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  #101  
Old 07-26-2006, 08:31 AM
delphica delphica is offline
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It's probably wrong to get so much satisfaction every time I saw something on my Hated Books list get mentioned in this thread.

Strangely enough, I think I have only literally thrown three books I have read, and they are all books that I like:

1. Stephen King's IT

(this one is so flagrant that I have to use a spoiler box)

SPOILER:
When Eddie dies -- how cruel is that? Stephen, you heartless bastard, you killed Eddie! What did Eddie ever do to you? Absolute hysterics and book-flinging on my part. I did crawl back over to it almost immediately to finish it.


2. David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest

When I got to the end and realized you don't get any satisfication about what happens to anyone. I was getting a little nervous as the book neared the end because things weren't getting wrapped up, but it was hard to gauge because so much of the back of the book is taken up with the footnote section. That's a big book to throw, broke the spine and everything. It was mostly annoying because I wanted David Foster Wallace to be in the room with me so that I could deliver a long satisfying (to me, perhaps not to him) lecture on all my complaints. Overall though, I did (grudgingly) like the book and while I don't agree with many of the choices he made as a writer, I respect his willingness to push boundaries.

3. Thomas Harris's Red Dragon

To offset all the well-deserved criticism of Hannibal in this thread, I think Red Dragon might be the scariest book I have ever read in my life. I get nervous just thinking about it. Because I am a complete and total moron, I read Red Dragon while I was home alone one night. I was so wigged that at a crucial plot moment, I had a little spaz out and flung up my hands, inadvertently tossing the paperback into the air. I did the "hot potato" thing with it for a few moments, juggling it around, and then gave it one final toss and volleyball-served it across the room as hard as I could because at that particular moment in my life, the scary book had to be as far away from me as possible.
  #102  
Old 07-26-2006, 08:36 AM
beowulf573 beowulf573 is offline
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The Witching Hour by Anne Rice. I liked the book itself, until I get to the end of a 1000+ paperback only to find a cliff hangar where:

SPOILER:

The heroine's undergoes a spontaneous abortion, and the fetus place is taken by a ghost, she's kidnapped, and her husband is at the bottom of a pool.


What's worse is I droppd the cash for the rest of the novels to see how it ended.
  #103  
Old 07-26-2006, 01:47 PM
Larry Borgia Larry Borgia is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner
_The Cryptonomicon_ by Neal Stephenson. It must be the worst edited book in history. Sure, there are lots of worse books, but this book has good writing buried under prose that any decent editor would have cut.
Wow. I'm reading this book right now and it's moved onto my top ten list. Maybe the second half sucks, but so far it's fascinating and very readable. I love the digressions and the snarky prose style. He's like Pynchon, but without Pynchon's contempt for the reader. I know Stephenson has problems ending his books, so I'll wait to finish it before rendering final judgement, but I'm enjoying it so far. My favorite bits aren't the computer stories but rather the WW2 adventure with Bobby Shaftoe and Goto Dengo.

I'm thinking of giving the Baroque cycle a try, something I was sure I wouldn't do.
  #104  
Old 07-26-2006, 02:03 PM
jackdavinci jackdavinci is offline
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Originally Posted by Smeghead
As I've mentioned before, and I'm sure I'll mention again, the worst book (series, actually) in the history of Homo sapiens is the Mission Earth series by L. Ron Hubbard.
I actually enjoyed this series lol. Anyone who bothers to read more than the first two can't complain too much. Granted, I read this in High School. And I wasn't yet aware of the whole Scientology thing (altho I was very curious about the fact that he was still writing five years after his death). And part of my motivating factor was that there was a book reading contest and a decology helped put me over the edge (I won btw). But whatever subtext there was from Hubbard went completely unnoticed by me and I just enjoyed it for the sci-fi adventure and larger than life heroes and villians who were fun to root for and against. And the fact that the entire series was written from the villian's point of view just made things more interesting.
  #105  
Old 07-26-2006, 02:32 PM
awldune awldune is offline
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Originally Posted by Larry Borgia
I'm thinking of giving the Baroque cycle a try, something I was sure I wouldn't do.
Be warned, I loved Crytonomicon and Stephenson's older books but I gave up on Quicksilver. Soooo rambling and unfocused. There's a lot of neat stuff along the way, but I found it very hard to follow.
  #106  
Old 07-26-2006, 02:45 PM
Kizarvexius Kizarvexius is offline
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I've been a fan of war and espionage thrillers since I was in high school. One of my favorite writers in this area is Ken Follett. Eye of the Needle, The Key to Rebecca, and The Man From St. Petersburg all rocked. Good stuff. So it was with great enthusiasm that I bought and set out to read his novel Night Over Water.

Promising beginning. Interesting setting. The obligatory sex scene was nicely written. About two-thirds of the way through the book, though, the damned thing just fell apart. Stupid, stupid, stupid! It's rare that I don't finish a book if I'm more than 100 pages into it, but I was sorely tempted with each additional chapter to chuck this one aside...only my faith in the author's talents, as testified by his previous works, kept me at the task. When I did finish the thing, I was so disgusted that I did -- quite literally -- fling it across the room.

As a result, I avoided Follett's works for a number of years. It was only with great trepidation that I picked up another book of his and gave it a chance. And I've very glad I did, because Pillars of the Earth is among my top 10 favorite books of all time. I like to think that the reason Night Over Water turned out to be such a piece of shit is that he lost interest halfway through, having come up with the idea to write PotE, but had to finish it for contractual reasons.
  #107  
Old 07-26-2006, 02:59 PM
Boulter's Canary Boulter's Canary is offline
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Originally Posted by Jahdra
The Mists of Fucking Avalon. I. Hate. That. Book. With the fire of a million, trillion suns. I read it in high school and I threw it, as hard as I could, screaming, across the room about a third of the way through it. Come to think of it, I threw it back and forth across the room a couple of times. I felt mildly guilty for breaking the spine on a brand new library book (I worked in the library and had first dibs on it) but I figured the book deserved it. I don't know why I tried to read it in the first place, I utterly despise, loath and detest the whole Arthurian cycle. There are no, have never been, and never will be, any good stories in the Arthurian cycle. There, I feel much better now.

Another book that I threw across the room was some futuristic fantasy, set in Boston, I think, where the author tortured the protagonists throughout the book and in the end, they were right back where they started and about to do it all over again. It was all for naught.
Yes! At last! Somebody else who hates that sorry waste of trees (not that I agree with you about arthurian stories. There are some decent ones).
Ninteen-sixties hippies masquerading as first-century barbarians. In the real post-Roman world they wouldn't have survived five minutes.

Other books I threw - that 'global warming is a myth' thing by Michael Crichton. (I've even blanked the title). Pure propaganda and badly written to boot. I booted it.

Oh, and (like all people with an IQ larger than their shoe size) I chucked the only Xanth novel I ever attempted to read somewhere around the hundred and sixty-second vile, shitty pun. i.e. somewhere around page fifteen.
  #108  
Old 07-26-2006, 03:27 PM
Smeghead Smeghead is offline
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Originally Posted by awldune
Be warned, I loved Crytonomicon and Stephenson's older books but I gave up on Quicksilver. Soooo rambling and unfocused. There's a lot of neat stuff along the way, but I found it very hard to follow.
I felt the same way the first time I read Quicksilver, but I've made a second attempt now, and I enjoyed it much more this time around. When I finish the series, I'll no doubt post a long-winded overly analytical explanation as to why that no one will bother reading.
  #109  
Old 07-26-2006, 03:34 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boulter's Canary

Oh, and (like all people with an IQ larger than their shoe size) I chucked the only Xanth novel I ever attempted to read somewhere around the hundred and sixty-second vile, shitty pun. i.e. somewhere around page fifteen.
Acually, the first 3 or so aren't bad at all. The rest get worse & worse quickly.
  #110  
Old 07-26-2006, 04:08 PM
Star Female Star Female is offline
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Darkness and Dawn. A sorry excuse for a book which the author uses to make some sort of weird-ass racist point.
  #111  
Old 07-26-2006, 05:17 PM
Delly Delly is offline
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Only one I can think of at the moment and that was Steinbecks The Grapes of Wrath- it just ends, and you never find out what exactly happens to the family, do they go home, do they eventually find decent work, do they stay together etc tec. That really annoyed me especially after I staying up half the night to see how it would end.
  #112  
Old 07-26-2006, 05:25 PM
Ghanima Ghanima is offline
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I almost threw the latest Sword of Truth book across the room. But then I decided that they might frown upon that at the bookstore. I had picked it up to read the synopsis, hoping against hope that it wouldn't be yet another version of his "hero & heroine are separated by some kind of misunderstood magic that he will solve quite easily in the last 20 pages" but there it was. I went home and threw away all of the previous books except "Wizard's First Rule" which I thought was relatively clever plus had cool sadistic chicks wearing leather.

Terry Goodkind, I hereby sentence you to being locked in a room for all eternity with Robert Jordan, forced to read each other's shitty unending series' while the souls of all your betrayed readers feast upon your flesh.
  #113  
Old 07-26-2006, 07:46 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is online now
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Originally Posted by Ghanima
Terry Goodkind, I hereby sentence you to being locked in a room for all eternity with Robert Jordan, forced to read each other's shitty unending series' while the souls of all your betrayed readers feast upon your flesh.
Ohpleaseohpleaseohpleaseohplease.
  #114  
Old 07-26-2006, 07:56 PM
lizardling lizardling is offline
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I nominate some cookie-cutter fantasy dreck called "Eldrie the Healer - The Bastard Princess Book 1". Checking on Amazon, I have to wonder what the reviewers were smoking.

My god.

There were not enough rolleyes in the world for that waste of perfectly good hedgehog litter. It was all Pwecious Spunky Gurl Makes Good And Has Romance Pasteded On Yay. Granted, there are authors who can get good mileage out of that and not make the average teenage girl roll their eyes, but this author was not one of them. I've seen better writing from the romance novels at the dollar store.
  #115  
Old 07-27-2006, 12:47 AM
Morigale Morigale is offline
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Most of these books, I can't remember the name of. And I didn't throw them across the room, since they were library books and my room is full of things I'd rather not break.

(I may have some details wrong, since I haven't read these books in ages...)

1. A Star Trek DS9 book where the writer seemed to be inserting death and maiming on minor characters simply as a way to spice things up. The descriptions were, naturally, more detailed in those sections than any of the others. Plus she wrote half the characters as morons, assholes or both.
The ending was the worst;
SPOILER:
The true villain brings out a character, an old lady, and threatens the secondary villain with killing her. Something or other happens and the old lady gets her throat slit. Then the villain's ship is blasted and one of the few likeable characters in the whole thing, the main villain's friend, is hit in the head and killed. The good guys go across to find the main villain holding his dead friend who, if I recall correctly, has brains dripping out.


2. A victorian-era lesbian romance between a woman and a jailed psychic. Everything is leading up to a good ending, and then...
SPOILER:
It was all a trick. The psychic escapes to paris with her true lover, the woman's maid, and leaves the woman to either be outcast (she's already sent off a letter explaining to her family what's going on and not to worry, so they know she's a lesbian) or kill herself. In the final paragraph she opens the window and looks down at the river... and the book ends. It just about killed me.


3. Two different horror novels by the same guy. The plots, setting, etc. were different but in both, all the female characters turn out to be evil and bla bla bla. Terrible, mysoginistic, wrecked half the things he'd set up in the beginning in order to turn the female characters evil... and at the end of one, the main male character wakes up in a hospital with his daughter, who's talking to the nurse. It turns out she's pretending to be his wife and intends to have incestuous demon-babies with him. Oooookay then.

4. The Sword of Maiden's Tears, by... who knows. It was an excellent book but the ending... well, let's just say that the ending turns out badly for all the characters. I believe there was a sequel promised but I'm afraid to look for it. One of the few books that ever made me cry and I DID fling it across the room.

5. Some mystery novel. I flung it in the trash right about the time one of the characters we're supposed to be siding with starts going on and on and ON about various racist, homophobic crap. Maybe I was wrong, maybe we weren't supposed to side with her. But I never made it far enough to tell.

... you know too much about me now. I'll be over there hiding.
  #116  
Old 07-27-2006, 01:04 AM
FisherQueen FisherQueen is offline
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Originally Posted by Morigale

2. A victorian-era lesbian romance between a woman and a jailed psychic.
Possibly "Affinity," by Sarah Waters?
  #117  
Old 07-27-2006, 02:07 AM
Morigale Morigale is offline
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Yes, that sounds like it. I was told she was a really good writer, but after reading that one I was afraid to try her other books.
  #118  
Old 07-27-2006, 03:21 AM
Tuckerfan Tuckerfan is offline
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One that I'd blocked from memory until Boulter's Canary mentioned the hippy stuff: Cassandra by some East German bitch. It's the Iliad told from the Trojan's perspective, with the Greeks being vile evil bastards who've come to sack Troy, even though Paris showed up with some other chick instead of Helen (apparently, she knew the novel was going to suck and refused to appear in it). The whole thing is this whiny bullshit about what happy, loving people the Trojans were before the way, and how the war changed them. One of the characters whines for like ten pages about how military discipline is destroying the individuality of the soldiers. God, I hated that book and I never would have finished it if I hadn't had to read it for a college English course. Oh yeah, after the Berlin Wall came down, it turned out that the author was a snitch for the East German secret police. Damned commie pinko sow.
  #119  
Old 08-01-2006, 05:02 AM
Bites When Provoked Bites When Provoked is offline
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1. Gormenghast: Mervyn Peake
2. Of Mice and Men: Steinbeck.

Both of them flung across the room, and in the case of Gormenghast, I think I actually jumped on it after. Wretched writing, completely unlikeable characters...just generally abysmal.

I mentioned these in a previous thread way back and was told that Of Mice and Men is a work of genius. I continue to disagree.
  #120  
Old 08-01-2006, 10:03 AM
FriarTed FriarTed is offline
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Originally Posted by Dr. Rieux
So, am I the only person on the planet who liked Hannibal?
No, you're not. I enjoyed it in part because I could imagine the cries of outrage at the ending. I was NOT surprised that Jodie Foster immediately opted out. Nor that the ending was changed for the movie (tho I do wish they'd filmed it, tho even more, I wish they'd kept the subplots of Lecter's childhood and Gary Oldman's
character's sister.
  #121  
Old 08-01-2006, 10:36 AM
Skald the Rhymer Skald the Rhymer is offline
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No, you're not. I enjoyed it in part because I could imagine the cries of outrage at the ending.
It's not just the ENDING that sucks in that book, FriarTed. The whole things reads like something from the "Mirror, Mirror" universe--and not in a good, Starling & Mapp make hot lesbian love way, either.
  #122  
Old 08-01-2006, 10:43 AM
HazelNutCoffee HazelNutCoffee is offline
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The Shanara series, by Terry Brooks. Talk about fantasy cliches. Unfortunately I just HAD to see how the stupid thing ended and bought all four books. One day I will gleefully burn them and scatter their ashes to the four winds.

Sarah Douglass is another fantasy author that makes me growl.

I tried five times to read War and Peace before shoving it into my bookcase. Now I refuse to even look at it.
  #123  
Old 08-01-2006, 12:09 PM
Catamount Catamount is offline
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Ah, throwing bad books. A cherished hobby of mine.

The first book I ever threw was The Players Come Again. It's a murder mystery in which the murderer doesn't even show up until the second-to-last chapter. The rest of the book is written about boring people who have boring conversations and boring intrigues.

I've also thrown The Catcher in the Rye and Franney and Zooey because J.D. Salinger is a self-obsessed prat who needs to stop being so <vile profanity deleted> self-righteous.

The book that suffered the most at my hands was Thomas Wolfe's 700-page snorefest Look Homeward, Angel. I read the whole thing thinking that it couldn't possibly get worse. I was wrong. It got worse and worse with each successive page. I not only tossed that one across the room, I stomped on it several times. I would have torn it into bits and burned them, but it was a library book.
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  #124  
Old 08-01-2006, 12:30 PM
Catamount Catamount is offline
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Originally Posted by Jahdra
The Mists of Fucking Avalon. I. Hate. That. Book. With the fire of a million, trillion suns. I read it in high school and I threw it, as hard as I could, screaming, across the room about a third of the way through it. Come to think of it, I threw it back and forth across the room a couple of times. I felt mildly guilty for breaking the spine on a brand new library book (I worked in the library and had first dibs on it) but I figured the book deserved it. I don't know why I tried to read it in the first place, I utterly despise, loath and detest the whole Arthurian cycle. There are no, have never been, and never will be, any good stories in the Arthurian cycle. There, I feel much better now.
I respectfully submit that I love Arthurian fantasy, including TMOFA, but there are two sections in the book that can be ripped out without damaging the rest of the story:

SPOILER:
the threesome with Arthur, Gwenhwyfar, and Launcelot


and

SPOILER:
when Gwen gets raped by her half brother who is then stabbed by Lance and then she has sex with him to celebrate


I've actually marked the chapter where the second spoiler happens so I never damage my brain by reading it again.
  #125  
Old 08-01-2006, 07:58 PM
Scissorjack Scissorjack is offline
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Originally Posted by Bites When Provoked
1. Gormenghast: Mervyn Peake

...and in the case of Gormenghast, I think I actually jumped on it after. Wretched writing, completely unlikeable characters...just generally abysmal.
That's it, pistols at dawn. Gormenghast and Titus Groan were the best fantasy novels of the last century, although Titus Alone was pretty piss-poor: Steerpike and Doctor Prunesquallor were great characters and splendid adversaries, Titus himself was a whiny git.

The last book I think I actively flung away was Caleb Carr's SF novel Killing Time. I like Caleb Carr. I thought that The Alienist and Angel Of Darkness were excellent historical thrillers, really evocative of 1890's New York. But Killing Time, Jesus - it read like it had been written by someone who had never actually read any SF but had only heard it described and thought he'd give it a bash over a weekend.
  #126  
Old 08-02-2006, 05:18 AM
Bites When Provoked Bites When Provoked is offline
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Originally Posted by Case Sensitive
That's it, pistols at dawn. Gormenghast and Titus Groan were the best fantasy novels of the last century, although Titus Alone was pretty piss-poor: Steerpike and Doctor Prunesquallor were great characters and splendid adversaries, Titus himself was a whiny git.
The character that made me completely lose my block was ... a nanny, I think... with a stupid name. "Suck" or "Whinge" or something equally bad but also accurate. I just wanted to set her, Titus, and - most particularly - the author alight.

Perhaps we can agree to meet halfway on this, and settle for fried eggs and bacon at dawn? Because really, other than this completely inexplicable respect for an author whose books desperately need stomping on, setting alight, and ritual purification by a young priest and an old priest.... I actually rather like you, Case Sensitive.
  #127  
Old 08-02-2006, 05:31 AM
Scissorjack Scissorjack is offline
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Originally Posted by Bites When Provoked
Perhaps we can agree to meet halfway on this, and settle for fried eggs and bacon at dawn? Because really, other than this completely inexplicable respect for an author whose books desperately need stomping on, setting alight, and ritual purification by a young priest and an old priest.... I actually rather like you, Case Sensitive.
Chuck on arson goo.
  #128  
Old 08-03-2006, 09:54 AM
Bites When Provoked Bites When Provoked is offline
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... I wish I knew what that meant.
  #129  
Old 08-03-2006, 01:50 PM
kushiel kushiel is offline
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Originally Posted by HazelNutCoffee
Sarah Douglass is another fantasy author that makes me growl.
ARGH! I started reading the first Wayfarer book, loved Faraday, loved Faraday and Axis as a couple, hated Azhure from the start, and about halfway through I went onto Amazon to check the names of the next books and reviews, and found out...yeah. I chucked the book across the room, then went back and skimmed it for what little Axis/Faraday there was left.
  #130  
Old 08-03-2006, 05:21 PM
Scissorjack Scissorjack is offline
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Originally Posted by Bites When Provoked
... I wish I knew what that meant.
It's a more or less phonetic rendering of "Chacun a son gout", or "Each has his own taste". Or "Everybody has gout"; my French is a little rusty.
  #131  
Old 08-03-2006, 11:26 PM
Catamount Catamount is offline
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There was one audiobook that my sister, her husband, and I seriously discussed throwing out the car window and backing over several times, but, alas, 'twas a library book and they didn't want to have to spend money on it. It was some Nicholas Sparks novel they picked up for a long car trip. The main character's wife had been killed on a lonely country road and her killer was never found. MC's son began having problems at school. MC meets Sexy Dedicated Teacher who keeps son after school to help him. MC and SDT fall in love. We gave up on it shortly after my sister and I started arguing over whether or not MC and SDT's love was exactly ethical and we ended up asking our cousin the solution to the mystery. We had figured it out on the first side of the first tape.

Needless to say, we found other things to listen to on the way home.
  #132  
Old 08-04-2006, 11:26 AM
ddgryphon ddgryphon is offline
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Originally Posted by Boulter's Canary
Oh, and (like all people with an IQ larger than their shoe size) I chucked the only Xanth novel I ever attempted to read somewhere around the hundred and sixty-second vile, shitty pun. i.e. somewhere around page fifteen.
I absolutely LOVE bad puns -- but those books are excrable. Someone suggested them to me and I couldn't ge through so much as 50 pages of that thing. I've tried to read other thing by Anthony, but I have no clue as to what makes him an enduring prolific writer.

I have a theory that he turned out so many books so quickly that they all saw print before anyone realized how bad they were.
  #133  
Old 08-04-2006, 01:25 PM
UKCatGirl UKCatGirl is offline
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Bram Stoker's Dracula. I know that altered versions have been released many times, and some may be better than what I read. I couldn't tell you which edition I read, because I have since thrown it out. The whole way it was structured, with the letters and the overlapping points of view made it longer than it should have been IMHO. It bored me to the point where I could only read about 50 pages at a time, and then I would just mentally tune out what I was reading. About half way through I had a theory that I could skip 100 or so pages, start reading again, and feel as though I missed nothing. Guess what? I was right.
  #134  
Old 08-04-2006, 09:23 PM
JR Brown JR Brown is offline
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I'm another of those people who will finish a book I don't particularly like just for sake of completeness. These are the only books I couldn't get through in the last few years (I don't usually buy books until I've read them courtesy of the library, so no throwing):

A Confederacy of Dunces, John Kennedy Toole (humor): picked it up because of multiple recommendations by writers I respect. Maybe it improves miraculously after the first 25 pages, but the part I read was dreck, and not funny at all. I can't believe it won a Pulitzer.

Hopscotch, Kevin Anderson (science fiction): picked it up because it was the first decent-looking thing on the SF shelf at the library which I hadn't already read. For some reason I thought it was a first novel, so I was cutting the author a lot of slack in regards poor characterization, bad plotting, improbable behavior, etc. Then about a third of the way in I read the author's blurb, and if I remember correctly it was his eighth book (which goes to show that those Star Wars serial things don't actually count as writing). Stopped reading right there.

I used to love the Xanth novels as a child. This is why 9-year-olds are not allowed to vote. You'd have to pay me major moolah to get me to read anything by Piers Anthony these days.

A book I finished but hated: some pop-sci "evolutionary psychology" (in quotes because it was crap, not because I don't believe in evolutionary psychology) book that made a bunch of claims about human sexuality and why women secretly wanted to get pregnant by rapists and so forth. What drove me over the edge was that although trumpeting "scientific research" at every turn, there was no bibliography, no notes, no references, no support for the author's assertions whatsoever. If it hadn't been a library book I'd have burned it. I've blocked any memory of the author and title, obviously due to posttraumatic stress syndrome.

JRB
  #135  
Old 08-04-2006, 11:48 PM
Xema Xema is offline
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Originally Posted by Gulo gulo
Henry Fielding's Tom Jones almost kissed the I-5. I regret keeping it because I'm considering reading it again and I know it will torture me.
This is exactly how I felt about this book when forced to read it in high school. (Or rather, forced to pretend to have read it.) Insupportably tedious.

Some 12 years later I actually did read it - and found it to be excellent. Either the book changed or I did.
  #136  
Old 08-06-2006, 12:47 AM
Malienation Malienation is offline
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Ladies:

Try The Manipulated Man, by Esther Vilar

My curiousity is overwhelming me. Let me know how you feel.

(Don't say I didn't warn you)
__________________
As far as society is concerned, men don't really have feelings. Now, women, they have feelings, and men pay heavy penalties for not respecting those feelings. On the other hand, men have insecurities, and women collect substantial rewards for learning how to exploit them.
  #137  
Old 08-08-2006, 02:17 AM
Sleel Sleel is offline
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The only book that I can remember ever honoring this way was Mine. The opening scene where the crazy militant hippy
SPOILER:
puts her baby on the grill
made me hurl the damn thing in disgust. Since I seem to have a constitutional inability to not finish a book, however, I eventually picked it back up and read further, where I found that the incident was a delusion. It ended up actually being a pretty decent book.

I hated the Thomas Covenant book, Lord Foul's Bane, too. I actually don't mind anti-heroes, or loathsome protagonists, but the writing, the overuse -- hell, the outright abuse -- of the thesaurus, the implausibilities even within a fantasy of the characters and their motivations, and the utter pointlessness of the whole thing caused me much pain. The rape was almost the HIGHLIGHT of the whole mess. I skim-read the last 2/3 of the thing hoping it would get better. It didn't.
  #138  
Old 08-11-2006, 08:10 PM
Viridiana Viridiana is offline
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Oh! I guess I'm a little late, but The Basic Eight by Daniel Handler. I have no idea how popular it actually is; I only heard of it because it was based on my high school. But what a god-awful piece of steaming crap. Not only did the story and characters suck ass, but the fake 'discussion questions' and annotations ("look! remember this dialogue here, it becomes meaningful later") were just grating in the extreme, not fun, subversive or deliciously sardonic. Plus, it's not like I'm a giant fan of my high school, but his digs at it were unrealistic and mean-spirited. Not funny, just obvious.
  #139  
Old 12-06-2017, 08:01 PM
Sunny007 Sunny007 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridget Burke View Post
Because I liked the cover, I read "The Copper Crown" by Patricia Kennealy. I found it silly--this "Keltic" thing is getting out of hand. 99% of the characters were "Mary Jane's." And the prose was absolutely Leaden--despite all the "Celtic Twilight" balderdash, some Irish/Scots/Welsh/Whatever have been known to write with style.
Got to add Patricia Kennealy's Blackmantle to this list too. She wrote it as a fictionalized version of her life with Jim Morrison, in other words, fiction like her memoir Strange Days is, but set in her Keltic outer space world.

I staggered through this over several years and threw it across the room numerous times. Most of the characters have anagram names of the real ppl they're named after so the reader knows who PK is talking about. The whole thing is way over done with Kennealy's writing talent (describing the Janis Joplin character as being "a bronze-lunged woman") gets completely shaded by the absolute Mary Sueishness of it all.

The heroine has to literally go through Hell/the Underworld, to bring the Jim Morrison character back to life to live happily ever after with her (of course.) The writing is as leaden as her other books, which I could never manage to get past the first chapter. The romance novel cover painting is the crappy icing on top of a pile of crap.

Last edited by engineer_comp_geek; 12-06-2017 at 08:35 PM. Reason: fixed quote tags
  #140  
Old 12-06-2017, 11:10 PM
4d3fect 4d3fect is offline
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The Bridge, by D. Keith Mano.

I didn't merely throw it across the room, I launched it off our balcony into the alley.

That was a disgusting read.
  #141  
Old 12-06-2017, 11:22 PM
jaycat jaycat is offline
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Both Elvis Costello's and Morrissey's autobiographies... insufferable.
  #142  
Old 12-07-2017, 08:50 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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I don't remember if I replied to this in the past eleven years, but two of them would be by Sherman Alexi and Terry Pratchett. I handed in better writing than that when I was in high school Enslish, and got a C.
  #143  
Old 12-07-2017, 09:02 PM
Arkcon Arkcon is offline
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After seeing the movie several times in TV, I went and bought Frank Herbert's Dune, and I enjoyed it. And I read his other Dune novels in the library, they were fair, I liked where the story went, and how it wrapped up. Fine. So they use his notes to write a prequel, The Butlerian Jihad. And they really didn't have to. What I like least about it is how, even though this is going to be one of several prequel novels, everything that's going to happen 10000 years from now, we're seeing the beginings happen right now. Like they were going over a checklist.
  #144  
Old 12-07-2017, 09:09 PM
Sefton Sefton is offline
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I loved the first three-quarters of Stephen King's The Stand, but the ending completely pissed me off. The book left a solid dent in the drywall.
  #145  
Old 12-07-2017, 09:16 PM
Arkcon Arkcon is offline
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I like Harper Lee's "Go Set a Watchman" more then some people do, the beginning and ending do a good job of providing context for "To Kill a Mockingbird." However, there's a whole bit in the middle, regarding,
SPOILER:
her first kiss leading her to believe she his pregnant and the fear of the shame and getting suicidal
that just feels like its the notes for another, less mature novel.
  #146  
Old 12-07-2017, 09:47 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is online now
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I've never thrown a book across a room. I did, however, hand my copy of Rabbit, Run to someone in my dorm who hurled it down the hallway. (I didn't know she was planning to do it; she was having a bad Finals Week and was throwing any books people would let her get her hands on.) That said, I concurred with this action, due to
SPOILER:
the scene where the woman was bathing her baby in the sink and lets the baby drown.
  #147  
Old 12-07-2017, 10:05 PM
Catamount Catamount is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catamount View Post
Ah, throwing bad books. A cherished hobby of mine.
<snip>
The book that suffered the most at my hands was Thomas Wolfe's 700-page snorefest Look Homeward, Angel. I read the whole thing thinking that it couldn't possibly get worse. I was wrong. It got worse and worse with each successive page. I not only tossed that one across the room, I stomped on it several times. I would have torn it into bits and burned them, but it was a library book.
In the eleven years since this thread began I lived in Asheville for a while and reread LHA. Now I get it and it's one of my favorite books. All it took was the realization that all the people he talks about are still there. Nothing has changed in a century. (Except there are more tourists now.)

These days I hate The Ladies of Missalonghi, which I ran over with my car, and Heroes and Villains, which I dropped down a storm drain.

Last edited by Catamount; 12-07-2017 at 10:09 PM.
  #148  
Old 12-08-2017, 01:35 AM
gkster gkster is offline
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Unfortunately I'm too repressed to really let go and throw books across the room, but I've been tempted.

By Toni Morrison's Beloved, for one--I had to read it for a class but when it was over I refused to keep it in my house. Yes, slavery was terrible; I've read some really moving and excellent books about it, like Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. I know that it's a topic that needs to be explored and recorded. But I was completely turned off by what struck me as the sheer pretentiousness of the writing and of the over-the-top horror plot.

Another fling-worthy book is Flambards Divided by K.M. Peyton. It's the 4th and last novel in a series and has the characters from the first 3 books acting so completely out of character that it's disturbing and disillusioning. I hated the way that the author dragged down people who were very likeable in the first three books and wish I had never read it.

As for The Ladies of Missalonghi, if I had a copy I would throw it as far as possible and then destroy it. It sounds like an absolute horror, especially since I'm a fan of The Blue Castle, the charming L.M. Montgomery novel which Colleen McCullough refused to admit she plagiarized.
From her NY Times obit:
She drew unwelcome attention in 1987 with the publication of her novella “The Ladies of Missalonghi,” about an impecunious woman in early-20th-century Australia. As some critics pointed out, the book’s plot, characters and narrative details strongly resembled those of “The Blue Castle,” a 1926 novel by L. M. Montgomery, the author of “Anne of Green Gables.”
Ms. McCullough, who said that she had read “The Blue Castle” in childhood, swatted away charges of plagiarism.
“I am not a thief,” she told The Daily Mail, the British newspaper, in 1988. “Neither am I a fool. I have too many wonderful ideas of my own to have to steal from another writer.”
https://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/30/b...ies-at-77.html
  #149  
Old 12-08-2017, 06:31 AM
nachtmusick nachtmusick is offline
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Math books. So many math books. I wasn't terrible at math, just never got the answers right.

I have flipped, dropped, and torn fiction; but with math books I wrecked drywall.
  #150  
Old 12-08-2017, 08:57 AM
Gyrate Gyrate is offline
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Sophie's World - a clever concept for a book which then went all to hell in the last chapter or two in a nihilistic frenzy of anarchy and underage sex. It's like the author basically went "Fuck it, I dunno how to finish this."

Last week I was on a train chatting to a college student who was slogging her way through Tristram Shandy (assigned reading, naturally) and who probably would have hurled it out the train window had it opened. We came to the conclusion that Sterne was an asshole who didn't like his readers very much.
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