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Old 02-11-2017, 10:11 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Any Mustard Connosiours Here?

Sorry about the spelling, but I believe you know what I meant to write.....

I have long held the belief that true mustard cannot be bought off the shelves of any supermarket, but that one must be willing to pay a bit extra for the "real thing" which comes from?..... France? Dijonne?

Here in America, it's my belief that the so-called "Dijonne" mustard is mixed with mayonnaise and only simulates the "bite" one experiences with the true product.

Waiting on the question, right?

Do any of you import it, and what "brand" do you recommend?

Also, how did mustard "gas" originate?

Thanks and if this has been answered elsewhere, I apologize for putting y'all through this ordeal again!

Q
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  #2  
Old 02-12-2017, 12:28 PM
NotherYinzer NotherYinzer is offline
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Try these guys: The National Mustard Museum.
  #3  
Old 02-12-2017, 12:43 PM
QuickSilver QuickSilver is offline
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Trader Joe's has some delicious mustards. Two in particular are a French style herbed dijon and a truffle dijon. Neither one has anything on the ingredient list that would indicate it's mixed with mayo of any kind.

When making sauces, I go with the traditional fine ground, country or coarse ground Maille dijon mustard.

But I'm not above using French's yellow on a hot dog. In fact, I prefer it.

Also enjoy sweet hot mustard on chicken strips.
  #4  
Old 02-12-2017, 01:22 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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The best plain yellow mustard I've had up to this point is Portland Mustard. It's addictive. For imported, I'd say German mustards are hard to beat and come in varieties from mild senf to HOLY SHIT!
  #5  
Old 02-12-2017, 01:28 PM
Cardigan Cardigan is offline
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I tend to prefer German mustards. Lowensenf extra hot is great with knockwurst
  #6  
Old 02-12-2017, 02:01 PM
Ennui Ennui is offline
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I have a soft spot in my heart for Bertman's Original Ball Park Mustard out of Cleveland. It's said that through the 70s and 80s that mustard sold more tickets to Indian's games than the team did and that isn't too much of an exaggeration.
  #7  
Old 02-12-2017, 02:06 PM
Two Many Cats Two Many Cats is offline
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I prefer French's over Plochman's. I understand that's considered gauche.
  #8  
Old 02-12-2017, 03:36 PM
The King of Soup The King of Soup is offline
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Mustard is a plant, the seeds of which can be ground up and mixed with lots of other stuff to create prepared mustard. The differences in prepared mustards are due to what and how much which kind of ground mustard seed was diluted. With. Completely lost control of that last sentence. Anyhow, you can grow your own mustard, or just buy mustard seed, and experiment until you find a recipe you like. Kind of an inexpensive and rewarding hobby, now that I think of it: I may try it myself.

Mustard oil is caustic and toxic in concentrated form and is what mustard gas was made out of.
  #9  
Old 02-12-2017, 03:38 PM
california jobcase california jobcase is offline
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Well, French's over Plochman's is forgivable, but using Heinz mustard outside of a restaurant where one is forced to is unforgivable. BTW, has anyone tried French's ketchup?
  #10  
Old 02-12-2017, 03:39 PM
Asympotically fat Asympotically fat is offline
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If you go to England, one thing to keep in mind is that traditional English mustard is one of the hottest mustards in the world. This catches me out as French and American style mustards are quite quite common and if you accidentally smother something in English mustard it's not the most pleasant experience!
  #11  
Old 02-12-2017, 03:41 PM
Gatopescado Gatopescado is offline
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Can't live without Coleman's. When people ask me what I want for Christmas, I say, "A big can of Coleman's".
  #12  
Old 02-12-2017, 04:07 PM
brujaja brujaja is offline
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The best mustard I've ever tasted was some whole-seed garlic mustard my parents got at a wine & cheese festival somewhere up in Marin county. It was probably very similar to this.
  #13  
Old 02-12-2017, 05:09 PM
Ambivalid Ambivalid is online now
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We need to hear from mean mr mustard.
  #14  
Old 02-12-2017, 06:15 PM
Marion_Wormer Marion_Wormer is offline
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Cherchie's Champagne Mustard. ... Divine
  #15  
Old 02-12-2017, 06:31 PM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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Any Mustard Connosiours Here?

My wife would qualify.


mmm



(thanks for the thought, Ambi)
  #16  
Old 02-13-2017, 02:48 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is online now
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I like a bit of mustard - I don't know that I really have a favourite brand or type - as with many things, I like variety, and I won't turn my nose up at the 'base' commercial presentations of the product - they can all be appreciated in their own ways.

If I have a preference, it will probably be toward the 'wholegrain' types of mustard because they add a bit of texture and complexity of flavour, as well as delivering a bit of heat, but there are also times when chemical-weapons-grade 'fairground' yellow mustard, hot enough to sear your face right off, is the best thing in the world. Horses for courses.

I guess probably the most interesting mustard I've tasted is the one I made myself from wild-gathered Hedge Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) seeds - it was intensely 'earthy' and complex in flavour, and completely unlike anything I've ever been able to buy. Not the best *quality* mustard, but the most unusual and interesting experience, I would say.
http://atomicshrimp.com/post/2013/07...-Mustard-Seeds
  #17  
Old 02-13-2017, 03:03 AM
MickNickMaggies MickNickMaggies is offline
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Alsatian horseradish mustard. Usually made with local white wine.

I can still taste it. And we still drink out of the mustard jars. But they look like this- http://www.boutique-alsacienne-mulho...ace-280-g-.jpg
  #18  
Old 02-13-2017, 08:54 AM
Asimovian Asimovian is offline
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Moderator Note

Squirted on over to Cafe Society from IMHO.
  #19  
Old 02-13-2017, 09:06 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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I never thought of myself as a mustard connoisseur, but looking in the fridge right now I see nine different mustards. Yikes. Coleman's is there, along with El Diablo Mango, Simply Supreme Sriracha, an organic spicy brown, Crazy Carl's Maple Mustard, and Inglehoffer Sweet Hot (with honey).

I might need to attend meetings.
  #20  
Old 02-13-2017, 09:12 AM
Barkis is Willin' Barkis is Willin' is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cardigan View Post
I tend to prefer German mustards. Lowensenf extra hot is great with knockwurst
I was also going to recommend Lowensenf. I bring back tubes of it whenever I go to Germany. Then I found out there's a store called World Market that imports it here. Have not bought it from them yet, but nice to know it's available.
  #21  
Old 02-13-2017, 11:35 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Two Many Cats View Post
I prefer French's over Plochman's. I understand that's considered gauche.
I use French's, Plochmann's, and Heinz pretty much interchangeably. I like Plochmann's because it's local, but I can't stand their bottle, which always gunks up on me and, even if it doesn't, becomes a bit difficult to squeeze and get the last 1/4 bottle of mustard out. It's all yellow mustard--I couldn't pick them out of a lineup unless I prepared beforehand (and I'm not sure even then.)

My favorite mustard fir sandwiches is Kosciusko. Nice zippy tang to it, whole, small grained seeds, no sweetness, medium mustard bite. I have no idea if it's distributed beyond Chicagoland, but it's fairly common here. It's the mustard I grew up with.

When I get the craving for some pure mustard heat, I go for the Colman's.

Last edited by pulykamell; 02-13-2017 at 11:37 AM.
  #22  
Old 02-13-2017, 01:40 PM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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Originally Posted by Asimovian View Post
Squirted on over to Cafe Society from IMHO.
Ew.


mmm
  #23  
Old 02-13-2017, 01:43 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Ennui already beat me to the recommendation of Bertman's Ballpark Mustard (there's another Cleveland brand of stadium mustard that's nearly as good, but Bertman's is the best). That stuff is God's gift to hot dogs and other sausages, and when I lived out of state, I had to bring back a couple of bottles every time I came home to visit.

Asympotically fat's warning about British mustards is especially apt, given that they look almost identical to the plain boring yellow mustard that's so common in the US. An unwary American could easily be misled by that visual similarity.

And while American dijon mustard isn't mixed with mayo, there is an American product called "dijonnaise" that is a mixture of the two. That might be the root of the OP's confusion.
  #24  
Old 02-13-2017, 01:48 PM
DoctorJ DoctorJ is offline
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Asheville's Lusty Monk. I keep all three varieties in my fridge, and when I run low I know it's time to plan a trip to Asheville.
  #25  
Old 02-13-2017, 02:00 PM
BeeGee BeeGee is offline
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I'm no Dorothy Sayers, but I do love mustard.
http://dianeduane.com/outofambit/201...othy-l-sayers/

My favorite is Silver Spring Beer and Brat mustard. It's just about perfect.
  #26  
Old 02-13-2017, 02:04 PM
swampspruce swampspruce is offline
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Te best grainy mustard I've ever eaten has been Vieux de Pommery. I pretty much ate an entire large jar in 6 months. Amazing with a cheese board or charcuterie.
I'm big on Keen's for hot mustard.
  #27  
Old 02-14-2017, 03:19 AM
Jeff Lichtman Jeff Lichtman is offline
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I came in here to recommend Bertman's Ballpark Mustard, and was pleased to see that two people beat me to the punch. The stuff really is great.

Chinese mustard is almost as hot as English mustard. Both will blow the top of your head off.
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  #28  
Old 02-14-2017, 11:56 AM
salinqmind salinqmind is offline
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Lakeshore Whole Grain Mustard with Stout (or with Guiness) is just that, whole mustard seeds, deliciously crunchy on a sandwich. I really love, though, Mister Mustard , Hot and/or Sweet Hot. Heavenly!
  #29  
Old 02-14-2017, 12:52 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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My first encounter with Colman's.
  #30  
Old 02-14-2017, 01:10 PM
GreenWyvern GreenWyvern is offline
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You can always buy plain mustard powder, and mix it up yourself, as my dad always did.

Otherwise, I use Coleman's Hot English Mustard. Everything else tastes insipid, like mustard-flavoured mayonnaise. :-)
  #31  
Old 02-14-2017, 04:36 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Personally, I find English mustard much hotter than Chinese. Many Chinese mustards, I can barely even tell that they're hot at all. I think, though, that they might just be getting their heat from a different spice, one which for whatever reason I happen to be less sensitive to.
  #32  
Old 02-14-2017, 05:29 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
Personally, I find English mustard much hotter than Chinese. Many Chinese mustards, I can barely even tell that they're hot at all. I think, though, that they might just be getting their heat from a different spice, one which for whatever reason I happen to be less sensitive to.
As far as I know, they all just get their heat from mustard seeds. If you want to make your own, just combine equal parts mustard powder and water and wait 15 minutes. This'll give you a pretty hefty kick, no matter what mustard powder you use.
  #33  
Old 02-14-2017, 06:00 PM
Dag Otto Dag Otto is offline
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I like Edmond Fallot mustard. The Dijon is good on steak.
  #34  
Old 02-14-2017, 06:06 PM
Mangetout Mangetout is online now
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Originally Posted by GreenWyvern View Post
You can always buy plain mustard powder, and mix it up yourself, as my dad always did.
If you do, mix it the day before you want it - it takes a while for the heat to develop properly.
  #35  
Old 02-14-2017, 06:19 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Mangetout View Post
If you do, mix it the day before you want it - it takes a while for the heat to develop properly.
IF you're just doing mustard + water 15 minutes is enough, and then it dissipates.
  #36  
Old 02-14-2017, 06:25 PM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is online now
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All types of mustard. My choice would depend on the dish really. Basic French's yellow mustard is just perfect on a hot dog with onions and relish on a white bread bun. I love the grainier mustards on other meats and sandwiches. Inglehoffer stone ground is a favorite. Honey mustard makes a nice salad dressing or dip on occasion, but I often find them too sweet. But hot mustard like the kind you get from Chinese restaurants on an eggroll is fantastic! I haven't tried any fancy mustards, but I'm game.
  #37  
Old 02-14-2017, 07:31 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
Personally, I find English mustard much hotter than Chinese. Many Chinese mustards, I can barely even tell that they're hot at all. I think, though, that they might just be getting their heat from a different spice, one which for whatever reason I happen to be less sensitive to.
You might just be eating at lousy Chinese places. As puly has mentioned, mustard powder + water + 15 minutes and you have sinus-clearing mustard. If the mustard you get doesn't do that, it's old.
  #38  
Old 02-14-2017, 07:37 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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You might just be eating at lousy Chinese places.
Certainly possible, though the folks I was eating with found them plenty hot enough for their tastes. And I'm also highly tolerant of horseradish and wasabi, which I think are the same active ingredient as mustard. But I was still impressed by the heat of English mustard when I tried it (not overwhelmed, but impressed).
  #39  
Old 02-15-2017, 06:37 AM
bibliophage bibliophage is offline
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The best I've had is Raye's stone-ground Old World Gourmet mustard out of Eastport, Maine. It can be hard to find outside New England.

Among brands readily available nationwide, I like Kosciusko spicy brown.
  #40  
Old 02-15-2017, 09:37 PM
Dr_Paprika Dr_Paprika is offline
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I loves me some mustard. Don't know if that makes me a connossieur.

Grocery stores have greatly improved over the years and I disagree a good store would not have tasty mustard. I mean, it's easy to make. Use Canadian seed, good vinegar, maybe some wine or wine vinegar, add tarragon or wasabi or horseradish.

I like the spicy German senf, the extra hot Colman's, anything made by Maille -- which any grocery store here would have. Extra hot Dijons and old fashioned (excellent glaze on salmon, lamb or pork) are appreciated. French's is just okay. I didn't find Plochmanns that distinctive, but only used a few times. Honey mustards don't do it for me.
  #41  
Old 02-15-2017, 11:13 PM
mistymage mistymage is offline
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I grew up with Boetje's so that's what we use other than the occasional plain yellow mustard. We've tried other coarse ground mustards but they just don't have the flavor we like. http://www.boetjesmustard.com/
  #42  
Old 02-16-2017, 03:03 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is online now
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
IF you're just doing mustard + water 15 minutes is enough, and then it dissipates.
Interesting - my experience doesn't match that, but I'm not going to dispute those results.

It may vary with the type and particle size of the ground mustard (mine is usually coarse). IMO, next day is not discernibly 'off peak' for heat, and incidentally allows enough time for development of the 'non-heat' flavours.
  #43  
Old 02-16-2017, 07:40 AM
Two Many Cats Two Many Cats is offline
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I have a cookbook with a recipe for Friesian Mustard Soup. It's a seafood chowder in a mustard cream base. You can really savor the mustard, and it never lasts long around my place.

Dang, now I want some.
  #44  
Old 02-16-2017, 03:22 PM
butler1850 butler1850 is offline
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For what it's worth, it's dead easy to make yourself. Penzey's will sell nearly a pound of brown mustard seeds for under $13.50. Yellow seeds are a little over a pound for the same price.

Some salt, vinegar and flavorings are all you need to make some amazing mustard at home.

The bags mentioned above are 3 cups, which hydrate to 3-4x their volume. I've re-hydrated in beer, wine or just straight vinegar. All give slightly differences in flavor. Once hydrated, put it in a blender and whiz it up until it's the texture you want.

Add salt to taste, add flavorings to taste (onion powder, garlic powder, herbs, cayenne, any or all). Add more vinegar or other liquid to get it to the consistency you want. Add mustard powder (or more seeds) if it's too thin or want more mustard flavor/heat.

As long as I'm using a high proportion of vinegar, I can any that I don't want to store in the fridge with a simple hot water pack. Clean mason jars into my canning pot, process at a boil for 20 minutes.
  #45  
Old 02-16-2017, 03:56 PM
Left Hand of Dorkness Left Hand of Dorkness is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DoctorJ View Post
Asheville's Lusty Monk. I keep all three varieties in my fridge, and when I run low I know it's time to plan a trip to Asheville.
That's what I was going to mention, too! I don't eat a ton of mustard (mostly on the fancy sandwiches I make every couple of weeks), so a jar lasts me a long time--but Lusty Monk mustard is my go-to mustard.
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