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  #51  
Old 12-12-2011, 04:14 PM
typoink typoink is offline
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Originally Posted by tr0psn4j View Post
I have a Bialetti, or whatever they're called. I found it very inconsistent and got something I didn't loathe maybe 10% of the time. A few times, I couldn't get the steam to pass through the grounds. Eventually I figured out what I was doing wrong. After that, I'd get bored waiting or get distracted and come back to have all the espresso boiled out into a super condensed sludge.
!

Bialettis should be pretty simple, but finding the right fill line and using properly-ground coffee is critical. Without a burr grinder, they're probably worthless.

I'll admit I don't actually have a standard 4-cup Moka, though. I have a 2-cup Brikka, which is amazing. It has a weighted valve over the spout that adds a little pressure through the grounds. Darn tasty. Also have a 6-cup stainless model that works extremely nice when I have guests. I intend to buy a 4-cup at some point since that's the "classic" and it's probably the right size making two mugs of coffee.
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  #52  
Old 12-12-2011, 05:46 PM
Jaledin Jaledin is offline
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Still buy the cheapest ground in a can, in a French Press, as I always have, but I found the greatest thing for lightener.

Powdered goat milk. I fill a thermos with my sludgy brew, and pour some goat's milk in it, give it a shake to dissolve, and it's damned good. Hard to find powdered full-fat milk, maybe outside of backpacking stores, but this is better, and fattier, I think.
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  #53  
Old 12-12-2011, 07:07 PM
standingwave standingwave is offline
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Originally Posted by Jaledin View Post
Still buy the cheapest ground in a can, in a French Press,
Believe it or not, Walmart's 100% Colombia coffee did surprisingly well in a Consumer Reports taste test a couple months ago. $3.88 for an 11.3 oz. container. I keep it around for when I run out of whole beans. Otherwise it's Sumatra Mandheling from a local roaster and run through my French press.
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  #54  
Old 12-13-2011, 11:48 AM
tr0psn4j tr0psn4j is offline
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Originally Posted by typoink View Post
!

Bialettis should be pretty simple, but finding the right fill line and using properly-ground coffee is critical. Without a burr grinder, they're probably worthless.

I'll admit I don't actually have a standard 4-cup Moka, though. I have a 2-cup Brikka, which is amazing. It has a weighted valve over the spout that adds a little pressure through the grounds. Darn tasty. Also have a 6-cup stainless model that works extremely nice when I have guests. I intend to buy a 4-cup at some point since that's the "classic" and it's probably the right size making two mugs of coffee.
Yeah I have a Capresso Infinity conical burr grinder. I think my grinds were too fine and, therefore, getting packed in too tight. I made it one or two settings coarser and put it in the bowl loosely and didn't have that specific problem anymore.
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  #55  
Old 12-13-2011, 03:24 PM
Oslo Ostragoth Oslo Ostragoth is offline
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freckafree: Consumer Reports' guide to coffee characteristics is similar to your list.
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  #56  
Old 12-13-2011, 03:42 PM
typoink typoink is offline
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Originally Posted by tr0psn4j View Post
Yeah I have a Capresso Infinity conical burr grinder. I think my grinds were too fine and, therefore, getting packed in too tight. I made it one or two settings coarser and put it in the bowl loosely and didn't have that specific problem anymore.
Hey, same grinder. My experience with my mokas is that the coarse end of "fine" is the sweet spot. Sadly, I haven't used the pots in about a year because I need to replace all the gaskets and am lazy about ordering them.
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  #57  
Old 12-13-2011, 08:35 PM
Oslo Ostragoth Oslo Ostragoth is offline
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I'm trying Pioneer Woman's cold brew method. I'll let you know how it goes.
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  #58  
Old 12-13-2011, 08:40 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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After 2 days of good but not fantastic shots, I fiddled with the grind and tamp a bit tonight and I made two 'godshot' ristrettos! Yummm........
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  #59  
Old 12-13-2011, 11:33 PM
dzero dzero is offline
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Does anyone roast their own coffee? It seems to be something of a black art.
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  #60  
Old 12-16-2011, 02:36 PM
lindsaybluth lindsaybluth is offline
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Does anyone have favorite how-to books, guides, or online sources?

I'd like to read up on handling, storage, variations, pricing, etc.

Also, what's the skinny on how to keep beans fresh -- I've read conflicting things; don't buy anything more than 5 days after it's been roasted (and ask what the roast date is), refrigerate or freeze beans (and DON'T do either), drink the beans you purchase within a week, etc. I have no idea who\what to believe.
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  #61  
Old 12-16-2011, 07:06 PM
Mind's Eye, Watering Mind's Eye, Watering is offline
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Does anyone roast their own coffee? It seems to be something of a black art.
I do. It's not hard to do if you have the right equipment.

I have the Hearthware I-Roast 2 which has pretty flexible programing for temp/time. I usually do about two roasts a week to support me and my family.

I get green beans from either Sweet Maria's or Coffee Bean Corral.

I also have a Capresso burr grinder, a Technivorm coffee maker, and several french presses.
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  #62  
Old 12-16-2011, 07:40 PM
Tapiotar Tapiotar is offline
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I use a hand-crank grinder, and an Aeropress coffee maker. I liked the Resurrection Blend from Raven's Brew Coffee that i got at the co-op, until I found Kaña Cuban style coffee at a Fresh Market store down in Florida. The Havana blend is pre-ground, but very very smooth, as smooth as Jamaican Blue Mountain, at one third the price! There is also an espresso roast in beans, unground, but I'm so happy with the Havana, I haven't tried it.
Oh, I also use heavy whipping cream and sweetener, which bring out decided chocolate notes to my taste buds.
http://www.kanacubancoffee.net/
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  #63  
Old 12-16-2011, 07:47 PM
Tapiotar Tapiotar is offline
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Originally Posted by Unauthorized Cinnamon View Post
I like coffee, but it's often too harsh for my taste. I find that cold brewing really helps. I follow the instructions from The Pioneer Woman Cooks, and it works great.
Thanks for the link! I will try this, come summer.
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  #64  
Old 12-17-2011, 06:11 PM
China Guy China Guy is offline
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Originally Posted by Mind's Eye, Watering View Post
I do. It's not hard to do if you have the right equipment.

I have the Hearthware I-Roast 2 which has pretty flexible programing for temp/time. I usually do about two roasts a week to support me and my family.
Any problems with the machine? I see a lot of complaints that these wear out/break pretty fast.
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  #65  
Old 12-17-2011, 06:20 PM
typoink typoink is offline
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In terms of storage, I have a Bean Vac and love it. I never would have bought one, since it seems gimmicky, but I got one as a gift and really like it. Seems to make a huge difference. I'm a slow coffee drinker, so a pound can last up to a month. I used to throw out a lot of stale coffee, but the Bean Vac keeps it fresh. It still tastes best fresh, of course.

It runs on 4 AAs, so I just use a set of Duracell Rechargables. Needs to be charged every two or three months.
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  #66  
Old 12-17-2011, 07:55 PM
Anamorphic Anamorphic is offline
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Originally Posted by Mind's Eye, Watering View Post
I do. It's not hard to do if you have the right equipment.

I have the Hearthware I-Roast 2 which has pretty flexible programing for temp/time. I usually do about two roasts a week to support me and my family.
I have the Fresh Roast Plus 8, but I think I've outgrown it - I'd definitely like to move up in amount I can roast at once and control I have. I haven't decided on a new one yet, but I'm looking at one of the low-level drum roasters, like the Behmor 1600.

I also get my green beans from Sweet Maria's. I just got a Costa Rica that I'm very happy with.
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  #67  
Old 12-17-2011, 08:32 PM
DSeid DSeid is offline
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Barratza Maestro Plus Burr grinder.

I like French Press best. 32 oz Bodum. Prewarm before making the coffee. 60 grams on the kitchen scale, ground at a setting of 28. Let steep 3 minutes. Prewarm the cup. My wife prefers Chemex or "pour over" (and yes she has one of those kettles).

She has several local places to get beans she frequents. Currently we have some Ethiopian Sidamo from a place called Buzz and some Los Andes El Salvador and some Guatemala Puerta Verde both made by Heart Roasters but locally (Chicago) at Caffe Streets. All good stuff. Intelligentsia is often spoke of highly around here but I am not so impressed. I also like Metropolis though.

The Chemex and pour over methods make for a cleaner flavor; the French Press gets out more complexities. The FP also gives some mouth feel, which I like.

All day I get by sipping on our office Keurigs.

Yes, I get a headache if I don't drink for a day ... but I can quit any time, I swear!

Last edited by DSeid; 12-17-2011 at 08:36 PM..
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  #68  
Old 12-18-2011, 08:22 AM
Mind's Eye, Watering Mind's Eye, Watering is offline
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Any problems with the machine? I see a lot of complaints that these wear out/break pretty fast.
I've heard the same, but mine's been running for two and a half years now. No breakage or problems.
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  #69  
Old 12-19-2011, 11:24 AM
Aeris Aeris is offline
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Originally Posted by Brown Eyed Girl View Post
I want one of these so bad. And an Aeropress, too! If I didn't already have one, though, I'd spend my money on a burr grinder first. I have the one one from Starbucks and it's been going strong for over ten years now. You should have a burr grinder once you've a) decided to brew coffee any other method than drip, b) start spending good money on fresh, quality whole beans, and c) are tired of overextracted (bitter) or underextracted (weak) coffee. French press requires a coarser uniform grind than blade grinders can produce. If your coffee is not uniform, you will either not extract enough of the flavor from insufficiently ground beans at the top of the grind or you will create a bitter coffee sludge from coffee powder from under the blade that seeps through the filter.
Hmmm...maybe this is my problem. I was actually going to start a thread to ask if anyone knew what the problem was with my coffee.

I bought a Bodum French Press and I believe I have an electric blade grinder (I'm new to this so I'm not sure that's what it is). At first everything was fine and the coffee was better than anything I had ever tasted but after a few months the coffee started tasting a little....powdery? I'm not sure that's the right word but there is definite dust left in my cup once I get near the bottom. What is this and how to I make it stop? Do I need a burr grinder? What is that? Hopefully it's not expensive.
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  #70  
Old 12-19-2011, 11:32 AM
Rex Goliath Rex Goliath is offline
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Originally Posted by Aeris View Post
Hmmm...maybe this is my problem. I was actually going to start a thread to ask if anyone knew what the problem was with my coffee.

I bought a Bodum French Press and I believe I have an electric blade grinder (I'm new to this so I'm not sure that's what it is). At first everything was fine and the coffee was better than anything I had ever tasted but after a few months the coffee started tasting a little....powdery? I'm not sure that's the right word but there is definite dust left in my cup once I get near the bottom. What is this and how to I make it stop? Do I need a burr grinder? What is that? Hopefully it's not expensive.
Nope. A little bit of sludge is to be expected at the bottom of your cup. It's the number one reason I stopped using one. You can try using a coarser grind, but there's since a french press is unfiltered, you'll always have a little bit of undrinkable coffee at the bottom.

Am I the only one who uses an Aeropress? It makes a weird hybrid espresso/americano thing that, if tweaked just right, tastes pretty darned good. All the taste of a french press in half the time. I love it.

Last edited by Rex Goliath; 12-19-2011 at 11:32 AM..
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  #71  
Old 12-19-2011, 12:32 PM
Anamorphic Anamorphic is offline
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Originally Posted by Rex Goliath View Post
Am I the only one who uses an Aeropress? It makes a weird hybrid espresso/americano thing that, if tweaked just right, tastes pretty darned good. All the taste of a french press in half the time. I love it.
Nope! I love my Aeropress, and started a thread about it here a while back. Yes, you have to experiment (and not follow the directions that come with it - particularly the part about water temperature), but you can get an excellent cup of coffee out of it with very little work.
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  #72  
Old 12-19-2011, 05:15 PM
DSeid DSeid is offline
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Originally Posted by Aeris View Post
.. Bodum French Press and I believe I have an electric blade grinder ... there is definite dust left in my cup once I get near the bottom. What is this and how to I make it stop? Do I need a burr grinder? What is that? Hopefully it's not expensive.
1) A burr grinder set for a moderately coarse grind will cut down very significantly on that which you refer to as "dust". The blade grinder creates a wide variety of particle sizes, "from boulders to dust", and has many more that are therefore small enough to get through the metal mesh filter. The more uniform grind size created by the burr grinder much less so.

2) It will not eliminate effect however. It is the very attribute that many of us love about French Press coffee as it creates the mouth feel that some of us crave. You may be after a "cleaner" albeit less fully complex style, and for that a Chemex or pour-over may be more your ... nah, not cup of tea.

Coffee is all about finding your preferred individual preference.
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  #73  
Old 12-20-2011, 12:40 AM
VOW VOW is offline
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My God! I am in AWE of this thread!

And COLD brewed coffee? I consider COLD coffee to be illegal, immoral, or sacrilegious. Coffee is meant to be consumed HOT.


~VOW
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  #74  
Old 01-15-2012, 04:28 PM
tr0psn4j tr0psn4j is offline
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My coffee subscription ran out two weeks ago. I'm stuck drinking a pack of Starbucks Breakfast Blend until I have enough money to renew it.

This coffee costs a couple of dollars less but isn't even half as good.
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  #75  
Old 01-15-2012, 04:48 PM
The Dord The Dord is offline
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I feel like a commoner because I like 8 o'clock coffee columbian flavor in my $49 hamilton coffee maker
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  #76  
Old 01-15-2012, 05:10 PM
lindsaybluth lindsaybluth is offline
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I feel like a commoner because I like 8 o'clock coffee columbian flavor in my $49 hamilton coffee maker
Please don't! Many of us in the thread just "got into" coffee. I know personally that if a regular cup o' joe hadn't given me such acid reflux every now and then that I would never have sought out other methods.

As a side note, I have no palate for fine tea. I enjoy fruity ones at friends' tea parties but I'd never pay what they pay for tea (I bring nice snacks ). But I certainly can't tell an enormous difference between the little Lipton pyramid bags and the fine stuff sold at a specialty tea store.

I finally found a tasty decaf; locally roasted and I get only 1\3rd of a pound weekly. I find it "goes bad" quickly whereas a regular bag won't. Good decaf is much harder to come by, but there are nights when I crave the flavor and it's too close to bedtime to get the good stuff.

I like a cup of Aeropress at the local shop but really, I prefer the oils and "sludge" of french press. I actually leave my stirrer in my cup to swish around before taking a sip.
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  #77  
Old 01-15-2012, 05:15 PM
Alice The Goon Alice The Goon is offline
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I won a DeLonghi Espresso/Cappucino maker- woot! I haven't gotten it yet, but when I do, I might have questions. And if anyone has advice that hasn't been gone over yet, please post it. I'll never have to go to Starbucks again!
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  #78  
Old 01-15-2012, 05:22 PM
StuffLikeThatThere StuffLikeThatThere is offline
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Originally Posted by Unauthorized Cinnamon View Post
I like coffee, but it's often too harsh for my taste. I find that cold brewing really helps. I follow the instructions from The Pioneer Woman Cooks, and it works great. I typically go semi-hedonistic, with sweetened condensed milk and fat free half and half. With those add-ins, Eight O'Clock coffee, pre-ground, works just fine. If I wanted to drink it straight, I'd go for something with a bit more body and caramel notes, fresh-ground.
This is now how I prefer my coffee, even in the dead of winter. I use a pre-ground fair trade french roast that the local grocery chain ships in from somewhere, and brew 12 oz. at a time and store it in glass in the fridge. When I make myself a cup, I use whole milk and some sugar. I love it.
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  #79  
Old 01-19-2012, 11:34 AM
Goldfishs Goldfishs is offline
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Does anyone know of a machine similar to a Keurig but available in Australia? I'm looking for something with the variety of flavours and the pods are really appealing. I haven't had much luck looking so far.
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  #80  
Old 01-23-2012, 06:59 PM
Oslo Ostragoth Oslo Ostragoth is offline
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I'm trying Pioneer Woman's cold brew method. I'll let you know how it goes.
I have made two batches so far, both more concentrated than PW. Both were bold enough that I could add nearly an equal amount of cold water. I am usually a half-and-half guy, but the cold-brewed method results in a nice mellow drink.

Next I am going to try kicking it up a notch. The first two batches were made with a flat basket (medium) grind. For the next batch, I'll try using a conical basket (medium-fine grind), and start the brew with some boiling water. It should result in a bolder taste.
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  #81  
Old 02-01-2017, 12:14 AM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
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I want one of these so bad. And an Aeropress, too! If I didn't already have one, though, I'd spend my money on a burr grinder first. I have the one one from Starbucks and it's been going strong for over ten years now. You should have a burr grinder once you've a) decided to brew coffee any other method than drip, b) start spending good money on fresh, quality whole beans, and c) are tired of overextracted (bitter) or underextracted (weak) coffee. French press requires a coarser uniform grind than blade grinders can produce. If your coffee is not uniform, you will either not extract enough of the flavor from insufficiently ground beans at the top of the grind or you will create a bitter coffee sludge from coffee powder from under the blade that seeps through the filter.
Reviving this wonderful thread to report that my Barista grinder has been sidelined until I get the bravery to take it apart and try to fix it. I have since acquired several manual burr grinders for various purposes and I'm really enjoying using them.

I started out with a Porlex Mini Grinder, which is stainless steel and as beautiful as it is functional -- to use while camping and backpacking with an Aeropress. I use a mesh filter with the Aeropress so I don't lose any of the flavor in the oils. Unfortunately, I inadvertently broke one of the ceramic burrs of the Porlex while cleaning and apparently the only North American supplier of that part is in Canada and the shipping alone would cost more than a new grinder.

So I replaced it with a GSI JavaMill that I got at a discount. It also has ceramic burrs, so it works great, but it's plastic housing and parts lack the sophistication of the Porlex. Why this matters to me, I don't know, but I generally value metal and glass designs over plastic. Both the GSI and Porlex are basically single serving gizmos but working a little harder for good coffee doesn't bother me when I'm backpacking/camping. I wouldn't want to use either for daily use for two people who suck down coffee like our lives depend on, so when the Barista died, it was time to buy a new grinder.

I've had my eye on the Baratza Virtuoso because I know when you use a grinder as much as we do for a variety of brewing styles from espresso to french press, you need a really good grinder. My last one lasted over 14 years, so I feel like it's an investment. But my spouse has tinnitus and has been happy enough using a hand mill, so I decided to look for one with a larger capacity. The Hario Skerton is the ticket! And because I didn't spend over $200 on a grinder, my dearest let me buy a 6-cup Bialetti! Oh joy! It came in yesterday and ever since I've been grinding and brewing trying to get it just right. Who needs sleep? It's tricky and I burned by first batch, but it still tasted way better than the shitty thermal french press I've been stuck with. The grind for it is not quite as fine as espresso, but still fine and I've got it flowing nicely. The only problem I'm having is that it when it starts to sputter (the cue for removing it from the heat) there's still an ounce or two of water left in the bottom. Is that normal or do I need to keep adjusting things? I'm starting with hot water and have my heating element set to 6. Any ideas from other moka pot aficionados?

By the way, I'll need to upgrade to the 12-cup soon. Even though I'm making Americanos, 6 (Italian) cups is not nearly enough to get me and my spouse going. I think I might end up with a shrine to coffee in my kitchen.

ETA: freckafree, are you still evaluating coffees?

Last edited by Brown Eyed Girl; 02-01-2017 at 12:16 AM.. Reason: forgot to add...
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  #82  
Old 02-01-2017, 12:36 AM
Dr. Strangelove Dr. Strangelove is online now
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While it's been revived:

Grinder: Baratza Vario. This is now my favorite kitchen device, and perhaps my favorite mechanical device in my possession. It's just this dense hunk of stainless steel. It's really a fantastic grinder and I'm not sorry for spending ~$400 on it.

Espresso machine: Crossland Coffee CC1. Perfectly adequate and well made. The UI is a little finicky but I've gotten used to it.

Daily cuppa: Aeropress. I'm not sure if I should be embarrassed that this gets far more use than the espresso maker. It really is just a perfect little device for a cup of coffee. Nuke some water, grind the beans, set up the unit, and press. <5 min from start to finish.

Beans: Nice local roaster called Chromatic Coffee. Though expensive; I'd like to find one that's a few steps above Peet's but without costing twice as much. Might have to go mail order on this one... anything reasonable that I can get on Amazon Prime?
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  #83  
Old 02-10-2017, 07:15 AM
sms339 sms339 is offline
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Sorry to hijack the thread, but I'm ashamedly a Starbucks drinker. I'm well aware of --- and frankly agree with -- most people's complaints about the brand.
Has Starbucks always tasted "burnt", dating back to the '70s in Seattle?
And if so, how did it rise in popularity and become so ubiquitous?
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  #84  
Old 02-10-2017, 08:01 PM
Balthisar Balthisar is offline
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Originally Posted by sms339 View Post
Sorry to hijack the thread, but I'm ashamedly a Starbucks drinker. I'm well aware of --- and frankly agree with -- most people's complaints about the brand.
Has Starbucks always tasted "burnt", dating back to the '70s in Seattle?
And if so, how did it rise in popularity and become so ubiquitous?
Hard to hijack a zombie, but yes, if you order drip coffee it has always tasted burnt. If you order an Americano, though, it's tolerable, but you can order an American anyplace else at a bargain -- except at other trendy places that want to sell you coffee-based drinks instead of actual coffee.
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  #85  
Old 02-10-2017, 08:32 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
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Well, since this thread had been revived...

Anyone here make Turkish coffee, with an ibrik? I had some recently at a Middle Eastern restaurant and loved it! It's rich and strong and sweet. Can I grind the coffee fine enough on the finest setting on by burr grinder?
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  #86  
Old 02-11-2017, 07:51 PM
Balthisar Balthisar is offline
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I guess this is a good place to lament that my burr grinder was DOA this morning, and I had to use an old blade grinder. On the plus side my coffee tasted a bit like cinnamon this morning, because I save the blade grinder for spices.
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  #87  
Old 02-11-2017, 10:46 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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We have the following:

A Zojirushi drip, which makes excellent coffee, and consistently produces water over 200F.

A Breville burr grinder.

A great DeLonghi espresso maker that is only 6" wide, so fits perfectly on the counter next to the other two.

A French press in the RV. Takes up very little space and is quick and easy.

We used to buy local roast beans, but have gotten back on a piñon coffee kick after our last visit to New Mexico. We order the beans from New Mexico Piñon Coffee Company. They'll ship any size order for a flat $10. Good stuff.
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  #88  
Old 02-12-2017, 08:09 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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How many of you have ever done an actual "taste test", drinking cups of coffee side by side, made completely differently or of different coffees? Is your preference for "your" coffee just confirmation bias?
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  #89  
Old 02-12-2017, 05:54 PM
Tapiotar Tapiotar is offline
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Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
Well, since this thread had been revived...

Anyone here make Turkish coffee, with an ibrik? I had some recently at a Middle Eastern restaurant and loved it! It's rich and strong and sweet. Can I grind the coffee fine enough on the finest setting on by burr grinder?
I have done this several times. There is definitely an art to it, and I've made terrible coffee far more often than I've made the delicious kind that I had in Turkey.
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  #90  
Old 02-12-2017, 05:56 PM
Tapiotar Tapiotar is offline
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Does anyone here make coffee with a vacuum pot? I found a beautiful old stainless steel Nicro vacuum system in a back cupboard at my parents' house, and am eager to try it out. Unfortunately, I haven't yet found the stainless steel filter that goes with it. I was in a biding war for one on eBay, but the price went too high, so I dropped out.
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  #91  
Old 02-12-2017, 08:38 PM
Balthisar Balthisar is offline
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Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
A Breville burr grinder.
How's the Breville work out for you? Last night I lamented the death of my burr grinder (a Cuisinart) right in this very thread, and today I unfortunately ended up stuck in a mall today where I fortunately remembered I needed a new grinder. My choices were a Breville for a hundred bucks, which sounds like a no-name brand, and a Cuisinart for fifty bucks.

Yeah, yeah, I ended up with the Cuisinart which is literally identical to the one that died yesterday and the one that died in 2011. If figured it it broke again, I was only out $50 rather than $100.

Serves me right for not using my Amazon Prime and reading reviews first, but, ya know, coffee is a right now thing.
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  #92  
Old 02-12-2017, 10:48 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Balthisar View Post
How's the Breville work out for you? Last night I lamented the death of my burr grinder (a Cuisinart) right in this very thread, and today I unfortunately ended up stuck in a mall today where I fortunately remembered I needed a new grinder. My choices were a Breville for a hundred bucks, which sounds like a no-name brand, and a Cuisinart for fifty bucks.

Yeah, yeah, I ended up with the Cuisinart which is literally identical to the one that died yesterday and the one that died in 2011. If figured it it broke again, I was only out $50 rather than $100.

Serves me right for not using my Amazon Prime and reading reviews first, but, ya know, coffee is a right now thing.
I bought this one in 2012, and it's still cranking out the coffee dust. It was expensive, but had good reviews, and amortized over the five years I've had it, it only comes out to just over $60/yr.
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  #93  
Old 02-15-2017, 02:07 AM
Girl From Mars Girl From Mars is offline
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Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
I bought this one in 2012, and it's still cranking out the coffee dust. It was expensive, but had good reviews, and amortized over the five years I've had it, it only comes out to just over $60/yr.
We have the same one; the only modification I made was after reading reviews on the CoffeeSnobs forum, that said it might not grind fine enough - the recommendation was to contact Breville and they would send a couple of washers which could be fitted to add a few extra dials - which they did without question. Had it about 4-5 years now, still going strong.
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  #94  
Old 02-15-2017, 03:36 AM
madmonk28 madmonk28 is offline
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I really like my double walled stainless steel French press. It hits the sweet spot of great coffee without being too elaborate or expensive. For beans, there is a coffee roaster in Sperryville, VA that has great beans (http://www.centralcoffeeroasters.com). They are also some of the nicest people I've ever met, seriously; I stop in when I'm fly fishing in the mountains nearby and end up talking for like 30 minutes about whatever. So now, I associate coffee from there with brook trout and friendly faces.
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  #95  
Old 02-15-2017, 07:04 AM
Balthisar Balthisar is offline
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Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
I bought this one in 2012, and it's still cranking out the coffee dust. It was expensive, but had good reviews, and amortized over the five years I've had it, it only comes out to just over $60/yr.
That's quite a step up from even the retail one I saw. Added to my save for later list on Amazon.
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  #96  
Old 02-15-2017, 09:15 AM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Originally Posted by Girl From Mars View Post
We have the same one; the only modification I made was after reading reviews on the CoffeeSnobs forum, that said it might not grind fine enough - the recommendation was to contact Breville and they would send a couple of washers which could be fitted to add a few extra dials - which they did without question. Had it about 4-5 years now, still going strong.
I've found that the fine grind works well for espresso, but I'm not an expert on these things. I rarely use the fine setting, as we use a drip maker for everyday use.
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  #97  
Old 02-15-2017, 10:14 AM
racer72 racer72 is offline
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My weekend coffee is made in a Bodum French press, beans ground in a Baratza Encore burr grinder (#30 setting), water heated to about 200 degrees in a Cuisinart water boiler. The second cup of coffee is kept hot in an Ikea insulated carafe that keeps the coffee hot for a number of hours. Most of my coffees have come from Raven's Brew, currently enjoying their 3 peckered Billy goat. Just ordered some beans from Sagebrush coffee.

My Monday through Friday coffee comes from my Cuisinart coffee maker.
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