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  #201  
Old 03-06-2010, 06:33 PM
Le Ministre de l'au-delà Le Ministre de l'au-delà is offline
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So how fussed do y'all get about the appearance of your instrument? I'm curious because my good classical is just over 8 years old, has never sounded better but is starting to become really scratched up. (Western Red Cedar is one of the softest tone woods I know, and it's just frightening how easy it is to put a scratch on it with your fingernail.) It came by every one of those marks honestly; it shows how much this instrument gets played and I'd much rather have a guitar that I want to play all the time versus some poor thing locked in a glass case.

So how much do you freak out about marks on your axe?
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  #202  
Old 03-06-2010, 06:59 PM
Enginerd Enginerd is offline
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The first one breaks my heart, but I feel it a little less with each new one. As long as they're "honest scratches," as you say, I can live with them.
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  #203  
Old 03-06-2010, 07:31 PM
E-Sabbath E-Sabbath is offline
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Any thoughts on how to buff out some of those scratches?
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  #204  
Old 03-07-2010, 01:51 AM
squeegee squeegee is online now
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In the save vein, I'm also curious how folks maintain newer instrument finishes. I have two newer (two years) solid body guitars that I use regularly, and when I change strings I wipe down the necks and spray 409 or Windex onto a soft rag and get rid of all the finger-smudgies on the body. I also keep around a can of compressed air and blow the dust off dusty places like the bridge and the headstock even when it's not time to to change strings. I also have a cheap semi-hollow (epi dot) with a satin finish, but it's three weeks old so I haven't yet thought about how to clean it.

What's your regimen?
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  #205  
Old 03-07-2010, 06:36 AM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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I wipe them down with a soft cloth after playing. I get them checked out by a tech once or twice a year. Beyond that - not much. My guitars get gunky and beat - I don't abuse them, but I don't worry about "good, honest" wear as Enginerd said.

Le Ministre - you should see the cover of the last Fretboard Journal - it has a close up of a Martin that who's top has almost been played through, like Willie Nelson's guitar Trigger.

Right when I finished my Tele Special homebrew electric, I dropped my heavy brass slide on it and hit the butt of the guitar against my amp during a gig. Sigh - a couple of nice, obvious dings front and back. What can you do? I made it to play it...

Last edited by WordMan; 03-07-2010 at 06:36 AM..
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  #206  
Old 03-08-2010, 01:09 PM
BigShooter BigShooter is offline
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When building a guitar, I border on OCD with my sanding technique. I just have to get out every single sanding scratch. Same goes for buffing and polishing. Dings and scratches at that point are imperfections.

But when the guitar is finished and I begin to actually play it, I treat it like a two-bit whore. Dings and scratches at that point are signs of character.

I've spent weeks on the perfect finish only to ding it up in the first week of playing it and it doesn't really bother me. Weird, eh?
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  #207  
Old 03-08-2010, 01:31 PM
ethelbert ethelbert is offline
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I had a Martin D-18, bought when I was 16 & used for over 35 years. It was a disaster. It had more dimples than a golf ball, several cracks in the side and the finish was a mess where it had come into contact with a vinyl covered stand. Never bothered me a bit. I am a bit more protective of my Lowden, but not much. I hope it survives its occasional encounters with my nephew.
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  #208  
Old 03-08-2010, 04:02 PM
BubbaDog BubbaDog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WordMan View Post
mwa...mwa...MWA-HAH-HAH-HAH-HAH-HAH!!!!



(that was my attempt at demonic laughter now that my dastardly scheme has been revealed...)

Yep - G.A.S. ain't pretty. BubbaDog - I played a pre-war Martin dreadnaught a few weeks ago which was selling for as much as a decent car and it was amazing...everything they are legendarily supposed to be (they are held up as the acoustic equivalent of a 1959 sunburst Gibson Les Paul). And damn if I have not been looking for angles to go after that guitar, some of which I might be actually able to work out (yeah right)...if it weren't for those meddling kids! (cue Scooby Doo theme)...

ETA: 6 guitars?! 2 amps?! I am so proud of you! What all have you scored??
I thought about listing my stuff but then thought that might work best as a separate subject.

So I started this thread.
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  #209  
Old 03-08-2010, 04:50 PM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Originally Posted by BubbaDog View Post
I thought about listing my stuff but then thought that might work best as a separate subject.

So I started this thread.
Cool - I look forward to jumping into that thread on a day when I don't have back-to-back-to-back meetings...
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  #210  
Old 03-08-2010, 07:09 PM
SteveG1 SteveG1 is offline
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Originally Posted by Clothahump View Post
I had to stop playing 12 string when I came down with arthritis. 6 string at times was almost impossible. But new advances in RA medications have enabled me to play again, and SWMBO surprised me with a 12 string for Christmas.

I'm relearning how to play 12, and rediscovering what a challenge it is and how much fun it is.
Here's hoping you can keep at it. As for the 12, don't give up hope. Some do have a ligher action than others. I had (until it was stolen) one of the first Japanese Aria 12s, and it was very playable. Just keep an eye out.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigShooter View Post
Place your finger lightly over the string right at the 12th fret. As you pick the string, move your finger away from the string. If done correctly, you should hear a chimey tone that is the same note as the open string. Basically, what you're doing is cutting the scale length of the string in half by placing your finger at the 12th fret. Then by plucking the string and and removing your finger, your dampening some of the harmonic overtones of the open string.
A jazz player showed me a "trick" that hadn't occured to me until then, that goes along with this...
Play a melody, while simultaneously picking the string and using a free finger to "hit" that note's harmonic. It's a different effect, and can be interesting if not overdone.
Quote:
Originally Posted by squeegee View Post
Here's the poll section of the thread:

How many guitars* do you own?

Me: 5, all electrics. Tele, SG, Schecter C1, Epi Dot, and a "super-strat" knockoff.


*using your definition of guitar
I'm down to one, my LP Custom. I figure, that's all I need.
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Originally Posted by Clothahump View Post
I have a Takamine 6-string and a Takamine 12-string. I've taken both to a local (well, kinda local. They're about 20 miles from my house) luthier and have been highly impressed by the results and the quality of work done. Both times, the cost for the setup was around 50 clams.

Shameless plug for them. If you live in the Houston area, they are great: http://www.thetexasguitarcompany.com/index.html.
Takamine? I friggin' LOVE those things! And fine business on getting another 12 too
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  #211  
Old 03-10-2010, 12:11 PM
E-Sabbath E-Sabbath is offline
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Phungi is trying to teach guitar to a 9 year old.
Anyone want to help?
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  #212  
Old 03-14-2010, 03:11 PM
E-Sabbath E-Sabbath is offline
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Another request for some info for a newbie, on guitars and learning. Specifically, 'strat or gibson'.
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  #213  
Old 03-15-2010, 03:25 PM
BigShooter BigShooter is offline
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OK - all this talk of gear has given me a GAS attack and as a result, I've started building a new Tele - actually an Esquire. For those of you that don't know, an Esquire is a Tele without the neck pickup and some special wiring that gives some interesting sound choices from the remaining bridge pickup.

I have a two-piece walnut body blank lying around the shop doing nothing that is now destined to become a very special Esquire. I'll get some of the parts by taking apart the last Tele I built for myself that just isn't doing it for me anymore:

http://www.ghosttownguitars.com/Ghos.../Photos.html#5

I always liked the feel of the neck on this one - it's just that the sound I got out of it wasn't what I thought it would be. And while the finish came out pretty good, there were some asthetic things about the body that didn't come out the way I had hoped - the mahogany strip running down the middle being the biggest culprit.

So my question is would this build be something you all would be interested in following? If so, I'll start up a separate build thread. If not, then you guys aren't nearly at the level of guitar geekery that Wordman and I are.

Last edited by BigShooter; 03-15-2010 at 03:26 PM..
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  #214  
Old 03-15-2010, 03:59 PM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
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I probably won't understand 80% of it, but I'd be eager to see it, from the standpoint of learning more about guitars.
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  #215  
Old 03-15-2010, 06:57 PM
E-Sabbath E-Sabbath is offline
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Oh hell yeah, Big. I'll learn somethin.

If you don't mind, I'm really strongly considering swapping out the machine heads on my cheap Strat. What would you suggest I look for in replacing them?
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  #216  
Old 03-15-2010, 08:23 PM
BigShooter BigShooter is offline
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Ok. Maybe I'll start one tomorrow.

As far as your tuning keys are concerned - you have to be careful to get tuners that are going to fit the holes that you have drilled in your headstock. Here are the usual suspects and sizes:

Fender Vintage - 11/32"
Schallers - 11/32" - 25/64"
Gotoh/Grovers - 11/32" - 13/32"
Sperzels - 25/64"
Planet Waves 13/32"

When you take the tuners off measure the diameter of the hole preferably using an accurate caliper, but if you don't have one, just get a ruler that has 64's of an inch marked off. Once you have the size, then you can narrow down the choices to one or two of the above makers. They all make a quality product and will serve you well.

That being said, there some issues to consider. Even though you measure your holes and get something that is supposed to work, more often than not, the tuner grommets won't fit easily. Sometimes they're off by a hair. If that's the case, get a piece of dowel material that's a little smaller diameter than your hole and wrap some 120 grit sandpaper around it. Stick that through the hole and use it to remove that hair of wood that's in the way. Keep in mind that the grommets should be able to be pushed into place and fit snuggly. No glue of any kind should be used.

I would not suggest buying a bigger diameter tuner in hopes of drilling your holes bigger to make it fit. If you don't have a drill press, this could end in disaster very easily. So just stick to the ones that are the right size.

Do you use the tremolo bar much? If so you might want to get a set of locking tuners to prevent string slippage and tuning issues. You can also get "staggered" tuners which have posts that get progressively shorter from low E to high E strings. These reduce the need for string trees which cause tuning issues through friction when using the whammy bar. You can also get staggered locking tuners!!

Also, Sperzels are notoriously hard to install nice and straight. If you end up getting some of those, best to have a pro do it for you to get it right.

Last edited by BigShooter; 03-15-2010 at 08:25 PM..
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  #217  
Old 03-16-2010, 05:24 AM
E-Sabbath E-Sabbath is offline
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Heh. Oh, I have a drill press. In theory, I could prrrrrobably build an entire guitar from spare tree bits. I've got _everything_. Table saw, bandsaw, router, you name it. But no, I don't use the whammy. Thanks for the advice.
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  #218  
Old 03-16-2010, 08:29 AM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Originally Posted by E-Sabbath View Post
Heh. Oh, I have a drill press. In theory, I could prrrrrobably build an entire guitar from spare tree bits. I've got _everything_. Table saw, bandsaw, router, you name it. But no, I don't use the whammy. Thanks for the advice.
I am just back in the office and have a ton of backlogged work I need to get through - but BigShooter: hell yes, I would love to follow your work. And E-Sabbath, BigShooter is giving you great advice on the tuners. Straight drop-in's are easy, if all you need to do is clean out the hole a bit, you're solid, but if anything cute is required, I would stop. Even if you know wood well, unless you are prepared to trash the neck - which can happen easily if you aren't careful - then don't do a lot of work on the wood. Having said that, it is very easy to get the right-sized replacements so it should be no big deal.

As for my preferences, you know, I love locking tuners like BS mentions, and if I have any tuning concerns like a guitar with a whammy, would recommend them. However, if the guitar has no real tuning challenges, I tend to go old school with "slotted shaft" tuners - the shaft that the strings wrap around have a slot in them and a hole in the very center; to re-string, you cut the string to a bit longer than the tuner, stick the string down into the hole and then bend it into the slot to start wrapping it around the shaft (I did a quick search to find pics but didn't have luck and don't have time). I like these because the lock into the tuner solidly (no string slippage at all) and don't leave an open string end to fray and look sloppy. Super easy to use...they were stock on Fenders for a long time...
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  #219  
Old 03-16-2010, 09:17 AM
Shark Shark is offline
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If anyone is interested in a step-by-step, very well documented recreation of a 1959 Les Paul Burst, then look here on the TDPRI, a telecaster forum. This is just one of a number of meticulous builds that Gil Yaron, a luthier in Israel has documented. Mostly he documents his telecaster builds, but he had a real '59 Burst in his hands and was able to take measurements. Based on his previous builds, the telecaster faithful were clamoring for him to do this Les Paul build on a telecaster forum.

This one is in-progress and includes such attention to detail as casting his own pickup rings because he didn't think what was available was accurate enough. It is fascinating to see this come together, and he is very good at explaining why he is doing something the way he is. If you like this one, look for his recreations of early telecasters, strats and p-basses too.

Just don't blame me if you get hooked.
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  #220  
Old 03-16-2010, 09:23 AM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Originally Posted by Shark View Post
If anyone is interested in a step-by-step, very well documented recreation of a 1959 Les Paul Burst, then look here on the TDPRI, a telecaster forum. This is just one of a number of meticulous builds that Gil Yaron, a luthier in Israel has documented. Mostly he documents his telecaster builds, but he had a real '59 Burst in his hands and was able to take measurements. Based on his previous builds, the telecaster faithful were clamoring for him to do this Les Paul build on a telecaster forum.

This one is in-progress and includes such attention to detail as casting his own pickup rings because he didn't think what was available was accurate enough. It is fascinating to see this come together, and he is very good at explaining why he is doing something the way he is. If you like this one, look for his recreations of early telecasters, strats and p-basses too.

Just don't blame me if you get hooked.
What about the fact that I have been traveling on business for a few days and have a ton of emails and work to catch up on *don't* you understand?!?!

I hate you - I now have to read that.
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  #221  
Old 03-16-2010, 12:29 PM
BigShooter BigShooter is offline
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Originally Posted by Shark View Post
If anyone is interested in a step-by-step, very well documented recreation of a 1959 Les Paul Burst, then look here on the TDPRI, a telecaster forum. This is just one of a number of meticulous builds that Gil Yaron, a luthier in Israel has documented. Mostly he documents his telecaster builds, but he had a real '59 Burst in his hands and was able to take measurements. Based on his previous builds, the telecaster faithful were clamoring for him to do this Les Paul build on a telecaster forum.

This one is in-progress and includes such attention to detail as casting his own pickup rings because he didn't think what was available was accurate enough. It is fascinating to see this come together, and he is very good at explaining why he is doing something the way he is. If you like this one, look for his recreations of early telecasters, strats and p-basses too.

Just don't blame me if you get hooked.
Well, shit - kind of steals my thunder, don't it. I actually started reading that post when it first started and I've read some of his other ones. That guy does really nice work...

Since the Shark has upped the ante - - and since I'm already a little ways into the Esquire project, I think I'll start a thread on another guitar I'm working on. It's going to be a body shape of my own design made out of chambered alder and a quilted maple top dyed blue. I haven't started this one yet, so you guys can see it from the beginning...
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  #222  
Old 03-16-2010, 12:59 PM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Originally Posted by Shark View Post
If anyone is interested in a step-by-step, very well documented recreation of a 1959 Les Paul Burst, then look here on the TDPRI, a telecaster forum. .
Have I mentioned I hate you I have a big document to review and I am stuck in that darn thread.

- He trashed a real PAF pickup in order to get the design specs right? That's a $3,000 - $5,000 pickup right there...
- He claims that the "secret" (such as there actually is one) of a PAF pickup is the wire and the windings? I bet he is correct about that being a critical factor, but none of the other stuff?
- He asserts that 50's Les Pauls had to be made with African Mahogany, i.e., Limba wood, aka "Korina" not Honduran mahogany? If that is in any way true, that would be like saying the reason you love old Mustangs is because they really have Chevy engines. Seriously, in geek circles that is a recipe for flame wars I can't even begin to imagine the scope of...

Oy. Back to work. I hate you (seriously - fascinating stuff - thanks).

And BigShooter - sounds fascinating.

Last edited by WordMan; 03-16-2010 at 01:00 PM..
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  #223  
Old 03-16-2010, 01:16 PM
Shark Shark is offline
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Originally Posted by WordMan View Post
What about the fact that I have been traveling on business for a few days and have a ton of emails and work to catch up on *don't* you understand?!?!

I hate you - I now have to read that.
You know WordMan, you have room to talk. I wouldn't even know of the world of guitar forums and build threads if you hadn't started the ball rolling with your build threads here. Karma's a bitch ain't it.

BigShooter,
I'd love to see the build thread on the chambered guitar. Is it going to be more like a thinline or an archtop? What about the Esquire, are you going for an old school blackguard, or something a little more colorful?
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  #224  
Old 03-16-2010, 01:18 PM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Originally Posted by Shark View Post
You know WordMan, you have room to talk. I wouldn't even know of the world of guitar forums and build threads if you hadn't started the ball rolling with your build threads here. Karma's a bitch ain't it.
Touche my friend!!
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  #225  
Old 03-16-2010, 01:25 PM
Shark Shark is offline
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Originally Posted by WordMan View Post
Have I mentioned I hate you I have a big document to review and I am stuck in that darn thread.

- He trashed a real PAF pickup in order to get the design specs right? That's a $3,000 - $5,000 pickup right there...
- He claims that the "secret" (such as there actually is one) of a PAF pickup is the wire and the windings? I bet he is correct about that being a critical factor, but none of the other stuff?
- He asserts that 50's Les Pauls had to be made with African Mahogany, i.e., Limba wood, aka "Korina" not Honduran mahogany? If that is in any way true, that would be like saying the reason you love old Mustangs is because they really have Chevy engines. Seriously, in geek circles that is a recipe for flame wars I can't even begin to imagine the scope of...

Oy. Back to work. I hate you (seriously - fascinating stuff - thanks).

And BigShooter - sounds fascinating.
I won't spoil it for you, but suffice it to say that he geeks on every little detail. Wire and windings are just a part of it. He is of the notion that every little thing, now matter how small, contributes to the whole of the tone. No shortcuts in his world.
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  #226  
Old 03-16-2010, 02:43 PM
BigShooter BigShooter is offline
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Originally Posted by Shark View Post
You know WordMan, you have room to talk. I wouldn't even know of the world of guitar forums and build threads if you hadn't started the ball rolling with your build threads here. Karma's a bitch ain't it.

BigShooter,
I'd love to see the build thread on the chambered guitar. Is it going to be more like a thinline or an archtop? What about the Esquire, are you going for an old school blackguard, or something a little more colorful?
I'm thinking flame painted red brass or copper, like I've been doing with my other guitars. Probably in more of a Tele Jr. shape than your standard tele pickguard...

For the chambered one, it'll be more of a thinline. Archtops are a little out of my league at the moment. This fall I'm hoping to take an eight week class on building an archtop that's offered by a luthier here in town.
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  #227  
Old 03-16-2010, 04:43 PM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Originally Posted by Shark View Post
If anyone is interested in a step-by-step, very well documented recreation of a 1959 Les Paul Burst, then look here on the TDPRI, a telecaster forum. This is just one of a number of meticulous builds that Gil Yaron, a luthier in Israel has documented. .
Just dipping in here to say that I got through about 20 pages of that currently-41-page thread.

That is the BEST FREAKIN', GEEKIN' GUITAR THREAD EVER.

Hands down - no contest. I am so not worthy of the geek title in relation to that thread it is not even funny. Not only do you get a step-by-step, photo-by-photo breakdown of building a truly hand-made, luthier-built guitar like a Les Paul (vs. a parts-o-caster - granted, BigShooter actually makes his parts vs. me who just buys and assembles, so his stuff counts a lot more than mine in terms of "craft") - but the thread is chock full of 1950's Gibson general / Les Paul specific geekery about how the guitars are made, magnetic properties of pickups, types of wood used with Latin species name squabbling...

I have actually fainted while typing this from all the geekery - but that thread is so powerful good that it is keeping my hands moving...

Shark - I owe you one, buddy; thanks.
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  #228  
Old 03-16-2010, 06:30 PM
BigShooter BigShooter is offline
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Just dipping in here to say that I got through about 20 pages of that currently-41-page thread.

That is the BEST FREAKIN', GEEKIN' GUITAR THREAD EVER.

Hands down - no contest. I am so not worthy of the geek title in relation to that thread it is not even funny. Not only do you get a step-by-step, photo-by-photo breakdown of building a truly hand-made, luthier-built guitar like a Les Paul (vs. a parts-o-caster - granted, BigShooter actually makes his parts vs. me who just buys and assembles, so his stuff counts a lot more than mine in terms of "craft").
Bolding mine...

Wordman I know you don't mean to insinuate that my guitar making skills are subpar*, so I'm not pissed or anything, but this does bring up an interesting question:

Why, in your eyes, do you think a Les Paul is anymore of a "hand-made, luthier-built guitar" than a Caster of some sort?

*However, I'll freely admit that the guy in that thread is a little ahead of me in the skill department. I'll get there though
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  #229  
Old 03-16-2010, 07:43 PM
SteveG1 SteveG1 is offline
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You guys are getting me interested in playing again (it's been a while). I sort of drifted away when I moved to L.A. It seemed everyone I ran into wanted to have someone else's sound, and sometimes even someone else's look, and I'm just not into that. Me, I just wanted to knock around, have fun and if we sounded like crap, so what.
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  #230  
Old 03-17-2010, 06:11 AM
DragonAsh DragonAsh is offline
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So since this thread has also gotten my guitar juices flowin', anyone here in the UK want to put together a crappy-but-enthusiastic cover band for getting together and making occasionally-not-awful music?
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  #231  
Old 03-17-2010, 07:54 AM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Originally Posted by BigShooter View Post
Bolding mine...

Wordman I know you don't mean to insinuate that my guitar making skills are subpar*, so I'm not pissed or anything, but this does bring up an interesting question:

Why, in your eyes, do you think a Les Paul is anymore of a "hand-made, luthier-built guitar" than a Caster of some sort?

*However, I'll freely admit that the guy in that thread is a little ahead of me in the skill department. I'll get there though
Stuck in an all-morning Forecast meeting. I'll get back here this afternoon.
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  #232  
Old 03-17-2010, 07:55 AM
Shark Shark is offline
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That is the BEST FREAKIN', GEEKIN' GUITAR THREAD EVER.
Glad to be able to contribute something. So do you or do you not want me to point you to some of his other build threads?

I'll just give you one more, that shows the lengths he goes to to select components for a specific sound and weight for a jazz bass. I'll leave it to you find others if you want. I don't want to be responsible for you getting fired.
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  #233  
Old 03-17-2010, 12:30 PM
Craneop2 Craneop2 is offline
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Not to hijack this thread, But I reckon I need a lil critique here.

A freind gave me an old acoustic guitar a few years back and I plunked around on it for a long time. He gave me a few lessons and I worked at it diligently for a few years. Learned all the basic open chords and maybe a little more, nothing special at all.

My sister came by right before my birthday last month aand asked why I never play any more and I told her quite frankly that the guitar HURT to play. I never had the action or anything checked and it hurt like the dickens to finger the frets!

She had her husband take me to town and told him to buy me a guitar.. My choice.$150.00 limit. Found a Yamaha SE 200 in a pawn shop and whittled the guy to $90.00.

It plays like a dream compared to the old accoustic and sounds OK with an old squire 15 amp I bought YEARS ago.

Did I get a good deal? Is it an OK guitar for an old guy just picking up the guitar again?

You guys are the reason I caught the fever again.. My wife thanks you! Gets me outta her hair for a few hours every day!

BTW Most of your conversations on this subject are greek to me! I figure maybe by pure osmosis I can pick up some knowlege.
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  #234  
Old 03-17-2010, 12:37 PM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Originally Posted by Craneop2 View Post
Not to hijack this thread, But I reckon I need a lil critique here.

A freind gave me an old acoustic guitar a few years back and I plunked around on it for a long time. He gave me a few lessons and I worked at it diligently for a few years. Learned all the basic open chords and maybe a little more, nothing special at all.

My sister came by right before my birthday last month aand asked why I never play any more and I told her quite frankly that the guitar HURT to play. I never had the action or anything checked and it hurt like the dickens to finger the frets!

She had her husband take me to town and told him to buy me a guitar.. My choice.$150.00 limit. Found a Yamaha SE 200 in a pawn shop and whittled the guy to $90.00.

It plays like a dream compared to the old accoustic and sounds OK with an old squire 15 amp I bought YEARS ago.

Did I get a good deal? Is it an OK guitar for an old guy just picking up the guitar again?

You guys are the reason I caught the fever again.. My wife thanks you! Gets me outta her hair for a few hours every day!

BTW Most of your conversations on this subject are greek to me! I figure maybe by pure osmosis I can pick up some knowlege.
Like this guitar? (link to some sort of online classified with a pic)

If so - then heck yeah, you did great! As a rule Yamaha's are well-made guitars and an electric can be much easier to play vs. a poorly set-up acoustic. Good on ya.

Glad to hear you are enjoying the geekery - as for the Greek, feel free to ask for explanations - we geeky types can then squabble over the details.
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  #235  
Old 03-17-2010, 12:58 PM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Originally Posted by BigShooter View Post
Bolding mine...

Wordman I know you don't mean to insinuate that my guitar making skills are subpar, so I'm not pissed or anything
Absolutely not, sir - your stuff looks really cool.

Quote:
Why, in your eyes, do you think a Les Paul is anymore of a "hand-made, luthier-built guitar" than a Caster of some sort?
Okay - I am between meetings on a heavy day, but want to log in a few thoughts:

- When viewed as a tool for a guitarist, set-necks and bolt-ons are simply different design / build groups - one is not better than the other.

- When it comes to the equivalent steps that both guitars share - e.g., shaping the back of or fretting a neck; finishing the guitar; selecting and setting up the electronics and giving the overall guitar a final playability set-up - the two types are equivalent.

- Bolt-ons are easier to assemble.
> I can, and have, bolted a new neck onto a new body and checked it for true, shimmed it where necessary to get a better neck angle, etc. I can't, and won't, carve out a dove-tail joint and set a neck into a body and glued it. Even if I got the parts pre-carved and ready-to-glue I am sure I would blow the clamping or something.
> I can't carve an arch top onto a body like a Les Paul has. Non-issue on most Bolt-ons. In fact, when Gibson decided to go with the Les Paul in '52, finally goaded into solid-body land because of the success of the Broad (renamed Tele) caster, they specifically went with a carved top so the guitar looked more craft-made vs. the "you can make it with a bandsaw" construction of a Fender...

So I guess I am in the Groucho Marx camp - I have a deeper appreciation for stuff I can't do. Again, I can't actually make a bolt-on body - I bought mine pre-carved on line - nor did I finish it myself, which is why I tip my hat to you...

Whaddya think?

Last edited by WordMan; 03-17-2010 at 01:01 PM..
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  #236  
Old 03-17-2010, 01:19 PM
BubbaDog BubbaDog is offline
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I just gotta bring this up here.

I went to a show called Experience Hendrix last night which had a ton of great guitar gods playing some classical Hendrix tunes.

But what really made it special was that through some very far fetched coincidences my two friends and I got to spend about an hour on Eric Johnson's tour bus talking with him about, well, guitars and guitarists.

Eric's a very down to earth friendly guy and just listening to him give his perspective on touring and other musicians was a once in a lifetime treat.

review here
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  #237  
Old 03-17-2010, 01:21 PM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Originally Posted by BubbaDog View Post
I just gotta bring this up here.

I went to a show called Experience Hendrix last night which had a ton of great guitar gods playing some classical Hendrix tunes.

But what really made it special was that through some very far fetched coincidences my two friends and I got to spend about an hour on Eric Johnson's tour bus talking with him about, well, guitars and guitarists.

Eric's a very down to earth friendly guy and just listening to him give his perspective on touring and other musicians was a once in a lifetime treat.

review here
Wow - cool. I am going on March 24th in NJ, I believe.

What did you discuss with Eric? I stood next to him at a booth at the annual Arlington Vintage Guitar Show last year, but we didn't exchange more than a hello - he was too focused on a '54 Les Paul goldtop...drool...
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  #238  
Old 03-17-2010, 01:25 PM
Craneop2 Craneop2 is offline
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Actually WordMan, that exactly the same guitar.(Not the same ONE but one exactly like it. Even down to the color!)

It seems to have the equipped pickups and tuning machines. I am able to play more frequently and longer stretches of time than the old accoustic. Quite enjoyable! The old accoustic will be sent to shop for refurbishment possibly but for now will reside in it stand just watching and weeping.

Now I am thinking maybe some commercial lessons just to make myself grow a bit.

Thank to you guys I now have the gumption to take it all up again. I KNOW I'll never be on stage or anything like that. But just the self enjoyment I find whe I remember an old riff or chord from way back when is a gift.

Thanks!
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  #239  
Old 03-17-2010, 02:30 PM
BubbaDog BubbaDog is offline
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Originally Posted by WordMan View Post
Wow - cool. I am going on March 24th in NJ, I believe.

What did you discuss with Eric? I stood next to him at a booth at the annual Arlington Vintage Guitar Show last year, but we didn't exchange more than a hello - he was too focused on a '54 Les Paul goldtop...drool...
Some of his comments (paraphrased by me)

Chris Layton has a way of pushing you yet relaxing you at the same time. He really enjoyed performing with him as it puts him into a mood where he can comfortably push out past some of his norms.

Susan Tedeschi was a joy to work with. I would have melted had I met her but the only other musicians we passed on the way to the bus were Kenny Wayne Shepherd and Noah Hunt (yep Noah wasn't mentioned in the preview info but I was glad he was there. I think he has a vocal presence similar to Hendrix)

Eric said that he believes Susan and hubby Derek are due for a combined tour.

He talked a bit about his early years and how he was playing at a hotel club when Eddie Van Halen came over and started chatting him up. Eric didn't realize at first that it was Eddie as VH was known but just starting to gain real success.

Really the only guitar subject he mentioned was a correcting me on a comment I made about KWS playing a left handed guitar upside down. It's a right handed guitar with a left handed neck on it. (I was in the balcony and the designs on his guitar made it look like the pots were on the high side and the Fender neck head was obviously left)

I wanted to ask him a question about how he got the tone on one of his songs (Good to Me) but didn't really want the conversation to turn into an interview.

I know you're going to enjoy the show Wordman. My favorite parts were of course Eric Johnson's set (especially when Susan Tedeschi joined him), Johnny Lang's and Kenny Wayne Shepherd's sets. Joe Satriani was just blazing but I think the soundman may have faltered on his set because it was muddy. I expect the Satriani set would be improved for your showing.
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  #240  
Old 03-17-2010, 03:26 PM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Originally Posted by BubbaDog View Post
Some of his comments (paraphrased by me)

Chris Layton has a way of pushing you yet relaxing you at the same time. He really enjoyed performing with him as it puts him into a mood where he can comfortably push out past some of his norms.

Susan Tedeschi was a joy to work with. I would have melted had I met her but the only other musicians we passed on the way to the bus were Kenny Wayne Shepherd and Noah Hunt (yep Noah wasn't mentioned in the preview info but I was glad he was there. I think he has a vocal presence similar to Hendrix)

Eric said that he believes Susan and hubby Derek are due for a combined tour.

He talked a bit about his early years and how he was playing at a hotel club when Eddie Van Halen came over and started chatting him up. Eric didn't realize at first that it was Eddie as VH was known but just starting to gain real success.

Really the only guitar subject he mentioned was a correcting me on a comment I made about KWS playing a left handed guitar upside down. It's a right handed guitar with a left handed neck on it. (I was in the balcony and the designs on his guitar made it look like the pots were on the high side and the Fender neck head was obviously left)

I wanted to ask him a question about how he got the tone on one of his songs (Good to Me) but didn't really want the conversation to turn into an interview.

I know you're going to enjoy the show Wordman. My favorite parts were of course Eric Johnson's set (especially when Susan Tedeschi joined him), Johnny Lang's and Kenny Wayne Shepherd's sets. Joe Satriani was just blazing but I think the soundman may have faltered on his set because it was muddy. I expect the Satriani set would be improved for your showing.

Wow - all cool stuff; thank you for sharing! I will chime in with a report when I see it in my neck of the woods...and yeah, I saw Derek Trucks last December and Marley indicated that it would be the last dTb show in a while because Derek and Susan are forming a Trucks/Tedeschi band - which sounds very cool...

And Craneop2 - again, looks like fun! You might - if you haven't already - do a search on this forum on the word guitar or something that isn't so broad. There are a large number of threads on tips for starting out, or getting back into guitar, etc. - I bet you might find some of them pretty good reading...

Last edited by WordMan; 03-17-2010 at 03:28 PM..
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  #241  
Old 03-17-2010, 04:24 PM
BigShooter BigShooter is offline
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Originally Posted by WordMan View Post
> I can't carve an arch top onto a body like a Les Paul has. Non-issue on most Bolt-ons. In fact, when Gibson decided to go with the Les Paul in '52, finally goaded into solid-body land because of the success of the Broad (renamed Tele) caster, they specifically went with a carved top so the guitar looked more craft-made vs. the "you can make it with a bandsaw" construction of a Fender...

Whaddya think?
Here's a bolt-on carved top body I made for a friend of mine - it can be done

http://i39.tinypic.com/30cvk1x.jpg

http://i41.tinypic.com/vebzio.jpg

No pics of the finished product, I'm afraid...
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  #242  
Old 03-17-2010, 04:40 PM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Originally Posted by BigShooter View Post
Here's a bolt-on carved top body I made for a friend of mine - it can be done

http://i39.tinypic.com/30cvk1x.jpg

http://i41.tinypic.com/vebzio.jpg

No pics of the finished product, I'm afraid...
Totally bitchin'!
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  #243  
Old 03-18-2010, 09:00 AM
BubbaDog BubbaDog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BubbaDog View Post
Some of his comments (paraphrased by me)

Chris Layton has a way of pushing you yet relaxing you at the same time. He really enjoyed performing with him as it puts him into a mood where he can comfortably push out past some of his norms.

[snip]
So I started reading my April issue of Guitar world last night and sure enough, Eric Johnson made this statement in it. Except he was talking about Mitch Mitchell (Hedrix's drummer who died in 2008 and played the previous tour with Johnson).

My guess is that the reporter taking notes got it right and the star struck Bubbadog got it wrong. Mr. E.J. was probably restating something he felt strongly about.

In my defense the subject of drummers came up when my friend mentioned Chris Layton (This tour and former Stevie Ray Vaughn Double Trouble stick man).

Since we fight ignorance here I just had to post my correction.

Now I'll just head over to the guitar build thread and try not to drool on my keyboard any more than usual.
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  #244  
Old 03-18-2010, 02:37 PM
BigShooter BigShooter is offline
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For those who haven't noticed, I started a build thread here:

http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...d.php?t=556186
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  #245  
Old 03-26-2010, 12:27 PM
E-Sabbath E-Sabbath is offline
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Okay. So my low E keeps buzzing when I fret it. It looks like it's actually hitting other frets. I've been told that if I fret 1 and 12, there should be a gap at 6. There isn't. I need to have my neck adjusted, right? Can I do this myself?

Last edited by E-Sabbath; 03-26-2010 at 12:27 PM..
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  #246  
Old 03-26-2010, 12:41 PM
Small Clanger Small Clanger is offline
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Originally Posted by E-Sabbath
I need to have my neck adjusted, right? Can I do this myself?
Yup, you'll need either a screw driver or a socket spanner (what was your guitar again?), just slacken the truss rod a 1/4 of a turn - let the neck settle for a while. If there's still no gap (relief) try adding another 1/4 turn at a time until there is.
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  #247  
Old 03-26-2010, 12:49 PM
Small Clanger Small Clanger is offline
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OK it's a Starcaster, maybe you'll need an Allen key? BTW you only want a tiny amount of bend in the neck.

I occurs to me you may not know what the truss rod is... Here you go.
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  #248  
Old 03-26-2010, 12:58 PM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Are you handy, E-Sabs? If so, then what Small Clanger says is spot on - take a shot. His approach of 1/4 turn, wait for the wood to settle a while (at least an hour or two) then see if it has helped, is good.

However - if you aren't sure you trust yourself, OR if you tried the above maybe 3 times (e.g., you've put about 3/4 of a full turn on the truss rod) - take it in to be looked at.

Remember that a guitar set up is a "system" - neck bend ("neck relief"), bridge height and intonation, overall neck angle (especially if the neck is a bolt-on and the angle can be adjusted), nut height - each piece contributes, a bunch of little issues can add up to a big playability issues, and tweaking one can typically result in the need to tweak another. That is all a way of saying: try a bit of an adjustment - if it works; yay. If it doesn't, get a proper set up...my $.02...
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  #249  
Old 03-26-2010, 01:03 PM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Doin' E-Sabs' job for him : here's a thread on guitar straps...
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  #250  
Old 03-26-2010, 03:07 PM
E-Sabbath E-Sabbath is offline
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Wait. I thought my neck was too _straight_. You're telling me to loosen the rod? I was thinking I might have to tighten it... reading the wiki article... aha! The strings, I neglected to allow for their tension.

Yeah, I knew what it was, but I wasn't sure what to do with it. Thanks, guys. Got a con to go to this weekend, but after that, it's guitar time.

Edit: Thanks, Wordman, for linkin the thread. Hadn't seen it myself.

Last edited by E-Sabbath; 03-26-2010 at 03:10 PM..
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