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  #51  
Old 06-07-2011, 01:57 PM
Speak to me Maddie! Speak to me Maddie! is offline
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I was a big Bowie fan as a young teen, then I grew up a little and realized that many of his songs I loved (Velvet Goldmine, Queen Bitch, etc.) were essentially about gay sex. It squicked me out to listen to them. Then I grew up a little more and wasn't bothered by it anymore, and I started listening again.

I'm glad John Lennon got a mention. I loved his solo work as a teen as well. Then I started to really listen to his lyrics and it slowly dawned on me that he was just a shallow, hubristic, narcissistic prick who could write good melodies. I can't listen to any of his stuff anymore without being repulsed.

Last edited by Speak to me Maddie!; 06-07-2011 at 01:58 PM.. Reason: dropped my "h"es
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  #52  
Old 06-07-2011, 02:06 PM
Wheelz Wheelz is offline
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Originally Posted by Hampshire View Post
Happy Boy by the Beat Farmers.

The rest of the song is about how the guys dog got hit by a car, he put the dead dog in a drawer, forgot about it for a month, then when he found it again laughed about it.
A month and a half.

That makes a difference.
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  #53  
Old 06-07-2011, 02:09 PM
Tranquilis Tranquilis is offline
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"Follow Me" by Uncle Kraker.

Nice catchy song, good hook. But then I really listened to the second verse. Killed it for me.
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  #54  
Old 06-07-2011, 02:20 PM
Tranquilis Tranquilis is offline
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Originally Posted by Irishman View Post
Too many to list, but off the top of my head:

Spirit in the Sky
Well, you can't be too shocked at Greenbaum getting his evangelical theology wrong - IIRC, he's Jewish.

*shrug*

Still a dang catchy tune, though I find myself wanting to yell at the radio occasionally that he's got it wrong.


Oh, and I see that Khadaji called out Uncle Kracker before I did.
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  #55  
Old 06-07-2011, 02:28 PM
WordMan WordMan is offline
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Originally Posted by Hampshire View Post
Happy Boy by the Beat Farmers.
That's just a weird song all around - I remember when it first came out.

I have to add Possum Kingdom by the Toadies - cool, rocking song until you realize it is about a serial killer luring a victim to their death.
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  #56  
Old 06-07-2011, 02:29 PM
PoorYorick PoorYorick is offline
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Originally Posted by Speak to me Maddie! View Post
I'm glad John Lennon got a mention. I loved his solo work as a teen as well. Then I started to really listen to his lyrics and it slowly dawned on me that he was just a shallow, hubristic, narcissistic prick who could write good melodies. I can't listen to any of his stuff anymore without being repulsed.
It's interesting you say that, just about everyone else goes on about his artistic vision. I always thought that he had one hell of a toxic personality, which makes Paul McCartney kind of a genius to just be able to work with him. He seems to have mellowed a bit as he got older, though. Hell, didn't he give David Chapman an autograph?
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  #57  
Old 06-07-2011, 03:43 PM
ministryman ministryman is offline
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Originally Posted by tumbleddown View Post
No, the music was written by Taupin, the lyrics were written by Elton, as with all of their songs.

It's pretty clear, to me, that it's about a man who's fallen in love with another man who was unsure, then began to return the affections, then got scared.
I was going to disagree with you, but then I put in my contacts and carefully read the lyrics. +1

One more song I won't be singing in the shower.
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  #58  
Old 06-07-2011, 05:33 PM
salinqmind salinqmind is offline
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I will pile on In The Summertime. It obviously states the rich daughter of the rich family is going to be taken out for a meal. If the other girl is poor, she (who would appreciate/could probably use a meal), will be subjected to whatever the man singer feels like doing. I thought this the first time I heard it eons ago, and I think this today. Unfair. Unfair to the poor girl. Why doesn't SHE get taken out to a restaurant? It's unfair, and cruel. Miss Bigbucks is a spoiled rich bitch who could very well pay for the male singer and her meal ten times over. Miss Poorgirl lives on food stamps. Which one deserves a date involving eating in a restaurant most?
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  #59  
Old 06-07-2011, 05:50 PM
Apollyon Apollyon is offline
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Originally Posted by Lynn Bodoni View Post
The song says it's OK to treat women differently based on whether or not they come from a rich or poor family.
I agree with your interpretation Lynn. The song also says it's OK to drink-and-drive.
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  #60  
Old 06-07-2011, 05:50 PM
Biffy the Elephant Shrew Biffy the Elephant Shrew is offline
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Originally Posted by ministryman View Post
One more song I won't be singing in the shower.
Just keep a firm grip on the soap and you'll be fine.
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  #61  
Old 06-07-2011, 10:08 PM
Sam A. Robrin Sam A. Robrin is offline
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Originally Posted by PoorYorick View Post
Maybe I'm just an innocent, but I think it's interesting that everyone apparently thinks that "do what you feel" means "fuck like jaded monkeys." To me, it meant that since you didn't have any money, you'd have to do something that didn't, you know, cost money. Didn't any of you guys ever go on a date when you were broke?
The same song also encourages the listener to "Have a drink, have a drive," which is kind of irresponsible advice to casually stick into a pop number.

Last edited by Sam A. Robrin; 06-07-2011 at 10:09 PM.. Reason: Beaten to the punch!
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  #62  
Old 06-08-2011, 01:16 AM
beartato beartato is offline
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Originally Posted by Morgyn View Post
The one I really grew to dislike after really listening to the words is the Stones' Under My Thumb.
I always thought it was a kind of cheeky little song where we were supposed to assume he didn't have nearly as much control over her as he thought. The girl was pushing him around, but then goes all subservient? I don't think so. The singer is convincing himself that the difference in the clothes she wears, etc., is because of him; the listener can figure out that it's actually him who's under her thumb.
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  #63  
Old 06-08-2011, 01:55 AM
panache45 panache45 is online now
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Originally Posted by tumbleddown View Post
It's pretty clear, to me, that it's about a man who's fallen in love with another man who was unsure, then began to return the affections, then got scared.
Even if your interpretation is correct, it's a common situation regardless of the genders involved. And anyway, nobody's gender is even mentioned in the song.
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  #64  
Old 06-08-2011, 07:42 AM
WOOKINPANUB WOOKINPANUB is offline
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Originally Posted by beartato View Post
I always thought it was a kind of cheeky little song where we were supposed to assume he didn't have nearly as much control over her as he thought. The girl was pushing him around, but then goes all subservient? I don't think so. The singer is convincing himself that the difference in the clothes she wears, etc., is because of him; the listener can figure out that it's actually him who's under her thumb.
Agreed. I never thought of it as anything but false bragging or wishful thinking out loud. Maybe because the music is so , I don't know, nuanced? Complex? Sorry, I don't know the correct word but something about the music doesn't match such a simplistic message.

Also, to those commenting on the "take a drinke take a drive" lyric, I don't think he's listing them as related activities; I think they're just two examples of what one can do in the summertime. Besides, MADD had not yet gotten it's hands around the collective conscious of society. Nobody was particularly concerned about drinking and driving.
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  #65  
Old 06-08-2011, 09:18 AM
StusBlues StusBlues is offline
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Originally Posted by Pliny the younger View Post
My entry is The Seed 2.0 by the Roots. Love the beat but what is up with the lyrics?

I only wanna fertilize another behind my lover's back
I sit and watch it grow standin' where I'm at
Fertilize another behind my lover's back
And I'm keepin' my secrets mine
Yeah, that song's pretty fucked up IMHO.
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  #66  
Old 06-08-2011, 10:23 AM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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Originally Posted by spark240 View Post
How do you possibly miss the lyrics to that? What did you think it was about?
Well, to be honest, I really wasn't much aware of the song. Heard the cool opening and all. But later encountered the song after becoming an atheist, and it just rubs me wrong. It wasn't the song that changed, it was me.

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Originally Posted by Wheelz View Post
I love Spirit in the Sky! I sing along, loudly, every time I hear it: "I never been a sinner, I never sinned... I got a friend in Jesuuuus!!"
Even though, you know, I have and I don't. It's still a kick-ass song.
Well, I just have a problem with that kind of message. It's a personal thing.


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Originally Posted by WordMan View Post
I have to add Possum Kingdom by the Toadies - cool, rocking song until you realize it is about a serial killer luring a victim to their death.
Agreed.
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  #67  
Old 06-08-2011, 01:03 PM
beartato beartato is offline
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Originally Posted by WOOKINPANUB View Post
Agreed. I never thought of it as anything but false bragging or wishful thinking out loud. Maybe because the music is so , I don't know, nuanced? Complex? Sorry, I don't know the correct word but something about the music doesn't match such a simplistic message.
Exactly. When I hear people claim the song is misogynistic, I just think they're not giving the guys enough credit. A song about a deluded guy who's dating a powerful, self-directed women but tries to brag to his buddies about how he's really the one calling the shots is a far more interesting song than a straight reading of the lyrics, simply "some jagwagon tells his girlfriend how to dress", would be. And I'm pretty sure Mick and Keef were aware of that.

The music's and Mick's tone are really important to getting it. I once heard a wannabe punk band, some "modern rock" artists, cover the song, spitting out the lyrics and sneering throughout. Without the marimba, without the playfullness of Mick's singing and that swagger, without any tongue-in-cheek feel, it just sounds like the nastiest meanest song you've ever heard. Context is key.
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  #68  
Old 06-08-2011, 01:48 PM
pakalolo pakalolo is offline
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I have to add Possum Kingdom by the Toadies - cool, rocking song until you realize it is about a serial killer luring a victim to their death.
While I admit that after listening to those lyrics I found the song a little bit disturbing, it does not keep me from enjoying it.
After all, I enjoy watching movies about serial killers. It does not mean I condone their actions, does it? How is enjoying a song about serial killers any different?

Slayer's "Silent Scream" I am told, is an anti-abortion song. In spite of that, I still think it rocks. I don't skip over it when I am listening to slayer, but it does disappoint me a bit somewhere in the back of my mind whenever I hear it.
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  #69  
Old 06-08-2011, 02:17 PM
Baron Greenback Baron Greenback is offline
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Originally Posted by Lynn Bodoni View Post
It MIGHT be a generational thing. This song came out in 1970, and that's when I heard it. And just about all the kids in my age group assumed that a girl with a poor father would be an easy, cheap screw, and that's how they interpreted the song. The guy always chose what sort of date it would be, unless the girl requested something special, and girls were cautioned to be considerate of their dates' wallets. So, a guy could choose to take his date to a fancy restaurant (and going out to eat was a much bigger thing then) or he could choose to just go riding around (and gas was much cheaper then, and cruising was pretty common among teens).
I wonder how much of this applies to Britain in 1970, where Mungo Jerry are from? I was just a toddler at the time.
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  #70  
Old 06-08-2011, 03:06 PM
Electric Warrior Electric Warrior is offline
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Originally Posted by Tranquilis View Post
Well, you can't be too shocked at Greenbaum getting his evangelical theology wrong - IIRC, he's Jewish.
In what way is it wrong? (I too have very little knowledge of evangelical theology, considering my family's religious background is Reform Jewish and Greek Orthodox.)

With regard to Under My Thumb, I respectfully disagree. I think Jagger/Richards are trying to create a portrait of a really despicable person, and the song is intended to make you uncomfortable when you realize you're being given the view from that person's eyes. Cf. The Beatles - Run for Your Life.

EDIT: My interpretation of In the Summertime is a little more charitable. I think it's slightly less that poor girls are cheap fucks, and more that if you don't take a girl with a rich father out for nice meals, you won't get to see her anymore, because Daddy will disapprove.

Last edited by Electric Warrior; 06-08-2011 at 03:07 PM..
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  #71  
Old 06-08-2011, 03:47 PM
filling_pages filling_pages is offline
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How I have always interpreted In the Summertime: we are a group of friends with no money who want to have a good time. If one of us is dating a gal with money, he'll go out to dinner and she'll pay. If not, we'll just do whatever we feel like - maybe drink a few beers, maybe go for a drive - that doesn't cost much. The final lyrics pretty much set it out:

If she's rich, if she's nice, bring your friends and we'll all go into town.

That is, if she's rich and too nice to say no, they'll all go out on her (daddy's) dime. Basically, a bunch of hippie guys who'd rather let their dates pay than get jobs when they'd rather go swimming.
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  #72  
Old 06-08-2011, 04:02 PM
WordMan WordMan is offline
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Originally Posted by pakalolo View Post
While I admit that after listening to those lyrics I found the song a little bit disturbing, it does not keep me from enjoying it.
After all, I enjoy watching movies about serial killers. It does not mean I condone their actions, does it? How is enjoying a song about serial killers any different?
I internalize music at a whole 'nother level vs. watching a show. Immersing myself into the persona in the song squicks me out in a much squickier way than if I saw the movie version. YMMV.
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  #73  
Old 06-08-2011, 04:33 PM
tumbleddown tumbleddown is offline
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Originally Posted by panache45 View Post
Even if your interpretation is correct, it's a common situation regardless of the genders involved. And anyway, nobody's gender is even mentioned in the song.
This is very true, and there is a cover by Oleta Adams (from the Two Rooms tribute to Taupin & John) that is absolutely gorgeously heart wrenching.
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  #74  
Old 06-08-2011, 04:40 PM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is online now
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Originally Posted by Electric Warrior View Post
With regard to Under My Thumb, I respectfully disagree. I think Jagger/Richards are trying to create a portrait of a really despicable person, and the song is intended to make you uncomfortable when you realize you're being given the view from that person's eyes.
I'm not sure that's what they intended. "The whole idea was that I was under HER, she was kicking ME around. So the whole idea is absurd, all I did was turn the tables around. So women took that to be against femininity where in reality it was trying to 'get back' against being a repressed male."
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  #75  
Old 06-08-2011, 05:43 PM
salinqmind salinqmind is offline
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Originally Posted by filling_pages View Post
How I have always interpreted In the Summertime: we are a group of friends with no money who want to have a good time. If one of us is dating a gal with money, he'll go out to dinner and she'll pay. If not, we'll just do whatever we feel like - maybe drink a few beers, maybe go for a drive - that doesn't cost much. The final lyrics pretty much set it out:

If she's rich, if she's nice, bring your friends and we'll all go into town.

That is, if she's rich and too nice to say no, they'll all go out on her (daddy's) dime. Basically, a bunch of hippie guys who'd rather let their dates pay than get jobs when they'd rather go swimming.
This is the very last time I'm going to harp on this, but...this is just absurd.
1) Forty years ago, it was unheard of for any girl, no matter how rich, to pay, out on a date. (exception: a couple in a real, intimate relationship, who arrived at an arrangement, not just casually dating, and she might slip him a few bucks under the table.) 2) It just didn't happen, no matter how much the hippie guys wished for handouts from a rich girl. Who weren't even hanging around with hippie guys, they were out dating rich boys. They may have gone slumming on occasion with a poor guy, but even so, they did not take him to the country club, hand him a menu, and say, "order anything you want, Daddy has an account here". 3) Any self respecting man forty years ago would feel like an impoverished loser, letting some woman pay.

Which leads back to: "if her daddy's rich, take her out for a meal". He will spend money on a date at a restaurant with a rich girl, because he wants to look like a nice young man who knows how to show a girl a good time. That - showing his daughter a good time - will also impress her rich Daddy, and that will come in handy should thoughts of marriage or a job offer at rich Daddy's business crop up in the future. Rich Daddy will be more inclined to welcome him to the family or give him a job. That would NOT happen if rich girl ponied up for the both of them, he would be seen as poor, shiftless, a leech, and a lazy bum.......So the poor girl doesn't get money spent on a restaurant meal - because he doesn't have to ingratiate himself with her poverty stricken father! The poor girl should just be grateful she's got a date at all, getting out of her shabby house, right?
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  #76  
Old 06-08-2011, 06:00 PM
Lamia Lamia is offline
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Re: "Spirit in the Sky"

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Originally Posted by Irishman View Post
Well, I just have a problem with that kind of message. It's a personal thing.
If it makes you feel any better about it, there was no serious religious intent behind the song. Norman Greenbaum apparently just wrote it to see if he could write a "gospel song" -- it could be taken as a sort of parody of none-too-deep religious pop music.

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Originally Posted by Electric Warrior View Post
In what way is it wrong? (I too have very little knowledge of evangelical theology, considering my family's religious background is Reform Jewish and Greek Orthodox.)
The song's narrator says he's not a sinner and that he's never sinned, while Evangelicals are generally big on the idea that everyone is a sinner and thus doomed to suffer hellfire unless they open their hearts to Jesus. I think almost every Christian denomination would disagree with the narrator's claim that he has never committed a sin.

By denying that he has ever sinned the narrator may actually be committing the "unforgivable sin" (in some denominations, at least) of rejecting the redemption offered by God. If he does not believe himself to be a sinner, then he's presumably not repenting of or asking to be forgiven for his sins.
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  #77  
Old 06-08-2011, 08:35 PM
Tranquilis Tranquilis is offline
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Originally Posted by Electric Warrior View Post
In what way is it wrong? (I too have very little knowledge of evangelical theology, considering my family's religious background is Reform Jewish and Greek Orthodox.)
Lamia basically nailed it.

My (ex) brother-in-law was lead guitar in a modestly successful Christian rock band. Their cover of "Spirit in the Sky" solved the theological issue very neatly. Instead of "I'm not a sinner / I've never sinned / I've got a friend named Jesus," his band sang "I'm a sinner / I know I've sinned / (but) I've got a friend named Jesus." Completely alters the theology of the song, and brings it into mainstream evangelism.

Last edited by Tranquilis; 06-08-2011 at 08:35 PM..
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  #78  
Old 06-08-2011, 09:23 PM
Edwardina Edwardina is offline
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Originally Posted by Lynn Bodoni View Post
Summertime or In the Summertime, by MungoJerry. "If her daddy's rich, take her out for a meal, if her daddy's poor, just do what you feel".
Yep. I used to love that song, until I parsed that part of it, since then I have never been able to enjoy it the same way.

Same for "Under My Thumb" as well.

I still kind of like "Follow Me," but it did take a hit when I found out what it was about.

As for "Possum Kingdom," I thought that song was about a vampire. Not that different from a serial killer, I suppose, they're both gonna kill ya. But at least with the vampire you (may) have eternal "life" to look forward to afterward.
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  #79  
Old 06-08-2011, 09:35 PM
Edwardina Edwardina is offline
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Oh, and how about Pumped Up Kicks by Foster The People? Sounds like just a cute little pop song until you really listen ...
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  #80  
Old 06-08-2011, 11:05 PM
Argent Towers Argent Towers is offline
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I used to think the title/chorus of the song Strange Overtones by David Byrne and Brian Eno was actually "strange are the tones."

I don't dislike the song, but I liked it a lot more when I wrongly thought it was called "Strange Are The Tones." That phrase is much more poetic and interesting to me than the real line.
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  #81  
Old 06-08-2011, 11:51 PM
FordTaurusSHO94 FordTaurusSHO94 is offline
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Originally Posted by Edwardina View Post
As for "Possum Kingdom," I thought that song was about a vampire. Not that different from a serial killer, I suppose, they're both gonna kill ya. But at least with the vampire you (may) have eternal "life" to look forward to afterward.
That's the way I've always interpreted it.
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  #82  
Old 06-09-2011, 01:18 AM
Askance Askance is offline
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Billy Thorpe's Most People I Know Think That I'm Crazy. Loved it (and suited the artist) until the last line.
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Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss View Post
John Lennon's Imagine. At first, it sounded like a bit of idealistic optimism. Then I realized it's just a Communist Manifesto masquerading as pop music!
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Originally Posted by Crafter_Man View Post
Same here. I used to like the song until I started paying attention to the lyrics. It's pretty obvious the song is an ode to communism.
Well yes, but if anything to the idealistic vision of early communist thought, not as it panned out to "communist" dictatorships. It's basically wishing that everyone got on with each other and didn't feel a need to subject themselves to authority, whether nationalistic, theistic or militaristic. Unrealistic hippy idealism, yes, but in no way condoning communism as practised.
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  #83  
Old 06-09-2011, 03:26 AM
foolsguinea foolsguinea is offline
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Originally Posted by Tim R. Mortiss View Post
John Lennon's Imagine. At first, it sounded like a bit of idealistic optimism. Then I realized it's just a Communist Manifesto masquerading as pop music!
As a Communist, I'm offended at being lumped in with that daffy utopian!

Seriously, though:
George Michael's "Father Figure" would be so much cooler without the phrase from the title. But I later came to understand what he was getting at.
"Jenny (867-5309)" is not commonly understood to be as creepy as it is.
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  #84  
Old 06-09-2011, 04:50 AM
Khadaji Khadaji is offline
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Originally Posted by Lamia View Post
Re: "Spirit in the Sky"

If it makes you feel any better about it, there was no serious religious intent behind the song. Norman Greenbaum apparently just wrote it to see if he could write a "gospel song" -- it could be taken as a sort of parody of none-too-deep religious pop music.

The song's narrator says he's not a sinner and that he's never sinned, while Evangelicals are generally big on the idea that everyone is a sinner and thus doomed to suffer hellfire unless they open their hearts to Jesus. I think almost every Christian denomination would disagree with the narrator's claim that he has never committed a sin.

By denying that he has ever sinned the narrator may actually be committing the "unforgivable sin" (in some denominations, at least) of rejecting the redemption offered by God. If he does not believe himself to be a sinner, then he's presumably not repenting of or asking to be forgiven for his sins.
Here is how it was explained to me by my ultra-Christian church: The blood of the lamb [Jesus] is so powerful it washes away our sins as if they never were.

When he says that he has never sinned it is because he accepted Jesus as his savior and his sins have been wiped clean.

As I no longer believe, I won't debate the interpretation, I'll just pass on what was told to me at the time.
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  #85  
Old 06-09-2011, 05:33 AM
Miss Mapp Miss Mapp is offline
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Originally Posted by Edwardina View Post

As for "Possum Kingdom," I thought that song was about a vampire. Not that different from a serial killer, I suppose, they're both gonna kill ya. But at least with the vampire you (may) have eternal "life" to look forward to afterward.
Me too. I liked it much more when I thought it was about a vampire asking his sweet angel to join him among the undead.
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  #86  
Old 06-09-2011, 08:43 AM
digs digs is offline
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Originally Posted by foolsguinea View Post
As a Communist, I'm offended at being lumped in with that daffy utopian!

Seriously, though:
George Michael's "Father Figure" would be so much cooler without the phrase from the title. But I later came to understand what he was getting at.
"Jenny (867-5309)" is not commonly understood to be as creepy as it is.
I wonder if my wife'll ever scroll through the contacts on my phone... and wonder that I've got one just listed as "Jenny". Could be trouble.

(Since my wife never listens to lyrics, I don't think my heartfelt plea of "But just look-- her number's 867-5309!" will help my case...)
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  #87  
Old 06-09-2011, 01:40 PM
filling_pages filling_pages is offline
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Originally Posted by salinqmind View Post
:rolleyes: This is the very last time I'm going to harp on this, but...this is just absurd.
1) Forty years ago, it was unheard of for any girl, no matter how rich, to pay, out on a date. (exception: a couple in a real, intimate relationship, who arrived at an arrangement, not just casually dating, and she might slip him a few bucks under the table.) 2) It just didn't happen, no matter how much the hippie guys wished for handouts from a rich girl. Who weren't even hanging around with hippie guys, they were out dating rich boys. They may have gone slumming on occasion with a poor guy, but even so, they did not take him to the country club, hand him a menu, and say, "order anything you want, Daddy has an account here". 3) Any self respecting man forty years ago would feel like an impoverished loser, letting some woman pay.

Which leads back to: "if her daddy's rich, take her out for a meal". He will spend money on a date at a restaurant with a rich girl, because he wants to look like a nice young man who knows how to show a girl a good time. That - showing his daughter a good time - will also impress her rich Daddy, and that will come in handy should thoughts of marriage or a job offer at rich Daddy's business crop up in the future. Rich Daddy will be more inclined to welcome him to the family or give him a job. That would NOT happen if rich girl ponied up for the both of them, he would be seen as poor, shiftless, a leech, and a lazy bum.......So the poor girl doesn't get money spent on a restaurant meal - because he doesn't have to ingratiate himself with her poverty stricken father! The poor girl should just be grateful she's got a date at all, getting out of her shabby house, right?
40 years ago my dad and all his friends were shiftless, poor hippies. To hear them tell it, they regularly went out with girls whose parents had plenty of cash, and those girls were paying for dinner, drinks, etc. Dad wasn't trying to look like a nice young man or get a job. He was trying to get someone to buy him a sexpack and a lid of weed and, if he was lucky, throw him a little action. That was why those gals were going out with dirty hippies (and, in the case of my dad and his friends, rock'n'roll musicians) - to piss off their parents and to feel like part of the cool scene.

When they went out with fellow poor hippies, they hopped in someone's car and rode down to the beach or all went and drank out of coolers at the drive in because they couldn't afford to go out on the town.

Maybe I'm off the mark. Could well be. But that's exactly what that song's always sounded like to me.
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  #88  
Old 06-09-2011, 02:27 PM
MeanOldLady MeanOldLady is offline
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"Under My Thumb," eh? I never knew that song was misogynistic until people told me it was. It had always given me the sense of that sick bit of triumph you feel when the lover who used to jerk your heart around is now your bitch.
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  #89  
Old 06-09-2011, 02:43 PM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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My usual contribution, which I still haven't beaten in terms of WTF-ness, is Sugar's "A Good Idea". It starts out with a guy and a gal taking a walk down to the river, and deciding it'd be 'a good idea' to lay down in the water. Chorus plays, and then the second verse starts thus:

Quote:
He held her head high in his hands
He held her down deep in the stream
He saw the bubbles and matted hair
Mixed in with seaweed
She started to scream


Yup, that rockin song is about a guy murdering some girl.

I still really like the song, though it probably wouldn't be a karaoke night pick!
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  #90  
Old 06-10-2011, 04:42 AM
Made in Macau Made in Macau is offline
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Originally Posted by Ferret Herder View Post
My usual contribution, which I still haven't beaten in terms of WTF-ness, is Sugar's "A Good Idea". It starts out with a guy and a gal taking a walk down to the river, and deciding it'd be 'a good idea' to lay down in the water. Chorus plays, and then the second verse starts thus:




Yup, that rockin song is about a guy murdering some girl.

I still really like the song, though it probably wouldn't be a karaoke night pick!
Don't know this song, but river, stream...seaweed?

MiM
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  #91  
Old 06-10-2011, 09:30 AM
Baal Houtham Baal Houtham is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamia View Post
Re: "Spirit in the Sky"

(...) it could be taken as a sort of parody of none-too-deep religious pop music.

(...)I think almost every Christian denomination would disagree with the narrator's claim that he has never committed a sin.
Just wanted to give yet another endorsement to this interpretation.

Is it deliberate parody? I wouldn't be surprised, but imagine that Greenbaum wanted the ambiguity. The charm is the way he doesn't tip his hand, just puts out his blatantly incorrect theology with a proud voice... but without winking.

The notion that he's singing after having his sins washed away is a possibility, but doesn't really match up with the idea that he has "never been a sinner." And even after the purification, you accumulate new sins almost immediately.

And of course the central idea of "going up to the Spirit in the Sky" is a unique explanation of the Christian afterlife. Again, it seems like Norm's just tossing out anything that occurs to him, without a care how true or untrue it is.

Great song.
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Old 06-11-2011, 09:37 PM
NotBob13 NotBob13 is offline
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My two cents on in the Summertime.
Veronica will snerl her nose at you if you suggest you grab a slaw burger at the drive-in, then wonder over to the river and watch the sun set. Betty is accustomed to similar low cost entertainment, probably. And Mr. Lodge is a bigwig', a VIP, probably freinds with the sherriff, and stiffnecked. Betty's dad is protective of her, but a cool guy, you'd share a beer with him, if the comics code would let you. That's always been my interpretation. In other words, you take out rich girls, you hang out with poor girls.
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  #93  
Old 06-11-2011, 11:17 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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Originally Posted by Miss Mapp View Post
Me too. I liked it much more when I thought it was about a vampire asking his sweet angel to join him among the undead.
Me as well, and wiki claims that it's based on folklore from where they grew up. Vampires are part of folklore, are serial killers? It's more subtle than say "Closer" by Kings of Leon but vampires make sense. Corpses rot, vampires stay beautiful forever.


I guess I like "Bone of Contention" by Spirit of the West a little less for knowing what it's about, but that's the only song I can think of like this.
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  #94  
Old 06-12-2011, 03:48 PM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamia View Post
Re: "Spirit in the Sky"

If it makes you feel any better about it, there was no serious religious intent behind the song. Norman Greenbaum apparently just wrote it to see if he could write a "gospel song" -- it could be taken as a sort of parody of none-too-deep religious pop music.
Doesn't matter what his religious intent was, he wrote it as a gospel song. And that's what gospel songs are. So he screwed up the theology a tad - that comes from being an outsider and not caring too much. It's still a gospel song.

And I can't take it as a parody.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MeanOldLady View Post
"Under My Thumb," eh? I never knew that song was misogynistic until people told me it was. It had always given me the sense of that sick bit of triumph you feel when the lover who used to jerk your heart around is now your bitch.
Yep. "The change has come, she's under my thumb." That Siamese Cat of a girl is now his bitch - my the tables have turned.
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Old 02-05-2017, 02:40 AM
Peace Rises Peace Rises is offline
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I used feel the same way. Then I read this opinion. Changed my mind on the meaning. http://barbarabythesea.blogspot.com/...ah-moment.html
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  #96  
Old 02-05-2017, 02:51 AM
Peace Rises Peace Rises is offline
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Big T about HALLELUJAH by Leonard Cohen

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Originally Posted by BigT View Post
I don't dislike the song, but I stopped wanting to sing it for church when I looked up the lyrics for Hallelujah by Cohen.
I used feel the same way. Then I read this opinion. Changed my mind on the meaning.
http://barbarabythesea.blogspot.com/...ah-moment.html
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  #97  
Old 02-05-2017, 03:01 AM
Peace Rises Peace Rises is offline
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Tranquilis, you're right

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Originally Posted by Tranquilis View Post
"Follow Me" by Uncle Kraker.

Nice catchy song, good hook. But then I really listened to the second verse. Killed it for me.
I had to go look it up. WOW, had no idea "I'm not worried
'bout the ring you wear
'cause as long as no one knows
Then nobody can care,"

pretty sucky, I agree!
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  #98  
Old 02-05-2017, 07:17 AM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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The Zombies had a few songs with questionable lyrics.


mmm
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  #99  
Old 02-05-2017, 01:38 PM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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Originally Posted by PoorYorick View Post
The classic example for me will always be "Alone Again (Naturally)" by Gilbert O'Sullivan, where a man laments his crappy life before jumping to his death, all to a snappy beat.

ETA: Although I admit I still liked the song even after learning the lyrics. I'm sick.
I realize this is old, but along those lines, "Jump" by Van Halen - really upbeat song about commuting suicide.
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  #100  
Old 02-05-2017, 01:49 PM
Irishman Irishman is online now
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Originally Posted by tumbleddown View Post
It's pretty clear, to me, that it's about a man who's fallen in love with another man who was unsure, then began to return the affections, then got scared.
Also lines


" Too late to save myself from falling
I took a chance and changed your way of life
But you misread my meaning when I met you
Closed the door and left me blinded by the light."

"Changed your way of life", "misread my meaning" can be interpreted that way pretty easily. But they are vague enough to apply in a lot of situations.
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