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  #301  
Old 09-15-2019, 03:10 AM
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One thing my grandparents’ WWII generation seemed a lot more interested and concerned about than now was the ethnicity or religion of people. It was something they thought important to know and discuss; for example, if a family who was catholic moved in to the neighborhood, they would have been identified and appraised as the “the Catholic family” - with that characteristic given primary importance - whereas now I think somebody’s non-‘wasp’y qualifies would be an afterthought.
Yeah. As a kid in the 70s I remember that nasty vibe as well. I have a categorically non-"WASP-Y" surname and noticed even then some people were very....uh...hyper Anglo to the point that they seemed to exhibit an existential uneasiness as to the hegemony of their "culture". It was subtle in some ways, and not so much so in others. One of my best friend's mother was always very nice to me "on paper" but even then I sensed passive-aggressive bullshit overtones. She had a glass of wine or two, and WHOA!: Toxic. I might as well have had an organ grinder with a monkey on my shoulder.

Today seems much better in that regard, not only formative ethnicity, but the area of the country one is from. ( in this case, the US )

Last edited by BrickBat; 09-15-2019 at 03:15 AM.
  #302  
Old 09-15-2019, 05:23 AM
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Yeah, church was a big deal in post WWII suburbia. Looking at our family photos, you’d get the impression we were regular church goers, too. But, we only went to church on Easter Sundays and that coincided with the one day of the year we took family photos (the one day of the year my hair was combed and my face scrubbed).

Even one day a year was torture for me to attend church. I had to wear an itchy suit (herringbone to match my older brother’s suit). The wooden pews were a pain in the ass. I could never find the right page in the Bible. All that standing and sitting and kneeling was a chore, preventing me from taking a nap. I couldn’t even mouth the words to the hymns convincingly, garnering angry stares from Mom. And the minister kept yapping away for what seemed like an eternity in purgatory.

Sunday mornings were for fishing and catching bullfrogs. I believe God would have approved of me catching a big string of fish rather than sitting (and standing and kneeling) in church praising him. Didn’t his boy say something about the benefits of teaching a guy to fish?

Our next door neighbors were hard-core Catholics. They had 5 kids. I was friends with the two oldest boys and had a mad crush on the oldest daughter. Seems like they had something church-wise to do every day of the week. They kind of scared me.

Their walls were adorned with crosses, saints and pics of Mary. Why no pics of Jesus? Was he unphotogenic or something? They talked of catechism, Ave Maria, rosary beads and threw out football terms like, “Hail Mary.” This all seemed like things a coven of witches would do to my 7yo self.

I walked past the catholic school on my way to and from grammar school. All the boys looked like little Amway salesmen, but, I must say the girls looked pretty hot in their plaid uniforms—especially our neighbor’s oldest daughter.

They moved away when I was 12. I was taller than all 5 kids when they left. I met up with them many years later. I was now the shrimp among a family of giants—and I’m 6’3”. David: 6’6’; Brian: 6’7”; baby Conway: 6’11”. I wasn’t even taller than the girls any more.

I guess God made them grow closer to heaven as reward for all the church time they put in.
  #303  
Old 09-16-2019, 08:28 AM
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One thing my grandparents’ WWII generation seemed a lot more interested and concerned about than now was the ethnicity or religion of people.... back then it was more likely to be a shorthand for explaining how the person thought or acted.
The toughest part of traveling with my parents (born in the 20's) has always been my mom's obsession over anyone's ethnicity. And utterly wrong guesses, announced with loud stage whispers...

Waiting for a hotel clerk to finish with another customer? "Isn't her hair black? The Japanese have such shiny black hair." On a cruise? "Isn't that South American piano player wonderful?" European Restaurant? "Is that colored waiter going to bring us some bread? Oh, all right, buh-lack, or African-American, or whatever they want to be called now." My favorite was her guessing at even my kids' friends: "What a cute little Eskimo girl." Umm, mom, she's Asian. And it's really none of yo-"You really don't think she's Eskimo? Well, I think she's Eskimo."

Last edited by digs; 09-16-2019 at 08:30 AM.
  #304  
Old 09-16-2019, 10:53 AM
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Switching gears a bit, I just remembered a change that was underway during the 70's and 80's, but has progressed significantly since then:

Most businesses used to close on Sundays, and in many areas also part of an additional day. (When I moved to this area in the mid 70's there were still traces of Wednesday afternoon closures, though most places had given that up.) There were also very few businesses open late at night, and in some areas none at all. People took it for granted that there were times of day, and entire days, when you couldn't do some types of shopping.
  #305  
Old 09-16-2019, 12:21 PM
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I've noticed that too in particular with regards to gas stations. I remember several times on a road trip in the 80s to the mid 90s we needed to look hard for a gas station that was open in the middle of the night and we almost ran out of gas (especially if we had lost our way looking for a place that was off the interstate highway.)
  #306  
Old 09-16-2019, 12:25 PM
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But 3 years ago when hiking across the Cotswolds in England I found out that limited/no Sunday hours are still a thing in rural England. I was so slow that I passed through the only large town on Sunday at 4 pm and there was nothing open, not even the only supermarket.
  #307  
Old 09-18-2019, 10:54 AM
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I've noticed that too in particular with regards to gas stations. I remember several times on a road trip in the 80s to the mid 90s we needed to look hard for a gas station that was open in the middle of the night and we almost ran out of gas (especially if we had lost our way looking for a place that was off the interstate highway.)
Yeah, I remember that you needed to plan ahead for food and gas on a road trip. In today's world I don't even think about it, there's pretty much always going to be a 24 hour gas station (with card-operated pumps if not a person) within a few exits just about anywhere you drive, at least in the Southeast (may be different in the wide-open West). And you might have to go a little further for a 24-hour restaurant if you're in that 11pm-6am zone, but during the rest of the time you're going to catch at least one fast food place.
  #308  
Old 09-18-2019, 12:21 PM
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Oregon was looking at legislation to allow people to pump their own gas in rural areas. I don't know where this proposal has ended up at this point. For me when I was moving to Oregon, this would have prevented a night sleeping in the cab of a moving van waiting for a gas station near Burns to open.
  #309  
Old 09-18-2019, 09:10 PM
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Oregon was looking at legislation to allow people to pump their own gas in rural areas. I don't know where this proposal has ended up at this point. For me when I was moving to Oregon, this would have prevented a night sleeping in the cab of a moving van waiting for a gas station near Burns to open.
On a long fast trip a few days ago, we stopped at a Maverik in Baker City which, after some uncertainty, we determined to be self-service. It was nowhere identified as such (that I noticed, at least).

Speaking of which, I determined that Maverik is a station I will choose over others, if possible, because of one feature I observed in at least one location: their pumps have a mute button.
  #310  
Old 09-18-2019, 09:28 PM
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I determined that Maverik is a station I will choose over others, if possible, because of one feature I observed in at least one location: their pumps have a mute button.
Want want want!!

-- I've never seen a Maverik station. Different area, I suppose.

ETA: I remember when gas pumps just were mute. It was normal.

Last edited by thorny locust; 09-18-2019 at 09:29 PM.
  #311  
Old 09-18-2019, 11:30 PM
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Another one that's becoming a bit of a problem for me: people apparently don't use bar soap any more. Even in a big supermarket or big box store, there'll often only be a couple of options, usually ones that are mostly used for women washing their faces.
  #312  
Old 09-19-2019, 01:35 AM
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Want want want!!

-- I've never seen a Maverik station. Different area, I suppose.

ETA: I remember when gas pumps just were mute. It was normal.
Cripes! I'm living in a technological backwater. What do your gas pumps say?
  #313  
Old 09-19-2019, 05:46 AM
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Around me they mostly scream about the great snacks and other stuff to be had inside the convenience store, and occasionally play music or general interest news magazine stuff. When I run into one I jab around the screen looking for a mute button, and furthermore, never fill up at that store again. If I run into one while on a road trip, I will not run in for snacks if I had planned to, I will merely fill up and go and thus deprive the store of most of their profit.
  #314  
Old 09-19-2019, 07:02 AM
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Another one that's becoming a bit of a problem for me: people apparently don't use bar soap any more. Even in a big supermarket or big box store, there'll often only be a couple of options, usually ones that are mostly used for women washing their faces.
For years now I've been buying my Irish Spring bar soap on Amazon. I get 20 bars at a time. I must be awfully predictable, as every so often Amazon asks if I'd like to buy more soap. I check, and reply, "why yes I would, thank you.
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Old 09-19-2019, 08:35 AM
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Interesting. My family uses bar soap.
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Old 09-19-2019, 09:07 AM
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Adults riding bikes. When I was a kid, only kids rode bikes. When I hit 14, my mother sold my bike cause "You're too old to ride a bike."
  #317  
Old 09-19-2019, 09:12 AM
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Another one that's becoming a bit of a problem for me: people apparently don't use bar soap any more. Even in a big supermarket or big box store, there'll often only be a couple of options, usually ones that are mostly used for women washing their faces.
Maybe it's a regional thing? I've never had trouble finding bar soap at a supermarket or box store, and I've even seen it at convenience stores on the 'you forgot your travel bag didn't you' shelf. Pretty much any big box or supermarket will have several varieties of several major brands, plus often some obscure brand (like one of the all-natural ones).
  #318  
Old 09-19-2019, 09:13 AM
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I've been doing a lot of walking in the last while and it's striking to me how rare it is nowadays to see a pile of dog shit on the sidewalk or in a park. They used to be everywhere. This occurred to me yesterday as I maneuvered around an undisturbed mound in my path. It's been a dog's age since I had to do that.
  #319  
Old 09-19-2019, 09:21 AM
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Around me they mostly scream about the great snacks and other stuff to be had inside the convenience store, and occasionally play music or general interest news magazine stuff.
This, pretty much.

And the speakers are poor quality; so even if I'd otherwise like the particular music, it sounds terrible.

It's become way too common around here. And supermarket speakers doing basically the same thing are now pretty close to ubiquitous.


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I've never had trouble finding bar soap at a supermarket or box store
Here they've still got it; but the selection's minimal, and there often isn't any unscented. Most of the shelf space is taken up with expensive plastic-using pump bottles.
  #320  
Old 09-19-2019, 10:33 AM
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That's largely because of stereotypes, pushing gender roles, and the hostility of visible parts of various fandoms to female fans. Women have long been active in various fandoms, but a tendency for outside media to portray them as completely male hobbies and for large chunks of organized fandom to push women away and/or not acknowledge their existence leads to the appearance that no women are into these sort of things. Marion Zimmer Bradley was a major defender of Tolkein in articles going back to 1962, In 1981 Pat Nussman did an informal article about the lack of men in active Star Wars Fandom, https://fanlore.org/wiki/Where_the_Boys_Are . Even as far back as 1948 women made up 10-15% of science fiction authors, and Frankenstein (written by a woman) is often considered the first science fiction novel. The Sumerian Game in 1964 was one of the first computer strategy games and was written by a woman, one of the co-designers of Centipede Dona Bailey (1981, a popular arcade game) was female, as was Dani Berry the creator of MULE (1983, a popular multiplayer trading game). Dorothy Woolfolk was an editor at DC Comics as far back in the 1940s.
Appreciate the insights - I did not know that about MULE, a game I played relentlessly.

And I know... now... that my 12yo assumptions were just culturally ingrained bullshit, but there was also a lot of culturally ingrained bullshit (which you noted) which kept 12yo females in 1981 from wanting to express an interest in these things.

Last edited by JohnT; 09-19-2019 at 10:33 AM.
  #321  
Old 09-19-2019, 10:39 AM
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I don't know if this is "small, subtle", but in another thread, I note that this past Monday marked the 40th anniversary of the release of "Rapper's Delight", a song which introduced an art form which just murdered the f*** out of rock and roll's then-domination of the music and culture scene. And to think we teenaged rock 'n rollers were worried about disco!
  #322  
Old 09-19-2019, 11:31 AM
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Switching gears a bit, I just remembered a change that was underway during the 70's and 80's, but has progressed significantly since then:

Most businesses used to close on Sundays, and in many areas also part of an additional day. (When I moved to this area in the mid 70's there were still traces of Wednesday afternoon closures, though most places had given that up.) There were also very few businesses open late at night, and in some areas none at all. People took it for granted that there were times of day, and entire days, when you couldn't do some types of shopping.
Not sure where "upstate" you are...in my NY-state community there are a number of stores that shut at about 1 or 2 pm on Saturday and don't reopen till Monday morning. These tend to be independently owned stories selling things that are also available in chain stores. I'm thinking specifically here of the hardware store around the corner, the barber shop two streets over, and the pharmacy across town, all of which do a good solid business despite being closed for three fourths of the weekend, while the Home Depots, SuperCutses, and RiteAids all remain open all day Saturday and much of Sunday too. My car repair place also shuts down at noon at Saturday, but I think that's more common. (Also, the bank.) --Anyway, interesting to think about.
  #323  
Old 09-19-2019, 12:29 PM
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Finger Lakes.

There are still some businesses that close early Saturday and/or are closed all day Sunday; but (with exception below) they're decreasing. Some of the local hardware stores are now open not only Saturday afternoon, but part of Sunday.

Somewhat in the other direction, the number of businesses run by Old-Order Mennonites and Amish has increased, and they're definitely closed on Sunday, as well as on their religious holidays.
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Old 09-19-2019, 01:12 PM
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And when I drive through Western NY, I haven't done that enough lately to know if there are limited hours, but there does seem to be a culture of old-school convenience stores that don't have open bathrooms in them. I say "culture" because a few years ago I was driving along Highway 5 toward Buffalo and had to use the restroom so stopped at quite a few places and none of them had a bathroom, and I would have bought gas there too but did not, until I saw a 7/11 (interestingly without a gas station attached to it) and thought "7/11's ALWAYS have bathrooms" but not this one: maybe they figured no one else has one so why should we? Took me until almost Buffalo to find a new-school large gas station that did have a bathroom.
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Old 09-19-2019, 03:32 PM
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Jukeboxes. They used to be everywhere, but I see them less and less. Pinball machines and arcade games too.
There are still jukeboxes, but they're internet connected and don't have records in them
  #326  
Old 09-19-2019, 03:45 PM
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Powder detergents are almost gone from my local supermarket. All the store sells is liquid and pods. They still have a limited supply of Tide powder and Seventh Generation powder, but that's it. My mother, who is 90, only uses powder, and it's becoming harder to find.
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Old 09-19-2019, 10:38 PM
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Powder detergents are almost gone from my local supermarket...
And what about tooth powder? My grandmother never used paste, she must have had a cache of vintage metal Pepsodent shakers. She'd shake a little pile into her hand, wet it and scrub it into her toothbrush.


Whoa, you can still get it on Amazon in Colgate flavor...

ETA: Hmmm, looking closely, the Amazon tooth powder shaker is rusty on its base... maybe they're selling vintage tins.

Last edited by digs; 09-19-2019 at 10:40 PM.
  #328  
Old 09-19-2019, 10:46 PM
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Another car-related one: They don't leak oil like they used to. In vintage aerial photos of freeways you see a dark oil stripe all the way along the lanes; similarly every parking spot had a dark smudge.

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  #329  
Old 09-20-2019, 12:04 AM
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Are you sure it wasn't KLondike 5-? KL-5 maps to good old 555. While HOllywood-5 maps to 465.



In Play It Again, Sam, Tony Roberts' character is always using a pay phone to call his office to let them know where he was and tells them the pay phone number. Lot of KL-5's IIRC.
I'm also surprised they used a HOllywood exchange, which was a real exchange used not only in Hollywood California, but also in many places around the country. HOllywood was one of a standardized set of alpha exchange names implemented by Bell and designed to be accurately heard and understood by those using the system.

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  #330  
Old 09-20-2019, 12:39 AM
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My favorite is that in the 1970s you called places
I don't know how accurate this was, but on the OTR Dragnet program, Sargeant Friday and his partner would be out questioning a witness or victim, and somebody at their office would call them there. "It's for you", the interviewee would say, as if having your phone ring for someone you had never seen in your life until ten minutes before was the most natural thing in the world.


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  #331  
Old 09-20-2019, 12:53 AM
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Powder detergents are almost gone from my local supermarket. All the store sells is liquid and pods. They still have a limited supply of Tide powder and Seventh Generation powder, but that's it. My mother, who is 90, only uses powder, and it's becoming harder to find.
True that. I was looking for dishwasher powder recently, and most dishwasher soaps were pods. They did have a couple of choices of powders, and I bought one, but I guess I'll have to switch over eventually.
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Old 09-20-2019, 04:27 AM
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How about those 10-10-xyz long distance numbers? Anyone remember them? I guess they were in the 90s, but they seem to be gone now.
Yeah, since someone else mentioned calling his GF off-hours in the early 80s, the 10-10 numbers (or discount calling cards) was how I called my GF in the late 90s. I also sold (and made a decent amount of money and recurring commissions for several years) dial-around and bundled phone services.
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Old 09-20-2019, 04:29 AM
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Bottled water has been mentioned, but what about Snapple? When did bottled Kool-Aid for grownups become so popular?

I wish I had thought up that idea.
The Snapple lady peaked in popularity almost 30 years ago.
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Old 09-20-2019, 07:39 AM
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Another car-related one: They don't leak oil like they used to. In vintage aerial photos of freeways you see a dark oil stripe all the way along the lanes; similarly every parking spot had a dark smudge.

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Good one. And somewhere along the line they vastly improved the quality of the paint jobs. I never feel the need to wax my eight year old car, which is not garage kept. The cars I had 40 years ago dulled and rusted without constant maintenance.
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Old 09-20-2019, 08:29 AM
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Here they've still got it; but the selection's minimal, and there often isn't any unscented. Most of the shelf space is taken up with expensive plastic-using pump bottles.
Maybe it's a regional thing... here, every grocery store/drugstore/Wal-Mart has a decent choice of bar soaps- last time I bought some (a few weeks back), they had several varieties each of Dial, Caress, Dove (men and women varieties), and Irish Spring, as well as some more random varieties- Ivory and Safeguard come to mind.

I can't say that I've seen a bar of Lifebuoy, Shield or Camay in a long time, but that's been decades, not like a few years.
  #336  
Old 09-20-2019, 03:57 PM
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Powder detergents are almost gone from my local supermarket. All the store sells is liquid and pods. They still have a limited supply of Tide powder and Seventh Generation powder, but that's it. My mother, who is 90, only uses powder, and it's becoming harder to find.
Look on the internets for the recipe. Apparently it is pretty easy stuff to mix up, for bajillions less than you pay for the boxed product. At the store I go to (a small regional chain of cavernous grocery stores), they at least have Fels Naptha and washing soda, two of the primary ingredients in most recipes. I went looking for Mrs. Stewart's Bluing and that was the place that had it – too niche for the big chains, I guess.
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Old 09-20-2019, 04:47 PM
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I don't know how accurate this was, but on the OTR Dragnet program, Sargeant Friday and his partner would be out questioning a witness or victim, and somebody at their office would call them there. "It's for you", the interviewee would say, as if having your phone ring for someone you had never seen in your life until ten minutes before was the most natural thing in the world.
Perry Mason was rife with this, probably at least once an episode. Perry and Paul Drake did have (pre-cellular) car phones, though I'm sure having Della or Paul call Perry at a witness's number was cheaper than calling his mobile number.
  #338  
Old 09-21-2019, 01:23 AM
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For that matter, here in the U.S., men's suits are certainly far less common now. Up until the 1990s, business attire was the norm in professional environments; many businesses which had been "business attire" fairly rapidly changed over to "business casual" 20 years ago, more or less. Certainly, there are still some professions and firms which expect men to wear suits, but even then, it's often been loosened -- for example, many lawyers now only wear a suit and tie when they actually go to the courthouse.

A generation or so ago, most men probably owned at least a single suit, which they wore to weddings and funerals, if nothing else. What I've observed is that, while this may still be the case with the upper-middle-class and above, I suspect that many men, now, don't own a single suit (nor a tie).

Case in point: two years ago, I went to a memorial service for the mother of two friends of mine, in a small town in northeastern Wisconsin. As my wife and I discussed what we'd wear, I said, "well, I'm going to wear a suit, because it's a memorial service, and that's what I do. But, other than me, I will guarantee that you'll only see one other suit there -- Brad (one of the sons of the deceased) will be in a suit, because he's a sharp dresser, but that'll be it...and you'll see at least one person wearing something with a Packers logo on it." My prediction was exactly right, down to the Packers logos.
This shows to me that the Dope demographic really skews old. Since wearing a suit or at least jacket and tie has become more fashionable in recent years.
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Old 09-21-2019, 09:13 AM
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Speaking of soaps, all natural soap is now common and sold with the regular stuff. I recent went totally whackadoodle when the store I worked at got a huge shipment of method soap--all natural, scented with oils and not chemicals. When some co-workers smelt it, they all smelt the difference and bought some.

And three of them each gave me a free bottle for doing it!
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Old 09-21-2019, 09:34 AM
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Has anybody mentioned that blue hair used to be confined to little old white ladies?
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Old 09-21-2019, 12:12 PM
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Has anybody mentioned that blue hair used to be confined to little old white ladies?
And anime characters.

Back then I thought blue hair on old women was weird. Now I find it more amusing. If you're going grey why stick to natural colors, of humans, when you have the entire rainbow to choose from? But if you're tampering it's rare to get the exact right color and hue to match your complexion.


Speaking of hair, it's hard to comprehend how popular Perms were. Probably the biggest laugh I ever got from That 70's Show was in the first episode they pan up to the face of the wacky neighbour to show his wild man-perm.

But then I was once a proud member of Mullet Nation. It wasn't a lifestyle choice back then. It was just one of stock haircuts that barbers did.
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Old 09-21-2019, 12:36 PM
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Well, you have to dye your hair when it loses color, otherwise everyone will see all your grey matter trying desperately to escape.
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Old 09-21-2019, 01:22 PM
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Has anybody mentioned that blue hair used to be confined to little old white ladies?
I remember in the late 80s VH-1 wanted to brand themselves as the video channel for adults who still liked contemporary music and one of their ads was "we're not the channel for people with blue hair" and showed a little old lady, then "and we're also not the channel for people with blue hair" and showed a blinged-out punk.
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Old 09-21-2019, 02:15 PM
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And anime characters.

Speaking of hair, it's hard to comprehend how popular Perms were. Probably the biggest laugh I ever got from That 70's Show was in the first episode they pan up to the face of the wacky neighbour to show his wild man-perm.
Bob’s “poodle’s ass” haircut.
  #345  
Old 09-21-2019, 03:02 PM
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Women in public with their hair in curlers. (Presumably now they use curling irons.) I remember my mother telling me never to do that. (By the way, she never told me not to drink or smoke, not that I ever did.)
  #346  
Old 09-21-2019, 03:46 PM
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ETA: Hmmm, looking closely, the Amazon tooth powder shaker is rusty on its base... maybe they're selling vintage tins.
Here you go:

https://www.lehmans.com/product/uncl...rsonal-hygiene

Don't think something's made any longer? Lehman's may have it. If they don't, try the Vermont Country Store.
  #347  
Old 09-21-2019, 04:27 PM
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Another one that's becoming a bit of a problem for me: people apparently don't use bar soap any more. Even in a big supermarket or big box store, there'll often only be a couple of options, usually ones that are mostly used for women washing their faces.
Bar soap is another thing that Millenials are supposedly killing off; if so I don't blame them a bit. Bar soap is messy and the soap dish you need for it takes up a lot more room on the bathroom counter than a container of liquid soap.

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Old 09-21-2019, 06:15 PM
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Here you go:



https://www.lehmans.com/product/uncl...rsonal-hygiene



Don't think something's made any longer? Lehman's may have it. If they don't, try the Vermont Country Store.
I get my safety razor blades from VCS.

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  #349  
Old 09-22-2019, 01:38 AM
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I don't think these have been mentioned yet:

Interest in horse racing is fading. Not many young people go to the track any more. There aren't as many racetracks as there used to be. The recent problems of horse deaths at Santa Anita will probably accelerate the trend.

Bowling is also not as popular as it once was. When I was a kid there used to be bowling alleys all over the place. Now there are just a few in the East Bay, where I live.

Miniature golf seems to have faded, as well.

It used to be common for people to carry matches or lighters. This was handy for things like lighting charcoal and campfires: all you had to do was ask if anyone had a match, and someone almost always did. Now you have to remember to bring your own.

Organ meats used to be more common. You'd find liver (both beef and chicken), kidneys, hearts, tripe, tongue, etc. at the meat counter at just about any grocery store. Many stores today carry only muscle meats. Also, I remember when they used to have coarsely-ground beef for chili. When was the last time you saw that? Or cube steak? On the other hand, it's a lot easier to get ground turkey or chicken than it used to be.

Are there any full-service gas stations left? The places that would wash your windshield and check your oil while filling your tank?

Some things that used to be common have disappeared completely, like tube testers and cigarette vending machines.
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Old 09-22-2019, 03:13 AM
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But 3 years ago when hiking across the Cotswolds in England I found out that limited/no Sunday hours are still a thing in rural England. I was so slow that I passed through the only large town on Sunday at 4 pm and there was nothing open, not even the only supermarket.
Not just a rural thing; it's still the law here that most shops over a certain size can only open for a maximum of 6 hours on a Sunday, and have to be closed by 6pm. Most opt for 10am-4pm, so you timed that badly.

Although they don't have to, many smaller shops keep roughly the same hours, presumably on the grounds that when the big shops shut, the high street quietens right down. There's usually a convenience store (chains like Spar, plus most of the supermarkets have mini branches sized just small enough to fall into the 'small shop' category) open somewhere in any decent size town until 10pm or so, but they're often tucked away in the middle of a residential area rather than on the high street.

There's occasional talk of dropping the rule as old fashioned, but obviously the convenience store chains like the law as it is, as do quite a lot of supermarket workers, as it gives them a time to do stuff like clean and change displays in peace without customers around that head office can't take away.

Anyway, regarding the main topic; kiddie ice creams.

When I was a kid in the 80s, and well into the 90s when I worked in a gift shop, it was absolutely standard to have a choice of cheap ice creams and ice lollies for kids; ones that were maybe 1/4 the price and size of the adult size ones. They'd be the big sellers, 'cos why pay for a big ice cream that a little kid will only eat half of then feel sick?

Now, the same place I worked at then only stocks one type of cheap one, and that's only because my Mum, who does the ordering, insists on having one cheap option. It barely sells. Almost everyone buys the big ones, regardless of the size of the kid they're buying for. Oddly the number of people complaining about the price of the ice creams has also plummeted, even though the price has shot up compared to inflation.
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