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  #151  
Old 07-31-2009, 11:18 AM
palindromemordnilap palindromemordnilap is offline
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1) As a kid I had a joke book with this riddle:

How do you get down from an elephant?
You don't, you get down from a duck.

For decades I thought it was very dry humor along the lines of "Don't do something difficult, do something easy" -- and they used a duck because it's a funny word.

2) For 10 years I worked at a building where one of the other cars had the vanity plate XANITAX, and I always wondered if it referred to a tax accountant, or pharmaceutical sales, or what? When I finally got it, I felt particularly stupid because

SPOILER:
My sister's name is Anita.

Last edited by palindromemordnilap; 07-31-2009 at 11:19 AM..
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  #152  
Old 07-31-2009, 11:23 AM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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For the longest time, I could not understand the lyrics to Givin' the Dog a Bone, by AC/DC. Sounded mostly like a bunch of screaming and grunting. It wasn't until one day when I read the lyrics that I saw it was about getting a blowjob from a girl.
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  #153  
Old 07-31-2009, 11:28 AM
BiblioCat BiblioCat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by palindromemordnilap View Post
1) As a kid I had a joke book with this riddle:

How do you get down from an elephant?
You don't, you get down from a duck.

For decades I thought it was very dry humor along the lines of "Don't do something difficult, do something easy" -- and they used a duck because it's a funny word.
I didn't get that joke for an embarassingly long time. I just never made the connection as a kid. Fast-forward to high school - a group of us were goofing around, telling stupid jokes. Someone told that one, I looked down at my down vest, and it suddenly hit me. Ooooooooh, I get it!
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  #154  
Old 07-31-2009, 11:33 AM
palindromemordnilap palindromemordnilap is offline
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On the Rush song "Spirit of Radio," there is a couplet at the end, set apart from the rest of the song. I always knew these two lines were a take-off of "The Sound of Silence"* lines:

And the words of the prophet were written on the subway walls, and tenant halls/
whispered in the sound of silence" (a previous line had used the word "echoed")

So I get partial credit for making that conenction. But the first 1,000 times or so I heard the Rush song I heard the lyrics as:

"For the words of the profits were written on the stadium wall, and concert hall/
And echoes with the sound of salesmen."

It wasn't until I heard a Rush tribute band sing the song live that I discovered the word was "studio", not "stadium". Which in the context of the song makes more sense.

And yes, I got that Rush changed "prophets" to "profits".

*Also known as "Sounds of Silence" but I prefer the singular version and apparently either is correct.
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  #155  
Old 07-31-2009, 11:34 AM
palindromemordnilap palindromemordnilap is offline
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Originally Posted by BiblioCat View Post
I didn't get that joke for an embarassingly long time. I just never made the connection as a kid. Fast-forward to high school - a group of us were goofing around, telling stupid jokes. Someone told that one, I looked down at my down vest, and it suddenly hit me. Ooooooooh, I get it!
High school? You beat me by about 15 years.
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  #156  
Old 07-31-2009, 11:46 AM
Nom_de_Plume Nom_de_Plume is offline
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I guess I was pretty young when Cheap Trick first came out with Surrender. I remember hearing the line "Just the other day I heard of a Soldier's falling off.." and wondering what the Soldier fell off of.
Then recently I heard the song on Jack FM and "Of course, THAT'S what fell off!"
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  #157  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:08 PM
Chronos Chronos is online now
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Quoth rowrrbazzle:
Quote:
Sometime in the past year I realized something about "West Side Story". The notes for the word "Maria" in the song of that name, C-F#-G, are the same notes as on the phrase "Who knows?" in "Something's Coming" with the last two notes in a lower octave. In addition, the opening 3 notes of the musical, G-C-F#, are the same, just starting on the G instead of the C.
Along a similar vein, in Man of La Mancha, Aldonza's song (I was born in a ditch to a mother who left me there...) is basically the same tune as Don Quixote's song (I am I, Don Quixote, the Lord of La Mancha...), but much more musically ornate. It's a sort of musical commentary on the fact that Aldonza is living in the real world, with all of its detail, while Don Quixote is living in an overly-simplistic fantasy world.
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  #158  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:21 PM
JohnT JohnT is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by palindromemordnilap View Post
1) As a kid I had a joke book with this riddle:

How do you get down from an elephant?
You don't, you get down from a duck.
The riddle that haunted, yes, haunted me for years was:

"If April showers bring May flowers, what do May flowers bring?"

Answer? Pilgrims!

I think I figured this one out about 10 years after I heard it.
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  #159  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:24 PM
Histrion Histrion is offline
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I was in college - I don't remember what year, or what class I was sitting in, or what - when suddenly I looked up and said, possibly aloud:

"Oh my God. 'Fargo North, Decoder!' "
__________________
Where am I going, and what am I doing in this handbasket?
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  #160  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:27 PM
KneadToKnow KneadToKnow is offline
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Originally Posted by jackdavinci View Post
Not something I realized but something I was told - in Young Frankenstein the reason a horse neighs everytime Frau Blucah's name is said is because Blucah means "glue" in German.
Don't believe everything you hear
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  #161  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:52 PM
RitterSport RitterSport is offline
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Took me 15 or 20 years to figure out that "My Aim is True" in Elvis Costello's Alison has a double meaning. (1. my intentions are pure, 2. I have good aim, so you can count on me to put out the big light. I always thought it was "my intentions are pure", but upon realizing the double meaning, I mentioned it to my dad who always thought it was the other one -- interesting different approaches to world, I guess)
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  #162  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:55 PM
Ellen Cherry Ellen Cherry is offline
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Originally Posted by Histrion View Post
I was in college - I don't remember what year, or what class I was sitting in, or what - when suddenly I looked up and said, possibly aloud:

"Oh my God. 'Fargo North, Decoder!' "
Um, what?
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  #163  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:56 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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Not sure if it's been mentioned in this thread yet, but there was recently an entire thread started by someone who just got the Britney Spears song, "If You Seek Amy."
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  #164  
Old 07-31-2009, 12:57 PM
Eyebrows 0f Doom Eyebrows 0f Doom is offline
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And Hagrid, Dumbledore, and Sirius all have "color" names. (Rubeus=red, Albus=white, Black=um, black.) It has something to do with alchemy, but don't ask me what.
"Sirius" is also the name of the Dog Star. Then of course there's Remus Lupin. (Remus as in Romulus &, and Lupin as in lupine.) That is one thing that really annoyed me about those books. All her names were way too obvious & cutesy like that. Plus Lupin wasn't born a werewolf, was he? He was attacked by one. Pretty lucky he already had that name then.
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  #165  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:00 PM
Eyebrows 0f Doom Eyebrows 0f Doom is offline
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Originally Posted by Siam Sam View Post
Not sure if it's been mentioned in this thread yet, but there was recently an entire thread started by someone who just got the Britney Spears song, "If You Seek Amy."
I never knew those were actually words!! I've only heard the song and thought she was just spelling out "F-u-c-k me."
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  #166  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:03 PM
MOIDALIZE MOIDALIZE is offline
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Um, what?
Just let this one go. Don't think about it, you'll just get pissed.
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  #167  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:10 PM
Hoopy Frood Hoopy Frood is offline
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Originally Posted by Eyebrows 0f Doom View Post
"Sirius" is also the name of the Dog Star. Then of course there's Remus Lupin. (Remus as in Romulus &, and Lupin as in lupine.) That is one thing that really annoyed me about those books. All her names were way too obvious & cutesy like that. Plus Lupin wasn't born a werewolf, was he? He was attacked by one. Pretty lucky he already had that name then.
I still think she spent too much time listening to the Musical of "The Secret Garden" in her past which is why she came up with the whole Lily's eyes thing. Every time I read a reference to Harry having Lily's green eyes the song "Lily's Eyes" would earworm it's way into my head. (Lily's eyes were apparently hazel in the musical.)

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Originally Posted by Morbo View Post
I've owned Subarus for years...and only recently found out that "Subaru" is Japanese for Pleiades, hence the logo.
I've owned a Subaru for almost 4 years now and never caught that reference. Thanks.

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Originally Posted by The New and Improved Superman View Post
Also in the Terminator movies, the man who is destined to save mankind from doom (whose father is a mystery to everyone) is John Conner, whose initials would be J.C. - kind of like another well-known savior with an ambiguous paternity...
This seems to be a fairly common trope. In the Deus Ex games, J.C. Denton is the intended savior of mankind.

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Originally Posted by Nobody View Post
That's what I always thought. So if it's them on the horses, what does their discussion at the beginning mean then?
The way I understand it is that these two are on a mission to upset the status quo and the castle is meant to be their first target.
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  #168  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:13 PM
Hoopy Frood Hoopy Frood is offline
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And I forgot to add my sudden realization.

I had seen Men In Black many times. I even own it, but it wasn't until my sixth or seventh viewing that I realized that K was the kid in the truck who took the wrong turn. And the flowers that he brought were for his girlfriend who he was going to propose to that night. I always thought K was one of the original MiB at that meeting.
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  #169  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:18 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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Thought of another one. In Texas, we had Aggie jokes. An Aggie is a student at Texas A&M University, a pretty darned good school, up there with the best in the country, but for some reason a culture of jokes has grown up with the basic theme of how dumb the students are. For most of them, you could probably substitute "Polish" for "Aggie," and it would work the same, regarding Polish jokes, which I think were common elsewhere back when I was younger.

This one joke went: "Did you hear about the Aggie who couldn't spell? He spent $25 to spend the night in a warehouse." I was just a kid and didn't get it. I even asked my father about it, and he pretended he didn't know. (I'm convinced he was pretending; he didn't like to talk about stuff like that.)
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  #170  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:18 PM
Histrion Histrion is offline
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Sorry, my bad... Reference to an American children's show of the 70s.

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Originally Posted by Ellen Cherry View Post
Um, what?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ele...ing_characters
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  #171  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:22 PM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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Originally Posted by JohnT View Post
The riddle that haunted, yes, haunted me for years was:

"If April showers bring May flowers, what do May flowers bring?"

Answer? Pilgrims!

I think I figured this one out about 10 years after I heard it.
What's a metaphor?

For cows, silly!
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  #172  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:25 PM
Histrion Histrion is offline
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Originally Posted by Zsofia View Post
What's a metaphor?

For cows, silly!
OK, that one took me a minute. I had to put my inner voice in a very Southern place.
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  #173  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:43 PM
Satchmo Satchmo is offline
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Originally Posted by Crawlspace View Post
- Almost everything in Wonka's office is split in half lengthwise. When he gets angry at Grandpa Joe, he starts reading him the contract, "The undersigned waives all rights and privileges here in contained et cetera et cetra." Looking closely, the contract is split in half length wise. The et cetera's are just place holders for the missing half.
I remember seeing that the first time in the theater and thinking, "Ah, Mr. Wonka's recently divorced."
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  #174  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:45 PM
Histrion Histrion is offline
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Originally Posted by palindromemordnilap View Post
2) For 10 years I worked at a building where one of the other cars had the vanity plate XANITAX, and I always wondered if it referred to a tax accountant, or pharmaceutical sales, or what? When I finally got it, I felt particularly stupid because

SPOILER:
My sister's name is Anita.
I don't think that's obvious at all. AFAIK, using X's as a graphical element to mark off the beginning and end of a word (or to separate words) has only become common in the past few years, and a license place wouldn't be the usual context for that.

Even if the X's represent "kisses," it still doesn't jump out at ya.
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  #175  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:53 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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OK, that one took me a minute. I had to put my inner voice in a very Southern place.
I had to google it.
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  #176  
Old 07-31-2009, 01:56 PM
Nobody Nobody is online now
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Originally Posted by Hoopy Frood View Post
The way I understand it is that these two are on a mission to upset the status quo and the castle is meant to be their first target.
Thank you for answering my question from three pages ago.

I'm Googling around to try and find the meaning of the song, and not only is it hard to find, but on SongMeanings.net there are a million different interpretations.


OK, I have another one, although, like some others around here, I had to be told about it. I was talking to my wife about reading the movie spoiler for the recent star trek movie and the conversation about how Dr. McCoy got his nick name of bones* and she thought it was stupid. When I said that they never gave an explanation of his nick name in the original series she said that doctors use to be called sawbones and she figured that bones was just a shortening of that. I had never heard the term sawbones before to refer to a doctor, which is why I never got his nickname.

*After a divorce he said the only thing he had left to his name were his bones
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  #177  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:10 PM
Eyebrows 0f Doom Eyebrows 0f Doom is offline
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Originally Posted by Hoopy Frood View Post
I still think she spent too much time listening to the Musical of "The Secret Garden" in her past which is why she came up with the whole Lily's eyes thing. Every time I read a reference to Harry having Lily's green eyes the song "Lily's Eyes" would earworm it's way into my head. (Lily's eyes were apparently hazel in the musical.)
Ha! Same here! Every time I would read that in the book I would picture Alan Rickman trying to sing that song.
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  #178  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:12 PM
SandyHook SandyHook is offline
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It wasn't until just a couple of years ago (I'm 62) while hearing The Who's "Momma's Got A Squeezebox," for the 10,000th time that the light came on for me. "Hey, this isn't about a real musical instrument at all."

Partial lyrics below for those as slow as myself, though there can't be many.



'Cause she's playing all night
And the music's all right
Mama's got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night

Well the kids don't eat
And the dog can't sleep
There's no escape from the music
In the whole damn street

'Cause she's playing all night
And the music's all right
Mama's got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night

She goes in and out and in and out and in and out and in and out
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  #179  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:16 PM
Eyebrows 0f Doom Eyebrows 0f Doom is offline
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What's a metaphor?

For cows, silly!
Please explain.
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  #180  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:34 PM
palindromemordnilap palindromemordnilap is offline
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Last Friday, my wife realized that the song Rapture, by Blondie, was called that because of the rap in the second half of the song.
Rap...sure.
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  #181  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:34 PM
RitterSport RitterSport is offline
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What's a meadow for?

On edit: That's for Eyebrows

Last edited by RitterSport; 07-31-2009 at 02:35 PM..
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  #182  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:47 PM
palindromemordnilap palindromemordnilap is offline
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Originally Posted by Eyebrows 0f Doom View Post
Please explain.
"Metaphor" sounds a little like "meadow for" so the spoken question sounds like "What's a meadow for?" Cows used to be kept in meadows, before [insert rant against modern agribusiness here].
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  #183  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:50 PM
Eyebrows 0f Doom Eyebrows 0f Doom is offline
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Originally Posted by RitterSport View Post
What's a meadow for?

On edit: That's for Eyebrows
Ahhh, thanks. I don't pronounce meadow like meta so that never occurred to me. I thought maybe a meta was some kind of milking tool.
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  #184  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:58 PM
ajdebosco ajdebosco is offline
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It's only a flesh wound......

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Originally Posted by Robot Arm View Post
I have seen the Dead Parrot Sketch more than a few times. At some point I noticed that when John Cleese is yelling at Polly to wake up, he opens the door of the cage! I mean, a birdcage isn't exactly soundproof with the door closed, is it? But he hold it right up to his mouth and opens the door, all the better to rouse him from dreams of the fjords. There's something about that action that fits perfectly with the over-exacting nature of the character.

I tend to think that the Pythons greatest gifts were in their writing, but that's one case where the detail of the performance really sells it.

That is dead solid perfect, R A. I recently saw the interview of John Cleese on Inside the Actor's Studio where the discussion rolled around to the question of just what is funny. He maintained that it is comical to see someone going increasingly berserk, but what is really humorous is the reactions of the other characters observing the meltdown.

I had to re-review the dead parrot sketch after reading your post, and my cold beverage came out my nose until I was forced to set it down before wasting more of it. My sides still ache from seeing him try to explain "...was no more....he has ceased to be... he has expired... gone to meet his maker...he's an EX-PARROT!"
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  #185  
Old 07-31-2009, 03:02 PM
Baby Driver Baby Driver is offline
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I mentioned this in another thread before, but I don't know how many years I heard the song Life in the Fast Lane before I realized that "there were lines on the mirror" was referring to cocaine.
There were a couple.

Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody":

"Mama, just killed a man
Put a gun against his head
Pulled my trigger now he's dead"

For a long while I didn't get that there was a comma after mama. I always visualized the singer's mama being some hard-knock woman busting into a trailer with a revolver.


Simon and Garfunkel's "The Boxer":
"But I got no offers
Just a come on from the whores on 7th avenue
I do declare, there were times when I was so lonesome
I took some comfort there"

I was about eleven when I first heard the song and I thought "whores" was "horse". I pictured this young man sleeping in the stables among the horses
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  #186  
Old 07-31-2009, 03:03 PM
bup bup is offline
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But it took me several rereads of the first Harry Potter book to realize that Diagon Alley was a play on diagonally.
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  #187  
Old 07-31-2009, 03:07 PM
Nobody Nobody is online now
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Originally Posted by Baby Driver View Post
Simon and Garfunkel's "The Boxer":
"But I got no offers
Just a come on from the whores on 7th avenue
I do declare, there were times when I was so lonesome
I took some comfort there"

I was about eleven when I first heard the song and I thought "whores" was "horse". I pictured this young man sleeping in the stables among the horses
Wow, my hearing must be screwed up.
I could never make out the lyrics between "But I got no offers," and "on 7th avenue," and actually, I thought they were saying something about 5th avenue.

So now that part make sense. Thanks.
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  #188  
Old 07-31-2009, 03:12 PM
ajdebosco ajdebosco is offline
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Oh yeah, I also remember seeing a blurb about the 4th century Greek jokebook (Philogelos: the laugh addict) that contained a variation of the sketch, but it was a slave rather than a Norwegian parrot.
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  #189  
Old 07-31-2009, 03:28 PM
ajdebosco ajdebosco is offline
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Great thread, and I'm a little off on this but ..

a couple of say aloud pranks that some people haven't heard:

I am sofa king
we Todd Head

and a pink phone message note

7/31/09 4:25 p.m.

(312) 555-1624

please return call

Oliver Klozehoff
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  #190  
Old 07-31-2009, 05:33 PM
Malleus, Incus, Stapes! Malleus, Incus, Stapes! is offline
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I tend to miss basic plot elements until the tenth reading or so, never mind hidden meanings and such.

F'r instance, Terry Pratchett's Small Gods. I'm reading it for aproximately the one billionth time, and it occurs to me that deserts are a reoccuring theme here. There's the deserts that prophets are associated with, the deserts around the citadel, the desert in the afterlife, the desert that Vorbis sneaks his troops across, the desert that Brutha crosses with Om and Vorbis... No, this hadn't occured to me before.

Thinking some more on Pratchett's oeuvre, I realized that Thief Of Time was a meditation on the meaning of humanity, along with its cons and pros. You know, because just about every character short of Jason struggles with that very issue over the course of the book?

And The Last Continent, in addition to being about Asutralia, is about sex. Not just the bit with the God of Evolution- the whole UU wizards subplot is about Mrs. Whitlow, and the effect she has on them.

Some day I will discover some other stunningly obvious theme while rereading my Discworld collection, and I will be sure give myself a .
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  #191  
Old 07-31-2009, 05:35 PM
eleanorigby eleanorigby is offline
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Originally Posted by Nom_de_Plume View Post
I guess I was pretty young when Cheap Trick first came out with Surrender. I remember hearing the line "Just the other day I heard of a Soldier's falling off.." and wondering what the Soldier fell off of.
Then recently I heard the song on Jack FM and "Of course, THAT'S what fell off!"
WHAT fell off? Augh--this thread is frustrating.
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  #192  
Old 07-31-2009, 06:30 PM
Chronos Chronos is online now
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Quote:
Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody":

"Mama, just killed a man
Put a gun against his head
Pulled my trigger now he's dead"

For a long while I didn't get that there was a comma after mama. I always visualized the singer's mama being some hard-knock woman busting into a trailer with a revolver.
I always hear a very unaccented "I" before "killed a man". So it's "Mama, I killed a man". It might be a dialectical difference that I heard it and you didn't.
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  #193  
Old 07-31-2009, 07:14 PM
Lakai Lakai is offline
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This is from watching the final episode of season five of Buffy the Vampire Slayer:

SPOILER:
She sacrifices herself to save her sister. She falls into the vortex thingy with her arms spread out wide. And then she gets resurrected in season six.


It took a while before I made the connection.
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  #194  
Old 07-31-2009, 07:40 PM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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Originally Posted by Histrion View Post
OK, that one took me a minute. I had to put my inner voice in a very Southern place.
The funny thing is, it's my ex-teacher mother from Pittsburgh who loves that one and told it to me a lot as a child, not my Georgia born dad.
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  #195  
Old 07-31-2009, 07:42 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baby Driver View Post
Simon and Garfunkel's "The Boxer":
"But I got no offers
Just a come on from the whores on 7th avenue
I do declare, there were times when I was so lonesome
I took some comfort there"

I was about eleven when I first heard the song and I thought "whores" was "horse". I pictured this young man sleeping in the stables among the horses
What, you mean like this guy?
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  #196  
Old 07-31-2009, 08:15 PM
Linty Fresh Linty Fresh is offline
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I've got two.

The first is from The Usual Suspects. I used to complain that the Kobayashi character made no sense. He had a European face, a Japanese name and a Pakistani accent. Finally, someone explained to me that:

SPOILER:
In all likelihood, Kobayashi either never existed or was completely different from how he was portrayed in the movie. Remember that what we were seeing was merely Kint/Soze's bullshit story. Oh, we saw someone at the end who looked like Kobayashi, but how could we know who he really was. He could have been just another driver.


Another one was from Dodgeball. In a Vegas motel, Patches O'Houlihan tells Peter LaFleur that he has a couple of call girls in his hotel room, if LaFleur cared to join him. When LaFleur turns down the offer, Patches goes "Suit yourself, queer!" and wheels away. It took me a few times watching the movie before I realized that there probably weren't any prostitutes in Patches's room, and LaFleur was right not to join him.
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  #197  
Old 07-31-2009, 08:16 PM
Idlewild Idlewild is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2001
Quote:
Originally Posted by SandyHook View Post
It wasn't until just a couple of years ago (I'm 62) while hearing The Who's "Momma's Got A Squeezebox," for the 10,000th time that the light came on for me. "Hey, this isn't about a real musical instrument at all."

Partial lyrics below for those as slow as myself, though there can't be many.



'Cause she's playing all night
And the music's all right
Mama's got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night

Well the kids don't eat
And the dog can't sleep
There's no escape from the music
In the whole damn street

'Cause she's playing all night
And the music's all right
Mama's got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night

She goes in and out and in and out and in and out and in and out
Is it just me, or does that sound filthy?!
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  #198  
Old 07-31-2009, 08:23 PM
Linty Fresh Linty Fresh is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2003
Thought of another one.

In the opening sequence to Watchmen, we see a bunch of stylized scenes establishing the heroes' characters. Among them is a scene of a bomber with Sally Jupiter's portrait on the side. It was our third time watching that scene before my wife realized that the bomber was returning from dropping the A-bomb on Japan.
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  #199  
Old 07-31-2009, 08:58 PM
SciFiSam SciFiSam is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2003
It was only after I noticed the lack of eyebrows in the Girl With a Pearl Earring that I realised that was the source of her ambiguous expression (eyebrows show a surprising amount of expression), and then noticed exactly the same on the notorious Mona Lisa.
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  #200  
Old 07-31-2009, 09:18 PM
SciFiSam SciFiSam is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by commasense View Post
Is there any reason to think this is anything other than a coincidence? Did Beckett speak or understand Mandarin?

In any case, it's not exactly obvious, as the OP asked.
He was briefly a modern languages scholar, and he wrote in French because he wanted to be forced to be more succinct. Odds are he thought about his character names extremely carefully, and would have either chosen those nicknames because of what they meant, or would at least have become aware of the meanings shortly after they were chosen.

Of course, they're also a pun on 'did he go.'
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