try to strip wallpaper.
  #19  
Old 03-16-2017, 04:21 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Originally Posted by PastTense View Post
This is the wrong approach. Just buy paneling and put on the walls over the wallpaper.

Otherwise just paint the wallpaper as is.

The worst approach is to try to strip wallpaper.
Totally disagree. Patterned wallpaper is a bitch to cover. And things start looking downright awful if the wallpaper starts to blister or peel.

Better to have a clean surface to start with -- get rid of the old wallpaper. It's worth the effort.
  #20  
Old 03-16-2017, 04:40 PM
JcWoman JcWoman is offline
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When we bought the house we currently live in, it was covered - every room - in wallpaper. (Also frilly floor length curtains, but that's another story.) We've removed the wallpaper in about half the house by now (about 12 years later). We've had the same mixed results as everybody else here - success depends on the wall, the wall preparation, the paper type and lots of other things. I'll just tell you our worst.

We happened to be remodelling our master bathroom at the time, which grew as projects do to include the bedroom. We had a design-build firm doing that work and for reasons I forget now we decided to remove the wallpaper from the guest bathroom. Nothing worked, not the solvents or the steamer or the perferations. Everything combined and the best we could do was pick off dime-sized pieces with a large chunk of drywall, so it was a total failure. We finally called the sheetrock contractor over from the other room and said "yeah, I know it's a change order and will cost us extra, but... take this room down to studs and re-drywall it, too."
  #21  
Old 03-16-2017, 05:02 PM
ethelbert ethelbert is offline
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Your success will depend on how the wallpaper was installed. If the wall was properly prepared and sized, you might be able to wet it down and peel it off in strips (you will think "why are all those folks whining? This is easy!"). Otherwise you could be in a situation where every square inch is a hard fought battle and you will give up and wallboard over it. I've had both, and some in between.

Good luck and let us know how it ends up.
  #22  
Old 03-16-2017, 05:04 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is online now
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Hire a professional to do the project, from start to finish. Wallpaper is NOT a DIY project.

Years ago, I worked with a woman who had recently gone through a messy divorce. At some point, she said that she and her ex had wallpapered a room, and I said, "Now I know why you got divorced!" I then apologized, and she said, "You're not the first person who's said that."



Don't do this yourself.
  #23  
Old 03-16-2017, 05:42 PM
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My house was much like you described, all rooms had to be stripped. I bought good large sponges and a spray bottle and I used plaster knives, at least 5”, for actual stripping. The method was: start early, have a barrel and garbage bag ready. Peel off what you can by hand, trash it, wet down what you can't with light soapy water. Go have breakfast. Come back, wet it all down again. Go check email. Answer emails. Come back, wet it all down again. Find something else to do for a half hour. Wet it down again, now start stripping. If it's not half-falling off the walls, wet it again until it is. If you are afraid to gouge the wall you're using too much pressure. I'd be gently picking at seams and pulling the paper off in 4' strips, and letting them fall directly into the barrel.

The walls weren't damaged and showed no adverse effects. We cleaned and painted them afterwards.
  #24  
Old 03-16-2017, 06:29 PM
Tastes of Chocolate Tastes of Chocolate is offline
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My last wallpaper fiasco resulted in me eventually hiring someone to remove all the sheet rock in a 1/2 bath.

The wallpaper was peeling in a small 5'x6' bathroom, so I figured "This will be easy, I'll take it down, clean it up, and paint it." Layer 1 pealed of, not to bad, to reveal layer 2 below that. Layer 2 was partially removed, and apparently had been placed directed on the sheet rock, with no primer or paint below it. So rather than take it all off, layer 1 had been added on top.

I have been here before, and ended up skim coating the entire bathroom, after the wallpaper removal damaged the sheet rock, so I decided to go straight for sheet rock removal and replacement ("Hey, it's a tiny room, resheet rocking will be easy, plus I can see where all the wires and plumbing run, to make other remodeling easier") Well, and I found mold and punky sheet rock under the window, where it had obviously gotten wet repeatedly.

Then... I found that the sheet rock had been not only nailed to the studs, but glued on with mastic. The stuff looked like tar, but over 45 years had hardened to the consistency of obsidian. And in order to find that, I'd already punched holes in it. Time to call in the professionals.

The good news is, my bathroom has no more mold, improved insulation, and nice new flat sheet rock. Oh, and I know where all the wiring and plumbing is.

Last edited by Tastes of Chocolate; 03-16-2017 at 06:30 PM.
  #25  
Old 03-16-2017, 06:43 PM
Grrr! Grrr! is online now
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As someone who used to hang wallpaper for a living, I strongly suggest you avoid stripping it if at all possible.

Hang over it or paint over it. But don't strip!
  #26  
Old 03-17-2017, 08:42 AM
ftg ftg is offline
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We went thru this a few years ago.

1st room: Put on stripper and ran the holey-thing over it. Came off easy-peasy. Really big sheets. Barely had to do a second application anywhere.

2nd room: Put on stripper, etc. Nothing. The stuff wouldn't come off in big pieces. Some scrapping ensued. Result: tearing off of some of the drywall paper.

What was the difference? The first room had primer on the walls. The second the wallpaper was put on bare drywall.

Lots and lots of effort ensued. Tried a steamer and all that. Then had to do some skim coating over the bad parts. Painted it this time. But still not a smooth enough finish, so new wallpaper over that. Actually looks nice.

3rd room: hired a pro. Took him a lot of effort, a lot of wall compound to smooth things out. Looks mostly okay but still not like a normally smooth wall after painting.

4th room: To heck with it. Thick paint. Multiple layers. Looks decent.

If you are ever in a position to put wallpaper on drywall: paint it first. Doesn't have to look great, won't take long, but saves a huge headache later.
  #27  
Old 03-17-2017, 08:55 AM
BubbaDog BubbaDog is offline
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Well, we're lucky in the fact that we are buying from the original owner. She is a retired lady who had to move to assisted living and has her daughter selling off the estate.
I'm think that the daughter will be helpful in telling us what's under the wallpaper (paint or bare sheet-rock).

I read some of your posts to Mrs. BD. She has had good and bad experiences with wallpaper so she's approaching this with at least an understanding of the possibilities.
With good luck we may close next Friday and that will give us the weekend to test the walls in each room.
  #28  
Old 03-17-2017, 09:24 AM
JcWoman JcWoman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tastes of Chocolate View Post
apparently had been placed directed on the sheet rock, with no primer or paint below it.
In case any lurkers are reading this and wondering why this is such an issue, it's because drywall consists of three layers: paper, a thick layer of gypsum plaster, and paper on the other side. When you paste wallpaper directly to unprimed drywall it glues the wallpaper and the drywall paper layer together pretty permanently. If you try to take the wallpaper down and the drywall paper comes along with it, you're screwed and that's when you have to repair or replace the drywall.
  #29  
Old 03-17-2017, 09:57 AM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is offline
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Any passing mods if you will please fix my speeling and correct Vicitories I would appreciate it.
Done.
  #30  
Old 03-17-2017, 10:33 AM
Renee Renee is offline
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Originally Posted by JcWoman View Post
In case any lurkers are reading this and wondering why this is such an issue, it's because drywall consists of three layers: paper, a thick layer of gypsum plaster, and paper on the other side. When you paste wallpaper directly to unprimed drywall it glues the wallpaper and the drywall paper layer together pretty permanently. If you try to take the wallpaper down and the drywall paper comes along with it, you're screwed and that's when you have to repair or replace the drywall.
Yes. We encountered this situation in a previous house. The drywall and the paper were as one. Removing it was impossible without destroying the drywall. We painted over it, and it was fine.

Other rooms sometimes strip relatively easily. But if you have the permanently bonded situation, you're better off covering it.
  #31  
Old 03-17-2017, 11:36 AM
FairyChatMom FairyChatMom is online now
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The previous owners of our house put Contact paper on the kitchen walls. Z-brick, too. We knew when we bought the house that we were going to gut the kitchen anyway, so we ended up just tearing out the sheetrock.

They'd also, at one point, had 2 layers of Contact paper in the hall bathroom, but again, we removed the walls completely because the room was awful and we replaced everything, right down to the light switch. Had we not be young, ambitious DIYers, we wouldn't have bought the house. It needed way too much work to drag it kicking and screaming out of the middle 70s.

As for real wallpaper, all they'd done was put up a bunch of rather tacky borders which came down fairly easily with a perforator and the thick goopy blue stuff. Good riddance to bad florals!
  #32  
Old 03-17-2017, 12:56 PM
kopek kopek is offline
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The in-laws house, even the ceilings were wallpapered. And in many rooms painted over the paper. Luckily we were just selling it and could let it be someone else's issue to deal with. It hurt the value somewhat but we managed.
  #33  
Old 03-19-2017, 01:06 PM
DrumBum DrumBum is offline
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Our house came with some hideous wallpaper from the sixties in several rooms. We tried several products to remove it but the easiest was just to remove the and replace the sheetrock, then and paint over.
  #34  
Old 03-19-2017, 01:30 PM
usedtobe usedtobe is offline
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I went through 6 layers of paper (top one: huge, dark green, w/18" dusty/filthy roses).

It ain't fun but can be entertaining (but only for the seriously disturbed).

Score, soak (vinegar?) for a few weeks. Remember - that crap has been up for decades - another couple of weeks will not seriously degrade the karma level of the universe.

And steam - forget the cute little machines. I got one at Goodwill to see if it will clean some old spray crap on patio door. I can't believe anyone thought this 3# or plastic with a whole gallon capacity could do wall coverings.

The rental machine I used weight 40#, used lots of propane and still was a slow slog.
There should be units which can hook to a faucet and/or hose bib and produce continuous steam. Find one.

Why I posted: the first house I remember had old paper we removed. Under the bottom layer, we found the signature and date of the paper hanger.
Whoever removes the (ugly in THEIR eyes only) paper will find my name and a 1984 date.

After stripping paper, paint would be a huge letdown - a couple of sawhorses, a cheap slab door, roller and brush and hang your own.
  #35  
Old 03-27-2017, 03:42 PM
Sam Spayed PI Sam Spayed PI is offline
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None of my own, but someone I used to work with was wallpapering her bathroom, got up too quickly, and cracked her skull on the toilet. She actually got a pretty bad concussion and was out of work for a week. Her sympathetic co-workers took an old motorcycle helmet, glued on scraps of wallpaper, and presented her with a "wallpaper helmet" upon her return to the office.
  #36  
Old 03-27-2017, 03:50 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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I would install quarter inch drywall. It's not expensive and you get a great surface to prime and paint. Home Depot sells it for $10.50 a sheet.

I knew somebody that tried painting wallpaper. Took several coats. The weight of the paint started pulling sections of wallpaper away from the wall. Not pretty.

Last edited by aceplace57; 03-27-2017 at 03:54 PM.
  #37  
Old 03-27-2017, 04:34 PM
Gatopescado Gatopescado is online now
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My Victory:

Many years ago, as a poor young man, I was working at an equipment rental place. An older lady came it to rent a steamer to remove old, ugly wall paper. I helped her out, and she wasn't sure she could do the job, so she hired me to do it and paid me very well! She also said she'd introduce me to her daughter, but I finished the job before that ever happened.

It wasn't too difficult. Let the steam do the work for you.
  #38  
Old 03-27-2017, 10:36 PM
usedtobe usedtobe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
I would install quarter inch drywall. It's not expensive and you get a great surface to prime and paint. Home Depot sells it for $10.50 a sheet.

I knew somebody that tried painting wallpaper. Took several coats. The weight of the paint started pulling sections of wallpaper away from the wall. Not pretty.
For an even thinner cover:
1/8" Masonite, with rough side out. Fill rough side with wallboard compound (mud).

I had a kitchen wall (plaster and lath) so badly cracked it would have been easier to tear it out and hang sheetrock. To understand the enormity of that statement, try to rear out a tiny bit of plaster and lathe.

Masonite, mud, and wallpaper - the only way to tell is that the trim seems 1/8" thinner on that wall.
  #39  
Old 04-25-2017, 11:51 AM
BubbaDog BubbaDog is offline
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Location: KC MO or there abouts
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Bump for a final update.

We went after the demon wallpaper with a determination usually reserved for Armageddon battles. The wallpaper won.

Luckily we found a lady who does this stuff for a living. She was so fast and good that we hired her to paint the rooms that she de-wallpapered.

She was so good at painting those rooms that we hired her to paint more rooms.

Unfortunately her methods remains a mystery to us as she only worked during our work hours so observing her secrets wasn't a possibility. I suspect some sort of sorcery which she fortunately used for only good purposes.
  #40  
Old 04-25-2017, 12:30 PM
octopus octopus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
I would install quarter inch drywall. It's not expensive and you get a great surface to prime and paint. Home Depot sells it for $10.50 a sheet.

I knew somebody that tried painting wallpaper. Took several coats. The weight of the paint started pulling sections of wallpaper away from the wall. Not pretty.
That's one way to get the wallpaper off.
  #41  
Old 04-26-2017, 03:41 PM
Doctor Jackson Doctor Jackson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BubbaDog View Post
Unfortunately her methods remains a mystery to us as she only worked during our work hours so observing her secrets wasn't a possibility. I suspect some sort of sorcery which she fortunately used for only good purposes.
So far as you know. A thorough, preemptive exorcism is probably a good idea...
  #42  
Old 04-28-2017, 07:16 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: NH
Posts: 21,836
Quote:
Originally Posted by BubbaDog View Post
Bump for a final update.

We went after the demon wallpaper with a determination usually reserved for Armageddon battles. The wallpaper won.

Luckily we found a lady who does this stuff for a living. She was so fast and good that we hired her to paint the rooms that she de-wallpapered.

She was so good at painting those rooms that we hired her to paint more rooms.

Unfortunately her methods remains a mystery to us as she only worked during our work hours so observing her secrets wasn't a possibility. I suspect some sort of sorcery which she fortunately used for only good purposes.
I hope you'll forgive my nosiness because I'm only asking this because so many houses on the market locally are so thoroughly papered, and I'm thinking I'll eventually need to find a similar wizard so I'm contemplating logistics of accomplishing this sort of thing when no one's home... How'd she get access to your house if you were both working? Did you leave her a key, or did you or your spouse let her in before you left for work? Oh, or does one of you work from home, and just didn't have time to observe?
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