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  #1  
Old 11-04-2013, 04:40 PM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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new SyFy show Naked Vegas

Didn't see a thread. SyFy has a new show out called "Naked Vegas". It follows a bodypainting shop in Las Vegas as they do various and sundry jobs doing full body painting.

First off, it is not a competition show, more of a "see what they're up to" format. Also, for Face Off fans from season 2, one of the painters is Nix, the guy who got voted off early for the disastrous underwater turtle beast.

I watched the first episode, they had two events to cover. The first was a friend of the owner who is opening a business designing lingerie. There was some special lingerie show going on, and as a "creative idea" to show off her designs (before she has anything actually built) she wanted to have herself and two models painted up with body-paint versions of her outfits. So the staff had to take paper designs of lingerie and paint them onto the models, using shadowning and color layers to create 3-D illusions.

They had a neat idea for making fishnet stockings - they painted a dark under layer, then put on a pair of stockings and painted a lighter color, then removed the stockings. It appeared like a light sheer stocking with a darker fishnet overlay.

There was a minor stress out over the need to apply some sort of latex sticky bra thing to cover the underboob, to meet the venue's requirements. So even though they applied a latex pastie over the nipple before the paint job, they had to come up with some sort of boob cover and then paint over that. Apparently the stickybra they acquired wouldn't work, so they had to fake up something from some pasties. What I wondered is why they didn't just make up some layers of liquid latex and build their own. In the end, after the paint job was applied, it was hard to see that they did anything.

The second job was even more dramatic. They got called in by a couple who had met in a haunted house and so wanted to do a Zombie-themed wedding. That's right, they wanted the wedding party done up in full zombie make up. Now the bride and groom were thinking of wearing costumes and then getting made up around that, but the store owner naturally decided they should do full-body makeup instead, and upsold them the package. Basically, the guys would wear some layer of underwear and the ladies would have something covering their privates, but otherwise they'd just be wearing body paint.

So doing a party of six in one day to get ready for the wedding on time, naturally there were time management headaches. Including the unfortunate discovery the groom had a former girlfriend's name tattooed on his stomach, and some nervous laughter overheard by the bride caused a situation that required finessing.

In the end, the make up job turned out pretty good, and they did the wedding in a haunted house chapel there in Vegas, complete with shambling down the aisles and gorey sick zombie make up. Yeah for zombies! But they were happy with the outcome.

Weird show. I'll have to see how it holds my interest.
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  #2  
Old 11-07-2013, 11:05 AM
shiftless shiftless is offline
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Bump.
As always with these shows, they have to manufacture drama at each commercial break, then repeat the drama when we come back, as if we've forgotten what we were watching in those few minutes.

- OMG, THE WHOLE EFFECT WILL BE RUINED BY THIS CHANGE!!!
- Commercial break
- OMG, THE WHOLE EFFECT WILL BE RUINED BY THIS CHANGE!!!
- So we will just paint over it. Because the show is about body painting.

The drama falls flat.

Otherwise I'm liking this show. The paint jobs in the first two episodes were very cool and they were allowed to show, in-between the drama, some of the techniques used. And the girls are mostly naked. What's not to love in a show that deals with the complex issues of underboob and nipple coverage?

I was ready to dislike 'Nix' from the very beginning. I thought the eye makeup and and the artsy look was overdone and was expecting him to be the obligatory overly flamboyant gay cast member who creates all the drama with unreasonable demands. I stand corrected. His professionalism and creativity are the backbone of the company, judging from what I've seen, and I would enjoy a weekly 1 hour documentary on his work.
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  #3  
Old 11-07-2013, 12:21 PM
CandidGamera CandidGamera is offline
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I am encouraged by the current positive trend towards more 'naked' shows.
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  #4  
Old 11-07-2013, 01:47 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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I watched an episode. I liked the body painting scenes, both for the art techniques and for the near nudity. But I wasn't happy with the drama in between. It seemed overwrought and manufactured. This is a common problem with reality shows like this: I want to watch professionals at work but the producers assume we're more interested in the "personalities".
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  #5  
Old 11-07-2013, 02:02 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Same as the above. Watched it for the nekkidness, left it when they brought out the "drama." One show was enough for me.
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  #6  
Old 11-07-2013, 02:34 PM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shiftless View Post
As always with these shows, they have to manufacture drama at each commercial break, then repeat the drama when we come back, as if we've forgotten what we were watching in those few minutes.
Sadly, they are catering to the market place where people channel flip, so some portion of the audience will come in to the show at any point. Reality shows are the easiest to incorporate some quick recap or "drama entrapment" to catch attention right after a commercial break. It's the same reason they all have the "Coming up" segments right before commercials: our poor attention deficit audience may get bored by three commercials unless we preview some dramatic moment and leave them with a mini-cliffhanger. *yawn*


Quote:
Otherwise I'm liking this show. The paint jobs in the first two episodes were very cool and they were allowed to show, in-between the drama, some of the techniques used.
Yes, I appreciate the excellent paint jobs and the discussion about techniques. The "Oh My God the customer wants to change our concept at the last minute!" stuff is less thrilling. Yes, customers are dicks and expect you to work miracles in no time.

Quote:
I was ready to dislike 'Nix' from the very beginning. I thought the eye makeup and and the artsy look was overdone and was expecting him to be the obligatory overly flamboyant gay cast member who creates all the drama with unreasonable demands. I stand corrected. His professionalism and creativity are the backbone of the company, judging from what I've seen, and I would enjoy a weekly 1 hour documentary on his work.
Yes, Nix is the epitome of professional and calm and reasoning through rather than emotional overwrought and fabricated me-me-me tension.

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Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
I watched an episode. I liked the body painting scenes, both for the art techniques and for the near nudity. But I wasn't happy with the drama in between. It seemed overwrought and manufactured. This is a common problem with reality shows like this: I want to watch professionals at work but the producers assume we're more interested in the "personalities".
Yes, it's frustrating that to watch the cool body painting I have to put up with the frustrating pacing, the spoilering previews, and the overwrought unnecessary panic drama.

I get that you have tight deadlines, that you have changing customer desires, that some of the challenges you don't know how you can pull off, like the water slide paint. But sometimes it seems they're forcing a drama moment that just sucks dead air instead.

Case in point, episode 2. There were two events. The second, they were hired by a guy with a new company to sell "Alien Tequila", a new brand marketed in an alien-head-shaped bottle with stylized writing. And the promo was to be a demo party at ParaCon, which apparently is a paranormal convention held in Vegas. Think aliens, mysticism, all forms of strangeness. A large segment of the crowd believes Roswell was an alien event.

So the first thing we see is the customer showing up and doing a meeting where the staff try to capture his attention with their first round of brainstorming alien concepts. Okay, he loved the sign - it was pretty neat. Then they show him some art and the first they show is a "reptilian alien". The guy's response: "There is no such thing as reptilian aliens." WTF? Okay, hang on, if we're going there, there's no such thing as alien grays either, but nevermind that, let's just ask David Icke about those reptilian aliens, he'll tell you they're real and taking over the world.

So that moment played for the "oh no we'll lose the gig by not catching his attention properly" but really just was a "oh shit our customer is a believer, quick, keep going" moment.

The next concept was very cartoony and unlike anything in pop culture, which didn't seem very appropriate and really seemed like it was thrown in to have another forced "not that" choice. Before their third option, the fairly standard alien "gray", i.e. big bald head, big eyes, small skinny body alien all over the place. Which is what the bottle looks like, so it is fairly safe to think he's going to approve that look.

Anyway, he definitely wanted an alien gray to fit his motif, but then tells them to make two more and be creative and surprise him. But wait, he didn't like their other two concepts, but now wants them to make stuff up. So, why not use a reptilian alien?

I liked the concepts they came up with, the assignment of the gray alien was a no-brainer give the models. Pick the short one for the short alien. Duh. The creepy walks were amusing. The tequila in the backpack was fun. Oops, dribbled on her leg. "Oh no we don't have time for this!" So repaint it in the car or when you get there right before the reveal. *yawn*

In the end the customer was thrilled so it all worked out.

I'll jump back to the first customer, which was being hired for a music video being shot where they need to demonstrate "Vegas Hot" as the theme to fit the song. The director and producer are shooting at the hotel with a water slide that goes through an aquarium. They want the story to involve stealing the band's clothes and ending up in the pool. For body paint. To try to keep paint on in the water and through the friction of the slide. Yay!

So Red (the shop owner) immediately asks about creative control. Now that makes sense, she needs to know how tightly structured her assignment is, is she stuck with a very tight image "cat burglars wearing masks" or does she have creative license? That allows her to know how creative with the imagery she can be. But they sure make is sound like a power play on her part, like episode 1 where she upsells the clients on the full-body paint zombies. Because that's what she does, full body paint.

Anyway, burglars was a weak idea, they had broad license just have to hit the basic theme of "Vegas Hot" and the plot of stealing clothes and going down the slide. So they come up with an alternate concept, pirates. They can make that sexy with imagery. Cool.

I'm sure they didn't just run off and start pirating without bouncing that back to the customer, but they didn't show that part and emphasized stressing over concerns the customer would approve of the results.

Now here's what bugged me on the first part, the non-linear story. First they showed the customer meeting, they jump to painting the models, then show the band show up to see the progress. And the band likes the pirates, but then want to add an element for Vegas Hot. They want the pirates to be devils to play to the concept of fire and flames or such. So the painting is well along and nearly complete and then they have to adapt and try to turn them into devil pirates.

After the commercial break, they jump to .... "we've got this assignment and so we need to experiment to figure how to make the paints hold up, so let's come up with concepts and how to execute the paint. Go get water and run a paint and rubbing test. Think about techniques for making the boots and such with 3D elements." Stuff that all had to happen before they started painting the models above. Then they jump back to changing up the pirates to make them devil pirates, and finally the delivery to the hotel for the video shoot. And everything works out. The paint holds up to the chlorine and the friction and the customers are happy. Yay!

I like that Nix argued for three different alien concepts rather than two similar grays and then one different one. Red had a valid point that the primary goal was to make the customer happy by meeting his expectations for his brand, and he really wanted the gray alien design. But Nix had two good counter points, first, the customer told them they could do two different types as long as they had the one gray, and that he wanted them to be creative and surprise him and wow him. Second, while the primary customer was the tequila owner, the publicity of the event would really help them sell themselves if they could make some dramatic alien designs to pop and make the crowd excited. And actually, making the crowd excited would only help the primary customer with his promotional party. So I think Nix's points were the right call.

Anyway, it was entertaining. Mostly.
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  #7  
Old 11-07-2013, 02:35 PM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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Oh yeah, "nipple tape". Just had to be said.
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  #8  
Old 11-07-2013, 03:00 PM
Boyo Jim Boyo Jim is offline
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Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
... near nudity...
Can someone expand on this? Need details fast!
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  #9  
Old 11-07-2013, 03:23 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Well, something can expand on it, anyway.
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  #10  
Old 11-07-2013, 04:18 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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Originally Posted by Boyo Jim View Post
Can someone expand on this? Need details fast!
The models are mostly female and mostly naked when they get body painted. They generally wear a bikini bottom and nipple pasties. So an undeniable part of the attraction of the show is checking out the models.
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  #11  
Old 11-07-2013, 04:57 PM
Noelq Noelq is offline
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Yep.

I'd love for them to focus on the painting techniques, details, innovative ways to get the designs done, etc.

The drama totally, totally wrecks it for me. The drama may make me not watch this show.
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  #12  
Old 11-07-2013, 10:39 PM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
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I suppose it would be completely pointless to ask what the hell it has to do with science fiction...
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  #13  
Old 11-07-2013, 11:32 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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Originally Posted by kaylasdad99 View Post
I suppose it would be completely pointless to ask what the hell it has to do with science fiction...
Well, they're painting people to look like aliens, so...

Look, it's better than wrestling, okay?
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  #14  
Old 11-08-2013, 07:44 AM
Boyo Jim Boyo Jim is offline
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Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
...Look, it's better than wrestling, okay?
Wow, with an endorsement like this! ... Uh, never mind ...
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  #15  
Old 11-08-2013, 08:04 AM
Bartman Bartman is offline
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I am certain that a lot of this is manufactured. I know Red and Wiser. And they are both acting up to be in "character." They are both clearly playing roles based on their real personalities but dialed up to 11, yo. Basically they are playing caricatures of themselves.

A lot of the drama is clearly manufactured. Oh no, the client wants the models to be devil pirates... not just pirates. How convenient that we have two pair of devil horn prosthetics pre-cast and just lying around. And wow, convenient that our design allows us to to not have to make any changes to incorporate that.

Likewise the lingerie issue. That is something that all body painters ask as one of the first questions, what is the coverage requirement of the models, client, and venue. The idea that they would be surprised like that is ludicrous. How convenient, that their designs all allowed the breasts to be re-painted.

Still all in all the designs are fun. And I'm enjoying the show. But the manufactured ridiculousness of the whole thing does wear a bit thin.
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  #16  
Old 11-08-2013, 08:56 AM
C K Dexter Haven C K Dexter Haven is offline
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We assumed that the drama is manufactured, and they're playing to the camera. That's not what intrigues us, what intrigues us is how over-the-top the whole situation is. The first week: a zombie wedding, with the whole wedding party in body paint? I mean, regardless of the amount of phony drama ("There's not time to finish, we'll have to paint them in the car"), that was just weird, bizarre, and utterly amusing. Ditto the devil-pirates and the water slide, and the aliens advertising vodka.

The same drama ("OMG, we're out of time!") is used in every one of the competitive "reality" shows, from Project Runway to Face Off and everything in between. Yes, I agree, it's really, really old hat... every damn week, on every damn show.
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Old 11-08-2013, 09:07 AM
shiftless shiftless is offline
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Originally Posted by C K Dexter Haven View Post
The same drama ("OMG, we're out of time!") is used in every one of the competitive "reality" shows, from Project Runway to Face Off and everything in between. Yes, I agree, it's really, really old hat... every damn week, on every damn show.
I would like to elaborate on your excellent point but for reasons that make no sense to me I'm only allowed 20 seconds to type my response! So yeah, what he ...
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Old 11-08-2013, 10:32 AM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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Originally Posted by kaylasdad99 View Post
I suppose it would be completely pointless to ask what the hell it has to do with science fiction...
Let's see, in two episodes they have had a Zombie wedding, devil pirates for a music video, and aliens to sell alien tequila. The only one that wasn't really science fiction was the lingerie show. So yeah, there's a heavy SF theme to their projects.

More importantly, the show is a sort of spin off from Face Off, the special effects make up show that heavily features SF and fantasy themes. I say sort of a spin off because it's not a competition show, but they're doing body painting with small elements of special effects make up (the devil prosthetics, the alien head gear and double face).


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Originally Posted by Bartman View Post
I am certain that a lot of this is manufactured. I know Red and Wiser. And they are both acting up to be in "character."
Yes, we can tell, and it's annoying. Please tell them for us.

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A lot of the drama is clearly manufactured. Oh no, the client wants the models to be devil pirates... not just pirates. How convenient that we have two pair of devil horn prosthetics pre-cast and just lying around. And wow, convenient that our design allows us to to not have to make any changes to incorporate that.
Those devil prosthetics look like precast appliances that can be bought in specialty shops, the kind of thing that Face Off uses by the pile in their Foundation Challenges. I'm sure they have a bucket/bin/storage rack full of generic prosthetics. They specifically commented about prepping the appliances - they used the industry term I don't recall, where they cover the surface with a layer of something to seal it so it won't absorb the paint. Note they had some other assistant prep that, an assistant who has not shown up in any of the show so far.

As for the design allowing it to be incorporated, I'm not sure what you think they would have done with the design that would have precluded the forehead prosthetic. I mean, they did paint on eye patches for both girls, and then devise patches out of nipple covers because they didn't want to fabricate any "cheap props" (). But other than that, what else was in the way? What else could have been in the way? And they did have to redo a bit of the paint job, they had to apply red over the "exposed" flesh and tone in the muscle shadowing, and overlaid/replaced some of the scarring they had already applied. Yes, they went around the complicated bits like boots and outfit, but that's hardly surprising. You have a nearly completed work, told to modify it, you look for the least effort modification.

What they really missed out on was the client's talk about flames. There were no flames evident on either of the girls. If they'd been doing the devil girl premise from scratch with the clients' comments about "all flames and shit" (paraphrased), they probably would have put some flames on them, no?

Quote:
Likewise the lingerie issue. That is something that all body painters ask as one of the first questions, what is the coverage requirement of the models, client, and venue. The idea that they would be surprised like that is ludicrous. How convenient, that their designs all allowed the breasts to be re-painted.
It did seem ill-prepared of them not to know that up front. But I don't understand how their designs could have precluded repainting. It's all paint. They have all the supplies to remove paint, and they can paint over paint. It's not like they had an actual jewel that had to be suspended in the middle of their chests by some sticky bra obstructing appliance.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CK Dexter Haven
The same drama ("OMG, we're out of time!") is used in every one of the competitive "reality" shows, from Project Runway to Face Off and everything in between.
Deadlines are a part of any assignment. Especially competitions. It's natural that there is always someone rushing to get done. Especially when tasks for shows are designed to be tight deadlines, precisely to make it a challenge. I mean, just think about Face Off if every Spotlight Challenge the competitors had 5 full days. Hell, just give them 3 ten hour days, instead of 1 five hour day, 1 ten hour day, then 1 five hour application day. (That gives them 3 hours to film the presentations for a nominal 8 hour day).

For body painting, there's a certain amount of prep work possible - laying out designs on paper, practicing novel techniques, etc. We are shown them doing that ahead of time when they can. But a large part of their work is application to the model, and one day's work likely won't carry over to a second day, so there really isn't the ability to do it a day in advance, and give lots of extra time to complete the job. Basically they have to task out the challenge, figure out how much prep time it will take to apply the job, then schedule that amount of pre-event time. And then plan for an early morning if that's what it takes. But since application is an art form, those schedules are estimates, and reality intrudes. Like the maid of honor being late for no explicit reason, or a last minute design tweak by the customer.

So yes, deadlines are real, and people naturally stress when they are under deadlines and they face challenges - fabrication failures, equipment failures, inspiration challenges, whatever. The thing is, the producers seem to think the audiences will better appreciate the ones screaming and throwing tantrums and running around willy nilly, because they edit and encourage those kinds of events. But for my money the ones who buckle down and roll with the punches and push on through are the ones that really get respect and usually succeed.

Such as Face Off, when Roy had a giant mold that he accidentally used the wrong foam, and it ruined the mold. He had to scramble to come up with something. What he came up with was a disaster, but he tried and he faced it with grace and he accepted the criticism. Similarly, look at Laura when the "scars" she prepped were too stretchy and didn't want to come loose from the mold. She fell back on her plan B, and still had a fabulous result. Far more enjoyable than Miranda stressing out because she isn't sure her sculpting work is any good, when she's been winning the challenges on the quality and detail of those same sculpts.

We get it - there are deadlines, there is stress because of it. Now show us the approach, the techniques, the solutions, the work arounds, and the overall results. Show us how they perservered or why they didn't overcome.
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Old 11-10-2013, 01:56 PM
Bartman Bartman is offline
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Originally Posted by Irishman View Post
Yes, we can tell, and it's annoying. Please tell them for us.
Believe me I will... much taunting will ensue.
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Those devil prosthetics look like precast appliances that can be bought in specialty shops, the kind of thing that Face Off uses by the pile in their Foundation Challenges.
I don't think those were commercial. They looked sharper than the ones you can buy in shops. Most painters I know (including myself) cast most of our own prosthetics, or buy them from specialty manufacturers. I carry a few small ones around that are used over and over... but something like horns is too uncommon to have precast. Either SyFy is bankrolling them more than I expect, or they knew the change was coming.
Quote:
It did seem ill-prepared of them not to know that up front. But I don't understand how their designs could have precluded repainting. It's all paint. They have all the supplies to remove paint, and they can paint over paint. It's not like they had an actual jewel that had to be suspended in the middle of their chests by some sticky bra obstructing appliance.
The lace spray over technique is a standard in all painters toolkits. But it is difficult in that it is a one shot deal. You can never quite line up the patterns again to re-airbrush. On the models they were using that technique, they divided the pattern such that they wouldn't have to repaint more than the breasts. I've never done or seen a corset or other lingerie using that design. Either the friend had some pretty unique designs, or they did that intentionally in anticipation of the problem. The pasty bra was also odd. I've used those pasties before, and they are not a uniform thickness, and the thickness varies by quite a bit. Either those were pre-made (or at least pre-planned) or they would have looked odd, lumpy, with some hard edges. And they didn't look lumpy or hard-edged to me.

I've been in, and seen terrible painting conditions. Nothing like having a competition start, have your partner show up 15 minutes later hungover, and not have the model show at all. Or get to the "green room" only to find that it is 40 degrees, and the heat will take until after the show starts to get up to 70. Heck my last paid gig, I had to repaint my model 3 times, because the client was unhappy with the look despite the fact that I warned him of exactly the problem he was bitching about. Stuff happens. It happens all the time. In fact fewer gigs have gone as planned than not... But none of their crises looked our sounded like the ones I have had to deal with in real life. Either they are less skilled, prepared, and professional than I am (and they aren't) or these are manufactured for DRAMATIC purposes.
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Old 11-11-2013, 12:55 AM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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Interesting. Thanks for your perspective.

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Originally Posted by Bartman View Post
I don't think those were commercial. They looked sharper than the ones you can buy in shops. Most painters I know (including myself) cast most of our own prosthetics, or buy them from specialty manufacturers. I carry a few small ones around that are used over and over... but something like horns is too uncommon to have precast. Either SyFy is bankrolling them more than I expect, or they knew the change was coming.
I'm certainly no expert.

Quote:
The pasty bra was also odd. I've used those pasties before, and they are not a uniform thickness, and the thickness varies by quite a bit. Either those were pre-made (or at least pre-planned) or they would have looked odd, lumpy, with some hard edges. And they didn't look lumpy or hard-edged to me.
That was one thing that I found hard to buy. The were applying pasties to make some kind of underbra, and then ended up with a smooth flat surface. I'm just wondering if it wouldn't have been easier to run a few layers of liquid latex and then paint over, and if anybody asks, "Sure, we used a sticky bra." Not that I know, just seemed to me the result was very smooth with no indications of trying to piece together misshapen stretched bits.
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  #21  
Old 11-11-2013, 09:24 AM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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Finally got around to watching this show. But I watched it with the sound off as I was raiding in a Second Life game and needed to wear my headphones. So I still got to see the nakedness and cool painting techniques but missed all the drama. Highly recommended!

I was thinking as I watched the show that pasties are one of the silliest things evah ... they would not exist if we did not have such a weird fetish about seeing women's nipples. The only practical use I know of for them or anything like them is dress shields for nursing mothers. (OK, I've seen metallic pasties used as a substitute for upper torso armor of any kind by female warriors in various comics, but once again we're in weird fetish territory. Also, not real.)
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Old 11-12-2013, 04:34 PM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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As explained in that episode, if one puts on nipple tape to keep the pokies in control and then puts a pastie across it, one then has a breast with a smooth palate for painting with no protuberances. No texture changes do to temperature.

But yes, pasties are basically because of a nipple taboo.
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  #23  
Old 11-14-2013, 05:06 PM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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I liked this week's episode.

I was thrown at first with Penn and Teller so blatantly telling us how they wanted to do the trick. I do think it makes sense, they have an idea for a result in mind but don't really know how to accomplish it, so they sub it out to body painters to figure out the details. The contortionists was really a great choice. It allows better, more interesting body positioning rather than just a series of people standing next to each other.

I am once again impressed with Nix. He understood the premise of the request, it's not "have a body-painted person run out with the card painted on her/him", it's "have a few people move into position and then reveal one and only one card". I suppose he came up with the only reasonable way to do it - paint one 10 card and then cover symbols as necessary. The downside is the pattern layouts may not quite look right for how cards are typically laid out.

The screen added a useful dynamic. It added a layer of mystery. It would have been slightly different if the audience could see the symbols as painted and realize all options were available. The gimmick is to make it appear the body painters had to pick only one option and then the crowd amazingly picked the same option. Without the screen, that element goes away. There's still the "they deduced my card without seeing it", but not the amazement the other part adds.

That seems like a lot of work to turn into a regular act. The painting nightmare seems a challenge to take control. Sure, the problem solving aspect has been solved, but not the amount of paint in the air at one time.

The other challenge was the casino reveal trick. They did a good job of taking the casino's intent (surprise the guests) and rethinking the method to make it more impressive. I like the descriptions of the challenges of making the scenes work. They understood perspective and positioning to make the painted images on 3-D surfaces match the backgrounds. They mentioned the way the colors interact with the eye and understanding using white paint for the curved stripes even though the background was actually gold stripes. Those are the interesting tips that make the show intriguing. Finding poses the girls could repeatedly get into and hold for some time was also critical.

I was a little concerned with them sending the dealer away like that, until I learned they had a second dealer. Yeah, cutting up his legs was not a great start. Kudos to him for being okay with the idea, even if he botched the job.
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Old 11-20-2013, 04:26 PM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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Good show last night.

First off, Face Off did a special show on body painting, talking about the art form and styles and how it is taking off as an industry and stepping out of the kinky reputation to be more accepted.

They showed some stunning work and talked to body painting industry leaders.

They also interviewed past Face Off contestants who competed on body painting challenges. The first season had the big robe drop surprise. The winner on that season used the wrong paint and the paint actually was peeling and chipping while doing the prep, but she ended up fixing it and winning for transforming her model into a fishlady. The loser did some tribal patterns on a guy with a desert backdrop, pretty much missing the concept.

Season 2 was brought up, with the challenge to hide a model into the backdrop and have a second character interacting with the backdrop. The winners were highlighted, where they painted a lady into the backdrop of a shoe store, and had the guy bouncing a basketball. They used the lady's ass as the basketball painted up, and painted a basketball uniform on the guy. The real challenge was 15 minutes before they finished the task, the guy model got lightheaded and passed out and had to be rushed off by paramedics, so that contestant had to get a new model and start over with a new 6 hours. Then they superimposed his image over the other image for the final product. it won both for the concept integration and for the great work the guy contestant did blending the girl model into the backdrop, with shoe outlines to cover up.

The loser that round was the pair who had a black and white alley backdrop and tried to put a girl "tagging" the alley walls. They were very inexperienced body painters and struggled getting the colors, even though it was all grayscale.

Nix was a contestant that season, and got eliminated one competition prior to the body painting challenge where he would have excelled. But the very next day was when Red called him up from Naked Vegas to join her shop, and we see how that worked out for him.

While doing this presentation, they had the Naked Vegas team doing body painting on two models. One was woman they were making an artistic rendering of Medusa, the other was hiding a model against the paint shelf backdrop. So the ladies worked on Medusa while Nix and Wiser did the hide the model. It was neat to hear them talk about the actual techniques, of roughing out the lines, putting in the layers of paint to build up the shading, etc. Or how they approach finding the right consistent angle to pull off the masking trick. They went into a bit more detail than a standard Face Off show.

Anyway, that was an entertaining show, mostly connected because the Naked Vegas team did the work.

As for the actual episode, we once again faced two challenges.

The first one, Drew (the business manager guy) had a nephew taking anatomy and struggling with his grade, but got permission for an extra credit project with his lab mates. So they decided to make up the lab mates as the systems of the body for a presentation that the guy would then deliver. So they show up, and it's three hot young ladies and the guy. Now I know why he thought up that idea for the special project. "My lab mates are hot, I'd like to see them naked. Wait, my uncle works for a body painting company. SCORE!"

So they made up the three girls as the circulatory system, the muscle system, and the skeletal system. They painted the girls up as those diagrams, with half showing he healthy and half showing diseased and damaged.

Nix did skeletal and made an awesome skeleton, decked out so you could see "through" from the front to the back. He did the best skull paint I think I've seen. He did the ribcage where you could see through.

Heather and Red did the circulatory system, with the heart and liver and all the blood vessels on a white background.

Wiser did the muscular system with all the muscles and tendons and all drawn in.

The guy, meanwhile, had to work on his presentation as he would be giving the oral talk to discuss the systems. Except he started somehow confusing marrow and red blood cells.

So they got all made up and the uncle prepped his nephew, then they went to the presentation, which was held at the Luxor in the Body Works display, where actual cadavers were cut up and turned into artwork displaying the parts of the body. So they came out and modeled off the body systems for their class.

The second challenge was getting called out the the Stratosphere, which was going to host a publicity party for their new show, Pinup, starring 2011 Playboy Playmate of the year, Claire Sinclair. The casino execs wanted to do an out of this world theme and have 9 ladies painted up for the display, made up like planets.

So the team went to work designing planet art with lots of space theme backgrounds - nebulas, stars, comets, galaxies, etc. Basically some general space themed artwork to surround their planet details, which would be displayed on the ladies like a canvas. So they get started on their work, and have a very crowded shop working on 9 ladies at once.

Everything was going well, until the customers called up and told Red they wanted to change directions. The bigwigs didn't like the planet theme, and instead wanted "googies". That's apparently doing up 1950's style sci-fi concepts like the Jetsons. Talk about last minute redirection. So Red says they'll give them four models in that style, then they immediately have to dream up concepts and manufacture props out of random stuff they have in the shop. Amazingly they dream up some very cool props out of junk. Nix turns some lamp domes into a spacy glass helmet, and a couple of soda bottles into a cool oxygen tank system. Wiser converts some headphones into a spacy communications system with antennas and such. They dream up some plunging outfits in bright colors.

Also interesting was the technique to add 3-D elements. They apply some adhesive to extend shoulderpads and christmas ornaments to make headpieces and the like. Surprisingly they turned out really spectacular.

Two great sets of work.
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