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  #101  
Old 12-19-2016, 07:13 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Alan Baxter graduated from Williams College -- and, after getting work on Broadway in the 1930s, was top billed in movies like RAGS TO RICHES and BORROWED HERO and PRISONER OF JAPAN and CLOSE-UP and BEHIND PRISON WALLS in the 1940s.

That said, Baxter also got a lot of supporting-actor work in Hollywood -- that's him as Jesse James in BAD MEN OF MISSOURI, and that's him in a Jimmy Cagney picture, and that's him in an Errol Flynn picture, and that's him in one of the THIN MAN outings by William Powell and Myrna Loy -- heck, that's him in WINGED VICTORY, reprising the part he played on Broadway! -- and that's him in various other movies where he was second-billed to his leading lady du jour.

But, yeah, that's also him -- top-billed -- in stuff like MY SON IS A CRIMINAL as well as IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU, is my point.
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  #102  
Old 12-20-2016, 08:59 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Back on Page One, the idea got floated that celebrity athletes shouldn't count unless they also managed a star turn in some other capacity.

So the fact that Colorado State University still displays the Olympic medal won by Glenn Morris -- who got hailed by Newsweek as "the nation's new iron man" when he set a new world record while just qualifying for the Olympics, and who then had the post-TRIUMPH-OF-THE-WILL camera of Leni Riefenstahl linger on him in OLYMPIA as he set a new new world record while earning Decathlon gold -- that's irrelevant.

But the fact that 20th Century Fox then gave him top billing, trying to recapture the Johnny Weissmuller formula in TARZAN'S REVENGE -- that's relevant.

Right?
  #103  
Old 12-21-2016, 06:20 PM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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At that: college football standout James Pierce graduated from Indiana University before he got top billing in TARZAN AND THE GOLDEN LION.

Now, that wasn't his only star turn; a year earlier, Pierce had been the top-billed actor in THE RETURN OF GREY WOLF as the blinded woodsman getting tons of help from one of those super-capable wonder dogs that folks love to build films around. And, sure, he earned other credits: that was him as Prince Thun of the Lion Men, back in the days when Buster Crabbe was FLASH GORDON; and, likewise, that was him as Frank James, back when Fred Thomson was JESSE JAMES; and so on.

But it's as Tarzan that Pierce was most famous; as per IMDB, he and his wife went on to play Tarzan and Jane in hundreds of radio episodes "that played in every US state, South America and Western Europe".

His tombstone reads, simply:

JAMES HUBERT PIERCE...1900-1983..."TARZAN"

Hers:

JOAN BURROUGHS PIERCE...1908-1972..."JANE"

(Yes, that Burroughs.)
  #104  
Old 12-22-2016, 01:05 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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One more in the same vein: Slingin' Sammy Baugh, who graduated from TCU and then set pro football records that make no damn sense.

Just look at the number of years when he led the league in passer rating (which is a danged high number; it's still the record), and note how many of them were years when he also led the league in punting (also a high number; also still the record); do you see how one of 'em is a year when he also led the league in intercepting the passes thrown by other quarterbacks? Yeah, that's -- well, that's nuts.

Naysayers would maybe figure he severely outclassed players back then, but maybe wouldn't amount to much now; I'll simply add that the single-season yards-per-punt record would be held by Shane Lechler, who recently averaged an amazing 51.14 to beat the count-'em-on-the-fingers-of-one-hand number of other punters who've been on the right side of 50.00 -- with the lone exception of Baugh, at 51.40.

Anyhow, he was top-billed in KING OF THE TEXAS RANGERS, because (a) somebody was bound to star in a movie serial about cowboy gunslingers on horseback foiling Nazi saboteurs, and (b) if the role calls for a sure-footed guy with fast hands, then why the heck wouldn't you just call in the triple-threat king of the gridiron?
  #105  
Old 12-22-2016, 07:57 PM
Arizona Mike Arizona Mike is offline
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David Niven graduated from Sandhurst Military College.

The great character actor Sam Jaffe graduated from City College of New York and studied Engineering at Columbia University graduate school. He later taught mathematics, and became the dean of the Bronx Cultural Institute (a prep school).

Peter Cushing graduated from Shoreham College.

The Other Waldo Pepper, aren't you an OGer?
  #106  
Old 12-23-2016, 09:55 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Heh. I can't tell if that's a compliment or an insult -- or if you're mistaking me for somebody else? (And if that's a compliment or an insult?)

Thing is, I'm just unremarkably answering the OP's question while casually bumping the thread each day so others can readily add posts likewise -- and all that takes is, well, "access to google" plus "an idle moment every 24 hours".

Like, you know how KUKLA, FRAN AND OLLIE was big in the '40s? If you push the button, you see Fran Allison graduated from Coe College -- and anybody could idly google that response, and I happen to qualify; and what's distinctive about that?
  #107  
Old 12-23-2016, 10:06 AM
Arizona Mike Arizona Mike is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Other Waldo Pepper View Post
Heh. I can't tell if that's a compliment or an insult -- or if you're mistaking me for somebody else? (And if that's a compliment or an insult?)

Thing is, I'm just unremarkably answering the OP's question while casually bumping the thread each day so others can readily add posts likewise -- and all that takes is, well, "access to google" plus "an idle moment every 24 hours".

Like, you know how KUKLA, FRAN AND OLLIE was big in the '40s? If you push the button, you see Fran Allison graduated from Coe College -- and anybody could idly google that response, and I happen to qualify; and what's distinctive about that?
No, it wasn't meant as an insult - there's another message board where someone uses a screen name similar to your's and is a big film buff, thought you were him.

Enjoying your posts on this thread.

Last edited by Arizona Mike; 12-23-2016 at 10:07 AM.
  #108  
Old 12-23-2016, 01:27 PM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Oh, hey, no offense taken, then. I mean, I guess it was only ever hypothetical offense, but now it's not even that. Also, that guy sounds awesome.

And since you made mention of Jaffe and some actors from the other side of the Atlantic, I'll add that he did GUNGA DIN with Eduardo Ciannelli -- who apparently not only earned a degree but even practiced medicine for a while before he was the mysterious Doctor Satan in THE MYSTERIOUS DOCTOR SATAN: top-billed as the title character because, hey, full marks for being a superhero who chats with intrepid reporter Lois before catching up to a speeding locomotive where that criminal mastermind is up to no good, but, c'mon: the interesting draw here is Ciannelli.

(He was plenty busy otherwise: third-billed after the guys playing Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin in THE LEAGUE OF FRIGHTENED MEN, and third-billed in DILLINGER, and third-billed in THE GIRL FROM SCOTLAND YARD, and third-billed in BLIND ALIBI, and third-billed in LAW OF THE UNDERWORLD, and so on -- not even counting when he was first-billed in THE CREEPER -- but, c'mon: Doctor Satan!)
  #109  
Old 12-24-2016, 10:58 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Since it's Christmas Eve, this'd be a fine time to mention IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE in general and Princeton grad Jimmy Stewart in particular -- but somebody already mentioned him, so I'll just note that Donna Reed got offers from Hollywood studios while she was in college "but insisted on finishing her education first."

Anyhow, before IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE in '46, Reed had already been top-billed in FAITHFUL IN MY FASHION; and then, after GREEN DOLPHIN STREET in '47, she was second-billed to Alan Ladd in BEYOND GLORY in '48 before getting second-billed to him again in CHICAGO DEADLINE in '49; and so on.

Incidentally: remember the guy who played the key role of Peter Bailey? You know, George Bailey's hardworking dad? That was Samuel Hinds, who'd already (a) worked with Stewart in DESTRY RIDES AGAIN and YOU CAN'T TAKE IT WITH YOU; and who'd already (b) earned a degree from Harvard long before all of that, and before he was Doctor Kildare in all those DOCTOR KILDARE films.

(No, not that Doctor Kildare; he was the other one; the protagonist's dad.)

Hinds also did some Abbott and Costello movies, and some Donald O'Connor movies, and some Bing Crosby movies, and so on; he wasn't really 'star' material, but I figure he arguably hit "Hey, It's That Guy" status at some point -- because whenever they needed a police commissioner, or a coach or a warden or a mayor or an admiral or a senator or a governor, well, then, man, there he was.
  #110  
Old 12-25-2016, 09:50 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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...and, since I just mentioned Bing Crosby, and it's Christmas, it seems like a good time to add that Crosby was pre-law at Gonzaga University in the '20s before getting so big in the '30s that they gave the dropout an honorary degree before he won an Oscar in the '40s and then, y'know, starred in WHITE CHRISTMAS in the '50s.

And if anyone wants to nitpick that that doesn't count, well, (a) I'd argue that he qualifies, given how the OP worded it; but (b) for the sake of completeness, I'll add that one of the movies he starred in during the '40s was WELCOME STRANGER, which was directed by and featured a little acting from Elliott Nugent, OSU Class of '19, who'd been second-billed to leading lady Marion Davies in NOT SO DUMB sure as he'd been second-billed to leading lady Betty Compson in THE VIRTUOUS HUSBAND -- as well as top-billed, in SO THIS IS COLLEGE and WISE GIRLS.

Nugent picked up a writing credit on that last one, there -- just like when he starred in THE MALE ANIMAL on Broadway. (Granted, they swapped in Henry Fonda for the movie version, just like they swapped in Joan Leslie for Gene Tierney; but they hired Nugent to direct, which got him solid name placement on the movie poster. Nugent directed all sorts of movies in the '40s -- a Bob Hope picture, an Alan Ladd picture, a Danny Kaye picture, a Ray Milland picture, you name it -- and wore plenty of hats on Broadway, as actor and writer and director and producer and whatever.)
  #111  
Old 12-26-2016, 09:12 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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At that: one Nugent-directed movie I didn't mention was THE MOUTHPIECE, about a mob lawyer and the woman he falls for -- oh, and the woman who's fallen for him, because Aline MacMahon could totally nail that third-billed role.

In fact, MacMahon -- who was third-billed to Marlene Dietrich and Fred MacMurray in THE LADY IS WILLING, and to William Powell and Kay Francis in ONE WAY PASSAGE, and to Douglas Fairbanks Jr and Loretta Young in THE LIFE OF JIMMY DOLAN -- even racked up an Oscar nomination when she was third-billed to Katharine Hepburn and Walter Huston in DRAGON SEED, when they didn't get nominated for a thing.

MacMahon also pulled off top-billed dramatic roles (in KIND LADY and SIDE STREETS and HEAT LIGHTNING), not to mention how she was top-billed in all those comedies she did alongside Guy Kibbee (THE MERRY FRINKS and BIG HEARTED HERBERT and WHILE THE PATIENT SLEPT), and all after graduating from Barnard College.
  #112  
Old 12-27-2016, 07:02 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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One more film MacMahon was third-billed in: WEEK-END MARRIAGE, with fifth billing going to supporting actor Grant Mitchell -- you know, not the guy in the Cary Grant role, but Reverend Harper in ARSENIC AND OLD LACE; and, obviously, not the guy in Olivia de Havilland's role in A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM, but that's him playing her dad; and that's Paul Muni as Emile Zola in THE LIFE OF EMILE ZOLA, but, sure, put Grant Mitchell in as Georges Clemenceau.

Mitchell was fourth-billed in NEXT TIME WE LOVE -- which was actually pretty solid, as Margaret Sullavan and Jimmy Stewart and Ray Milland were going 1-2-3. Mitchell also got fourth-billed in NO MAN OF HER OWN -- which is also respectable, given that it was Clark Gable and Carole Lombard at the top -- but never mind that now; he managed to get third billing in GRIDIRON FLASH, after the football star and his gal; and he got second-billed to Joan Blondell in THE FAMOUS FERGUSON CASE, as well as to Evelyn Venable in THE HEADLEYS AT HOME.

Oh, and here he is getting top billing in FATHER IS A PRINCE in the 1940s, and here he is getting top billing in MAN TO MAN in the 1930s; heck, he was getting top billing as far back as the 1920s, in one of the first 3-D feature films.

And before that, he graduated from Harvard and started acting on Broadway.
  #113  
Old 12-28-2016, 12:44 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Mitchell also got work as one of the Senators in MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON, with Beulah Bondi playing Jimmy Stewart's mom -- and I maybe should've mentioned her when I was going on about IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE, seeing as how she played Jimmy Stewart's mom in that one; and she was fourth-billed as Jimmy Stewart's mom in VIVACIOUS LADY; and she was third-billed as Jimmy Stewart's mom in the role that got her an Oscar nomination, in OF HUMAN HEARTS.

(That's not all she could do, you understand; after all, she'd already gotten an Oscar nomination before that, stealing scenes in THE GORGEOUS HUSSY. And then she was third-billed in PENNY SERENADE, which got Cary Grant an Oscar nomination; and that was the same year she was third-billed in ONE FOOT IN HEAVEN, which was up for the Oscar for Best Picture; and she was third-billed in a Paulette Goddard picture, and third-billed in a John Wayne picture, and third-billed in a Barbara Stanwyck picture, and third-billed in a Lionel Barrymore picture, you name it.)

(And, yes, Bondi picked up some second-billed roles -- in THE CAPTAIN IS A LADY and MAKE WAY FOR TOMORROW -- and even top billing, in SHE'S A SOLDIER TOO; she got plenty of work on screen after she got plenty of work on Broadway, after she got a bachelor's degree and then a master's degree from Valparaiso University.)
  #114  
Old 12-29-2016, 07:39 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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And moving from Bondi to Bond: sure, IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE had a "Ma Bailey" role like I was just saying -- but it also had "Bert the Cop", as played by Ward Bond.

And that guy got all kinds of work; as per wiki, his role in that one plus his roles in a bunch of other Best Picture nominees is apparently the all-time record:

ARROWSMITH
LADY FOR A DAY
IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT
YOU CAN'T TAKE IT WITH YOU
GONE WITH THE WIND
THE GRAPES OF WRATH
THE LONG VOYAGE HOME
THE MALTESE FALCON
SERGEANT YORK
IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE
THE QUIET MAN
MISTER ROBERTS

And everybody knows his supporting-role schtick, right? TALL IN THE SADDLE was the western starring John Wayne, with his leading lady billed second and Ward Bond in at third; CONFLICT was John Wayne as the bareknuckle boxer, with a second-billed leading lady and Ward Bond at third as "Knockout" Carrigan; OPERATION PACIFIC was Bond getting third-billed as the sub commander, with John Wayne as the top-billed executive officer with a second-billed leading lady; and so on.

Anyhow, he eventually got top billing -- in 1942's HITLER - DEAD OR ALIVE -- but he'd qualify for this thread anyway, right? I mean, you cast a movie star like Errol Flynn as Gentleman Jim Corbett, but you put him up against Ward Bond as John L. Sullivan; or you cast Henry Fonda as Wyatt Earp, and Ward Bond as Morgan Earp; or whatever.

And all after he graduated from the University of Southern California -- where he of course played college football alongside, well, young John Wayne.
  #115  
Old 12-30-2016, 07:11 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Incidentally: that second-billed leading lady in TALL IN THE SADDLE was Ella Raines, who (a) graduated from the University of Washington, and who (b) then went on to get billed second to William Powell in THE SENATOR WAS INDISCREET, and second to Randolph Scott in THE WALKING HILLS, and second to Brian Donlevy in IMPACT, and second to George Raft in A DANGEROUS PROFESSION -- and then it was 1950, when she got top billing in THE SECOND FACE, but that's irrelevant.

What is relevant, though, is what she did in the '40s: billed second to Eddie Bracken in HAIL THE CONQUERING HERO, and later to Charles Laughton in THE SUSPECT, and later to Edmond O'Brien in THE WEB; and she was naturally billed second to the guy playing Arsene Lupin in ENTER ARSENE LUPIN -- just like she was billed second in PHANTOM LADY, and billed second in WHITE TIE AND TAILS -- but even before the deadline, she managed to pull down top billing in THE RUNAROUND.

(She got plenty of other name-on-the-poster work -- in a Burt Lancaster picture, in a George Sanders picture, and so on, and so on -- but that's beside the point.)
  #116  
Old 12-31-2016, 12:13 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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At that, Ms. Raines had a supporting role in TIME OUT OF MIND, as evidenced by how the poster lists her name third, albeit in letters as big as those of the first-billed and second-billed leads; another name on that poster: Helena Carter, who dropped out of grad school after earning an undergraduate degree and got more prominent name placement on the poster for INTRIGUE, when she was third-billed after George Raft and June Havoc in '47; and that's her name again, as big as anybody else's, on the poster for RIVER LADY in '48; and she eventually landed leading-lady status, getting billed second to Douglas Fairbanks Jr in THE FIGHTING O'FLYNN in '49.

Granted, she didn't actually get top billing until the '50s were in full swing -- but I figure she only got that because by then she'd been second-billed to Ray Milland in one movie and to Donald O'Connor in another and to George Montgomery in another, and I figure she only got those roles because she'd proven she could handle second billing in the '40s -- and so I figure second billing qualifies her for this thread.
  #117  
Old 01-01-2017, 07:46 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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And, just to keep it going: a credit that wasn't worth mentioning for Helena Carter was her third-billed role in THE GOLDEN HAWK, which also featured a spot of acting from Paul Cavanagh -- who (a) had picked up a master's degree before getting billed second to Mae West in GOIN' TO TOWN, and who (b) spent the rest of the '30s getting billed second to his leading lady du jour in STRICTLY UNCONVENTIONAL and MENACE and WITHOUT REGRET and CRIME OVER LONDON and THE NOTORIOUS SOPHIE LANG and TRANSGRESSION -- and even getting top-billed roles, in DANGER IN PARIS and CHAMPAGNE CHARLIE and A ROMANCE IN FLANDERS.

(I don't mean to imply that Cavanagh fell off the map in the '40s; I mean, sure, he was third-billed to Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce in THE SCARLET CLAW, but that's just the way it goes when those two are Holmes and Watson, y'know? And after that, Cavanagh could still field a second-billed-to-his-leading-lady role -- as was the case in WIFE WANTED, that 1946 picture he did with Kay Francis. And so on.)
  #118  
Old 01-02-2017, 06:39 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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In addition to giving Paul Cavanagh a top-billed role, DANGER IN PARIS was a chance for Bruce Seton to show what he could do in the fourth-billed one -- sure as Seton was third-billed in FATHER STEPS OUT and ANNIE LAURIE, sure as he was second-billed in MIRACLES DO HAPPEN and THE VANDERGILT DIAMOND MYSTERY, sure as he got top billing in IF I WERE BOSS and RACING ROMANCE.

That was the '30s, see, when a former British Army officer who'd graduated from the Royal Military College at Sandhurst was free to do stuff like that -- and, sure as he boxed in the service, there was no reason not to give a guy like that top billing in a comedy like FIFTY-SHILLING BOXER.

Of course, in the '40s there was something of a war on -- which was a terrific reason why Captain Seton suddenly wasn't free to make movies for a while. But, sure as he eventually became Major Seton, the war eventually ended -- and in '46, he was right back on the big screen, getting second-billed as Spring-Heeled Jack.

(After that came the '50s, when he was FABIAN OF THE YARD on television and in the movies; and after that came the '60s, when he became Major Sir Bruce Lovat Seton of Abercorn, 11th Baronet; but that's irrelevant, if interesting. Also irrelevant, but also interesting: he apparently holds Scotland's all-time record for the shortest number of minutes between getting divorced from one spouse and marrying another.)
  #119  
Old 01-02-2017, 09:45 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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The Other Waldo Pepper writes:

> . . . who'd graduated from the Royal Military College at Sandhurst . . .

It does not award bachelor's degrees. It is not like, for instance, one of the American service academies. It's more like an officers candidate school, which offers training of less than a year for people who have already graduated from college. But even that isn't quite correct. While it is true that about 80% of the people who go to Sandhurst already have bachelor's degrees, about 20% don't, so graduating from Sandhurst is not an indication of having a college degree.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_...demy_Sandhurst

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Officer_Candidate_School
  #120  
Old 01-03-2017, 12:34 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Much obliged for the information; I guess I'd be well-advised to steer clear of Brits should this thread continue -- because, hey, if they're going to call it a college, then what the hell else is up that sleeve? Will I breezily note that Sir So-And-So earned a PhD, only to have you gently enquire whether I realize that, at that institution, "earned a PhD" is a polite Britishism for "worked there as a groundskeeper"?

All kidding aside: with that lesson learned, I'll now just talk up Peter Gunn himself, America's own Craig Stevens: a guy who did receive a for-real no-foolin' bachelor's degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City back in 1936, and who'd take a supporting role in an Errol Flynn movie or a Ronald Reagan movie and so on -- and who picked up prominent third billing in STEEL AGAINST THE SKY before he got top billing in THE HIDDEN HAND and SPY SHIP and SECRET ENEMIES.

(U-S-A! U-S-A! U-S-A!)
  #121  
Old 01-04-2017, 06:29 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Robert Beatty earned a BA from the University of Toronto before getting top billing as Gulliver in Another Shore. (No, not that Gulliver.)

Anyhow, he otherwise spent the '40s getting top billing in Against The Wind, with second billing going to his leading lady Simone Signoret; and getting second-billed to leading lady Mai Zetterling, in The Girl In The Painting; and getting top billing in Counterblast, as the lab assistant who may not realize in time that the guy he works for is a Nazi agent secretly developing a biological weapon; and getting top billing in It Happened One Sunday, doing the whole romantic-comedy thing; and getting top billing in Green Fingers, as the working-class man who discovers he has an incredible knack for healing; and so on, and so on.
  #122  
Old 01-05-2017, 10:23 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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John "Dusty" King graduated from the University of Cincinnati, and after picking up minor roles in a few movies got top-billed as the title character in ACE DRUMMOND in '36; and top-billed in THE ROAD BACK, in '37; and top-billed in STATE POLICE, in '38; and after he was Aramis to Don Ameche's D'Artagnan in THE THREE MUSKETEERS in '39, was back to top billing in MIDNIGHT LIMITED in '40; and then he was top-billed and second-billed in a whole bunch of westerns.
  #123  
Old 01-06-2017, 06:02 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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David Bruce graduated from Northwestern University and started getting small roles in all sorts of films -- a John Wayne movie, a Gary Cooper movie, Errol Flynn movies, Edward G. Robinson movies, and so on -- as well as getting second billed to leading lady Anne Gwynne in SOUTH OF DIXIE and MOON OVER LAS VEGAS, as well as getting second billed in the love-triangle comedy SHE'S FOR ME, as well as second billed in the love-triangle drama SINGAPORE WOMAN; and while he picked up third billing in ALLERGIC TO LOVE and RACING LUCK and SALOME WHERE SHE DANCED, he was top billed in SUSIE STEPS OUT and HONEYMOON LODGE and THE MAD GHOUL.

Anyhow, right after Bruce got top billing in 1949's PREJUDICE, he was top billed as Daniel Boone in 1950; he kept getting third-billed and second-billed work in the '50s, in PYGMY ISLAND and THE ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN KIDD, along with top-billed work in TIMBER FURY -- but that'd take us beyond the scope of the thread.
  #124  
Old 01-07-2017, 06:16 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Tris Coffin earned a BA from the University of Washington and got lots of work in the '30s and '40s -- a Dick Tracy movie, a Charlie Chan movie, this or that film noir, the SPY SMASHER serial, and so on -- and various fourth-billed parts, in westerns where the top three spots go to the hero and his sidekick and the pretty gal.

Anyhow, he fielded the third-billed role in THE CORPSE VANISHES, with Bela Lugosi; and was third-billed in DESERT VIGILANTE, with Charles Starrett; and third-billed in RANGE JUSTICE, with Johnny Mack Brown; and I figure enough of that adds up to a solid claim to "hey, it's that guy" status. But if I'm wrong about that, if he's going to need a top-billed role to qualify for this thread, then let me add that he finally graduated to that in 1949, as KING OF THE ROCKET MEN.
  #125  
Old 01-08-2017, 09:16 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Katherine Dunham earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Chicago in 1936 before touring America and the world with her own dance company, authoring a book along the way while performing on Broadway and in a variety of movies -- CASBAH, STORMY WEATHER, STAR SPANGLED RHYTHM -- all before 1949.

(She was still at it in 1950 -- the year she appeared on THE ED SULLIVAN SHOW; and was back on Broadway a 7th time, with Katherine Dunham And Her Company; and was back up on the big screen, dancing in I'M IN THE REVUE; and so on -- but, again, the point is how much high-profile stuff she did before that, which was plenty.)

Last edited by The Other Waldo Pepper; 01-08-2017 at 09:17 AM.
  #126  
Old 01-09-2017, 06:20 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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"A Syracuse University graduate who passed the bar examinations in New York," William Lundigan decided to try his chances in film; he made his screen debut in 1937, getting third-billed after the leading man and leading lady -- and then getting second-billed, as the leading man to a leading lady -- and then third-billed and second-billed again in 1938 -- but then in 1939, when he wasn't plugging away in a movie with Bette Davis or Errol Flynn, he went from second billing to top billing.

Lundigan then spent the 1940s in pretty much the same vein; he'd take a supporting role in a Ronald Reagan movie or a film with Lloyd Nolan and Donna Reed -- though you can see from the posters that he got billed prominently -- when he wasn't busy in a top-billed role, in A SHOT IN THE DARK, or THE CASE OF THE BLACK PARROT, or MYSTERY IN MEXICO, or FOLLOW ME QUIETLY, or whatever. (Again, he'd still take a supporting role in a Hedy Lamar movie or a Jimmy Cagney movie; it's just that he'd then get top-billed in SAILORS ON LEAVE or HEADIN' FOR GOD'S COUNTRY. And, sure, he was second-billed to his leading lady in THE INSIDE STORY; but he was top-billed, over leading lady Virginia Bruce, in STATE DEPARTMENT: FILE 649. And so on.)
  #127  
Old 01-10-2017, 06:33 AM
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Edgar Buchanan earned a DDS, and actually practiced dentistry for a while, before making his way to Hollywood; he wasn't classic leading-man material -- he wasn't the guy they'd cast as Robin Hood, but he was the guy they cast as Friar Tuck -- but he didn't need to be, to get plenty of work.

I mean, like I was just saying, they'd of course cast Richard Dix and Kent Taylor as Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday in TOMBSTONE; but they'd put Buchanan in at third, as Curly Bill Brocious. Or third in ABILENE TOWN, after Randolph Scott and Ann Dvorak; or third in YOU BELONG TO ME, after Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda; or third in ADVENTURES IN SILVERADO and THE WALLS CAME TUMBLING DOWN and so on; and fourth-billing in a Cary Grant flick like PENNY SERENADE or an Edward G. Robinson flick like DESTROYER or a Glenn Ford flick like FRAMED didn't hurt...

...but let me switch gears to add that he was second billed in CITY WITHOUT MEN and THE RICHEST MAN IN TOWN and THE WRECK OF THE HESPERUS before he eventually got top billing as the star of BEST MAN WINS in 1948.
  #128  
Old 01-11-2017, 06:12 AM
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Wiki sez that Don McNeill's 35-year run as the host of his variety show is the longest tenure ever for an emcee of a network entertainment program, narrowly beating out Johnny Carson and Bob Barker; his radio show got its start in the 1930s, and kept on running in the 1940s when people could also see him doing it on television thanks to a simulcast on DuMont -- and the whole enterprise was still going strong in 1950, when he parlayed his fame into doing Don McNeill's TV Club on ABC at 9pm on Wednesday nights, sure as the radio show kept going on well into the 1960s.

Wiki also sez that he was a Marquette University grad.
  #129  
Old 01-12-2017, 07:39 AM
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Rex Ingram presumably counts.

I mean, he obviously qualifies in that he was, AFAICT, the first African-American man to receive a Phi Beta Kappa key from Northwestern University; I'm just asking if the guy reached full 'celebrity' status with his acting career.

And I think he did -- because, even leaving aside all of his credits on Broadway in the '30s and '40s, movie audiences saw Ingram do plenty of memorable work in lots of high-profile stuff. Like, that was him as the genie in Thief of Bagdad; and that was him as, uh, Jim in the Mickey Rooney version of Huckleberry Finn; and that was him getting top-billed in Green Pastures, which AFAICT remained the highest-grossing film with an all-black cast for eighteen years; and so on.

(And, at that, he took his Broadway role in Cabin In The Sky to the big screen -- still playing Lucifer, but now with prominent billing on the poster that excitedly exclaims: "At Last On The Screen! The Musical Comedy Sensation!") (Heck, his name is a good deal bigger there than Vincente Minnelli's is for, y'know, directing the thing.)
  #130  
Old 01-13-2017, 05:58 AM
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Allen Funt got a Cornell degree before he started hosting Candid Microphone on radio, and then parlayed that into some theatrical short films in the same vein, and then of course started hosting Candid Camera on television in the late 1940s.
  #131  
Old 01-14-2017, 12:10 AM
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Phillips Lord graduated with honors from Bowdoin College, and then starred in his own national radio show with an audience of millions -- which is respectable enough in its own right, but which also helps explain why he was able to parlay his signature character from it into a top-billed movie role (complete with young Bette Davis in a supporting role) easy as cranking out book after book after book -- you know, when the guy wasn't putting out plenty of records with the Phillips Lord Trio.
  #132  
Old 01-15-2017, 09:01 AM
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Speaking of books, I guess a bunch of writers would fit the OP's terms; once you hit a certain level of name recognition, 'celebrity status' seems like the right phrase.

Like, take Arthur Miller: he was famous in the '50s, as the guy with Marilyn Monroe on his arm and a Tony for The Crucible -- but maybe he was already famous in the '40s, as the college grad who'd won a Tony for Death Of A Salesman.

At that, by '49 Sinclair Lewis had already picked up a Yale degree and a Nobel Prize, and adapted his It Can't Happen Here into a Broadway play, and Arrowsmith had gotten an Oscar nomination (with his name touted on the poster).

Likewise, how else were they going to shill the Oscar-nominated film of Our Town other than by putting Thornton Wilder's name out there? So that's another Yale grad, who also did prominent stuff on Broadway; or how about another Nobel Prize winner: prominent poet and playwright T. S. Eliot, who'd of course graduated from Harvard before heading to Oxford?

Which -- you know, I'd been hesitant to mention Brits due to, uh, impenetrability; but, hey, maybe I should be hesitant to mention writers, so I'll use Oxford as the jumping-off point to offset one another by putting an actor amidst the authors: Donald Crisp. "The first Oxford graduate to make it in Hollywood was Donald Crisp," says Oxford itself, apparently; and who, before winning an Academy Award for his acting in How Green Was My Valley, was pretty much all over the place: playing Ulysses S Grant in Birth Of A Nation, and then getting top-billed as Leif Ericsson in The Viking, and directing a Douglas Fairbanks picture in between; and, granted, since the roles of Elizabeth and Essex were going to Bette Davis and Errol Flynn in The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex, he came in at fourth as Francis Bacon behind Olivia de Havilland; and fourth, after Spencer Tracy and Ingrid Bergman and Lana Turner, in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; and fourth in a Katharine Hepburn movie, and fourth in a Jimmy Cagney movie; and so on, and so on.

Anyhow, if he for some reason doesn't count, I'll gladly mention more writers who earned college degrees and became household names, from Tennessee Williams to Thomas Wolfe -- but if they don't count, I figure Crisp does.
  #133  
Old 01-15-2017, 11:17 PM
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Marvin Miller -- who in the '50s was the voice of Robbie The Robot on the big screen while he was handing out big checks on The Millionaire on the small screen -- was a Washington University graduate who got a ton of radio work in the '40s, which along with roles in this or that movie helps explain why he was picked to be the star of the Mysteries of Chinatown TV show on ABC starting back in 1949.
  #134  
Old 01-17-2017, 06:21 AM
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Barry Nelson was the first James Bond -- you know, squaring off against Peter Lorre as Le Chiffre, in the live-television version of CASINO ROYALE in the '54.

Anyway, before that he was MY FAVORITE HUSBAND on television starting in '53; and before that, he was the star of THE HUNTER on television in '52; and before that, he was in theaters as the star of THE MAN WITH MY FACE in '51; and before that, he'd picked up a dozen golden-age-of-television credits in '50; but before that, it was the '40s and Nelson was in theaters as the second-billed leading man to Ann Sothern in UNDERCOVER MAISIE; and he'd been in theaters as the second-billed leading man to Laraine Day in A YANK ON THE BURMA ROAD; and he'd also been third-billed, after William Powell and Myrna Loy, in SHADOW OF THE THIN MAN; and so on, and so on, picking up screen credits in BATAAN and A GUY NAMED JOE and everything else from Abbott and Costello to Doctor Kildare.

Anyhow, before all of that he graduated from UC Berkeley.
  #135  
Old 01-18-2017, 06:27 AM
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After graduating from the University of Arizona, Mark Roberts headed to Hollywood and started picking up roles under his "Robert Scott" stage name: that's his name, as big as anyone else's, on the poster for SHADOWED, where he was fourth-billed; and he was fourth-billed in THE CRIME DOCTOR'S COURAGE and THE UNKNOWN, likewise; and third-billed in TEN CENTS A DANCE, and PRAIRIE RAIDERS, and SHED NO TEARS, likewise; and second-billed to leading lady Adele Mara, in EXPOSED; and top-billed, over leading lady Adele Jergens, in BLACK ARROW.
  #136  
Old 01-19-2017, 06:09 AM
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I think Gladys Swarthout counts -- IMDB says she got a Doctorate of Music before she was top-billed over Fred MacMurray in Champagne Waltz in 1937, and over John Boles in Romance in the Dark in 1938, and over Lloyd Nolan in Ambush in 1939, and so on, and so on -- but that may have been an honorary degree, and so I'll focus instead on somebody else from the Ambush cast.

No, not Harvard dropout Broderick Crawford; Richard Denning, who (a) got an MBA easy as starring in Golden Gloves in 1940, and who (b) got all sorts of work before 1950 -- getting billed second to Dorothy Lamour in Beyond the Blue Horizon, and to Ellen Drew in Ice-Capades Review, and to young Mona Freeman in Black Beauty; and getting top-billed, in Seven Were Saved and Caged Fury and Lady At Midnight.
  #137  
Old 01-20-2017, 05:08 AM
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If you google the phrase "the world's greatest living radio actress", you'll see that it was an accolade bestowed by Orson Welles on Mercedes McCambridge, who won a Golden Globe and an Academy Award for her role in 1949's All The King's Men after performing on Broadway after graduating with honors from Mundelein College.
  #138  
Old 01-21-2017, 06:59 AM
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"She was born Mabel Linton in Otttumwa, Iowa, and moved with her foster family to California in her teens. After graduating from UCLA, she gained some acting experience at the Pasadena Community Playhouse. She broke into movies in 1930, when asked to read lines to actors being tested for the Garbo movie, Inspiration. She was cast, and signed up by MGM as Karen Morley."

And as Karen Morley, she spent the rest of the '30s -- well, getting billed third after Boris Karloff and Lewis Stone in The Mask Of Fu Manchu; and getting billed third in Paul Muni's star turn as Scarface, but getting billed second to him in Black Fury; and she was second-billed to Richard Dix in Devil's Squadron, just like she'd get billed second to him again in The Thirteenth Hour in the '40s; and she was billed second to Lionel Barrymore, in The Washington Masquerade, sure as she was billed second to Walter Huston in Gabriel Over The White House; and she was billed second to Edmund Lowe, and second to Warren William, and you get the idea.

Anyhow, she even fielded top-billed work -- in Our Daily Bread and The Unknown and The Girl From Scotland Yard -- before she refused to answer various questions put to her by the House Un-American Activities Committee; after that, she was no longer getting top billing. Or second billing. Or third billing.
  #139  
Old 01-22-2017, 08:26 AM
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In April of 1950, Myron McCormick won a Tony Award for his role in South Pacific, which he'd of course been playing in 1949, and maybe that counts, but maybe it doesn't; but that's maybe just icing on the cake, since 1949 was also when he got prominent billing on the big screen in Jigsaw, after years and years playing other movie roles -- including a top-billed one, in The Fight For Life -- along with years and years playing other roles on Broadway, all after graduating from Princeton.

But that strikes me as burying the lead, because -- well, look, Souh Pacific, that was a Rodgers and Hammerstein thing, wasn't it? Just like Annie Get Your Gun before it, and Carousel before that, and Oklahoma! before that?

And didn't the posters carefully showcase the film they got an Academy Award for as RODGERS and HAMMERSTEIN'S STATE FAIR in TECHNICOLOR, back in 1945?

Anyhow, they both went to Columbia: Rodgers left to study at what's now Julliard, which now has a Richard Rodgers Director of the Drama Division; but Hammerstein stuck around, earning a bachelor's degree there before heading to law school.
  #140  
Old 01-23-2017, 05:51 AM
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After graduating from USC, Betty Miles obviously wasn't going to receive top billing in The Return of Daniel Boone -- but they needed a second-billed leading lady, and she was it; and then, for strikingly similar reasons, she was the second-billed leading lady to Tom Keene in The Driftin' Kid and then playing the second-billed leading lady to him again in Riding The Sunset Trail; and a quick look at IMDB of course shows her name plastered on the movie posters for various other westerns.
  #141  
Old 01-24-2017, 06:15 AM
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Mark Harmon was a star college football player before he starred in a few movies and now pulls down a little over half a million dollars per episode on television.

All of which is irrelevant, of course.

But his dad, Tom Harmon, had won the Heisman Trophy on the strength of being the top scorer in back-to-back years, and in 1941 was a big enough draw that he got top billing in HARMON OF MICHIGAN; also, "Harmon was selected by the Chicago Bears with the first selection in the first round of the 1941 NFL Draft. However, Harmon declined to sign with the Bears, initially stating that he was through playing football and instead planned to pursue a career in radio and the movies."

Of course, since it was '41 that wasn't to be; Harmon instead spent years serving in WWII. And after that, he spent the rest of the '40s (a) playing professional football, (b) appearing in films with his wife, and (c) parlaying his celebrity status into work as a sports broadcaster -- to the point where, in "the late 1940s, he was the play-by-play announcer for NBC on the first television broadcast of a Rose Bowl game."
  #142  
Old 01-25-2017, 07:22 AM
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Donald Cook graduated from the University of Oregon before he was Jimmy Cagney's straight-arrow brother in THE PUBLIC ENEMY. ("Yer hands ain't so clean. Ya killed, and liked it. Ya didn't get them medals fer holdin' hands wit' them Germans.")

Sure, that was a supporting role, but it was a big one; he got noticed, and followed it up by getting second-billed to his leading lady in SAFE IN HELL and second-billed again in THE TRIAL OF VIVIENNE WARE, and again in THE CIRCUS QUEEN MURDER, and yet again in JENNIE GERHARDT -- and then he started getting top billing in various mystery movies, in THE NINTH GUEST and MOTIVE FOR REVENGE and CONFIDENTIAL and so on; heck, he was top-billed as Ellery Queen in THE SPANISH CAPE MYSTERY.

Plenty of other top-billed roles, too -- FURY IN THE JUNGLE and BEWARE OF LADIES and BLONDE RANSOM -- and all before 1949.
  #143  
Old 01-26-2017, 11:34 AM
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Wiki says that Steve Cochran "graduated from the University of Wyoming in 1939" before he got work on Broadway and started fielding brink-of-stardom roles in the 1940s: he was third-billed to Robert Cummings and Michele Morgan, in THE CHASE; and he was third-billed to Chester Morris and Nina Foch in a BOSTON BLACKIE flick; and he was third-billed to Groucho Marx and Carmen Miranda in COPACABANA; and picking up that status in the 1940s is presumably why he got his first top-billed role when 1950 rolled around.

But what Wiki giveth, IMDB taketh away -- or, at least, calls into question -- by stating that, no, he actually dropped out of college "to give Hollywood a go."

So I'll instead mention that Cochrane was in THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES, as was Hoagy Carmichael, who more conclusively stuck around long enough to earn himself a degree from Indiana University before -- well, yes, passing the bar exam, but that's not what made him famous; Heart And Soul and The Nearness Of You and Stardust and Georgia On My Mind, *that* got his name out there before he picked up his first Oscar nomination before the '40s were out.

(Same way he hosted THE HOAGY CARMICHAEL SHOW, broadcast as it was by CBS from '46 to '48. And like I'd said, he did a little acting, too: fifth-billed in Bogie and Bacall's TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT; and fourth-billed, after Dana Andrews and Merle Oberon, in NIGHT SONG; heck, he even managed to get third-billed before the '40s were out; but, again, that wasn't *really* his claim to fame, y'know?)
  #144  
Old 01-27-2017, 06:06 AM
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In the '50s, Robert Rockwell headlined his own TV show after Eve Arden won an Emmy for pursuing him in season after season of OUR MISS BROOKS; but before that, in the '40s, he was just a guy who'd picked up a master's degree and top billing in a couple of films (THE RED MENACE and ALIAS THE CHAMP), explaining why he got top billing in a couple more (UNMASKED and TRIAL BY JURY) in 1950 before he moved on to all of that TV work I was just talking about. (And, of course, OUR MISS BROOKS was so huge on television that the movie version hit theaters in '56 -- with Rockwell's character finally proposing to Arden's up there on the big screen.)
  #145  
Old 01-28-2017, 06:32 AM
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Barbara O'Neil graduated from Sarah Lawrence and then got all sorts of work in the '30s: after making her screen debut with STELLA DALLAS, she was billed third after Douglas Fairbanks Jr and Basil Rathbone in THE SUN NEVER SETS; and third again, after Rathbone and Boris Karloff, in TOWER OF LONDON; and third yet again, after Irene Dunne and Charles Boyer, in WHEN TOMORROW COMES; and even picking up second billing, as Edward G Robinson's leading lady in I AM THE LAW.

Anyhow, after playing Scarlett O'Hara's mom in GONE WITH THE WIND she earned an Oscar nomination for her role in 1940's ALL THIS, AND HEAVEN TOO; and after that, O'Neil -- well, yes, was still picking up name-on-the-poster work in Hollywood, sure, just like she did back when; but she was also busy on Broadway, acting with young Gregory Peck and younger Montgomery Clift and so on before 1950.
  #146  
Old 01-29-2017, 07:12 AM
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And, speaking of Oscar nominees who acted both on Broadway and with Vivien Leigh, University of Western Ontario grad Alexander Knox acted in a Broadway production with Leigh -- she was Juliet, Olivier was Romeo; Knox, Friar Laurence -- before he got top billing and an Oscar nomination playing Woodrow Wilson in WILSON, which in turn got an Oscar nomination for Best Picture.

Anyhow, WILSON came out in '44, and he followed that up by getting billed second to leading lady Irene Dunne in OVER 21 in '45, and then got billed second to leading lady Rosalind Russell in SISTER KENNY in '46 -- and after returning to top-billed work in '47 with THE JUDGE STEPS OUT, in '48 he promptly got billed second to Susan Peters in THE SIGN OF THE RAM before getting billed second to Bogie in TOKYO JOE in '49.

Oh, and he was second-billed in NONE SHALL ESCAPE: one of those movies about a Nazi on trial for war crimes, sure -- but one that came out during WWII, which made it a little more noteworthy. (He didn't get an Oscar nomination for that one, but the screenplay did, because it was a downright interesting film.)
  #147  
Old 01-29-2017, 11:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
AK84 writes:

> . . . It means that he got the highest possible grades . . .

Sort of, but be aware of the difference between American and British ways of evaluating university students. British universities don't give grades in individual courses. Students take overall examinations in their chosen subject (i.e., their major) at the end of their university career. Their honors degree is determined by the results of that test. About 15% of university students get a first-class honors degree. A standard way of explaining the equivalence between British and American universities is that a first-class honors at a British university is equivalent to getting at least a 3.67 GPA at an American university:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Britis...-class_honours
Students in my department are assessed by two written assignments for their autumn modules, and a written assessment + exam in their spring modules -- the 'single exam at the end of university model' is long out of date. I'm not sure when my university dropped it, but it was at least a generation ago if not more.

Students do indeed get marks on their individual assignments and marks for their modules, ranging from first (equiv of an A) to fail.

Anyway, apologies for continuing the diversion; carry on.
  #148  
Old 01-29-2017, 12:30 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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It appears that some British universities still use a single test at the end of the last year to give students their overall assessment for their time at university. Look at this Wikipedia article. It says that at Oxford and Cambridge each student is given an assessment at the end of their time at university that tells anyone who asks how well they did, by saying that they got a 1, a 2.1, a 2.2, or a 3 degree (for Oxford) and a I, a II.I, a II.II, or a III degree (for Cambridge. Note that the article says that the class of the degree is determined strictly by the final exam at the end of university, even though there may be some earlier tests:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Britis...classification

What university do you teach at?

In October last year, I had a long conversation with an Oxford graduate about the differences between American universities and British universities (and this conversation was while we were walking through the Oxford campus). She was astonished at some of the differences that I mentioned. She said that a professor doesn't evaluate his own students. It's done by someone else (or several other people) in the department. In American universities professors give grades for a single course strictly based on their own tests, etc. in their own courses. She was astonished by the notion that, if a student was having psychological problems, a decision that he should leave the university, at least for a while, wasn't done by the student's department or by his tutor. At an American university, there is almost always a counseling office with psychologists who will speak in confidence with students. Any decision that the student has problems which would cause them to leave the university temporarily or permanently would derive strictly from the counselor's decision and can't be discussed with anyone other than the student, including any professors the students has studied under.

Now it's possible that this woman didn't know much about how Oxford or British universities now work. She graduated quite a while ago. If what I just said is wrong, please inform me as to how British universities now work.

Last edited by Wendell Wagner; 01-29-2017 at 12:31 PM.
  #149  
Old 01-30-2017, 06:12 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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On a tangent, a piece of trivia I found while idly googling the stars of yesteryear is how Philadelphia's Central High School is "the only high school in the United States that has the authority, granted by an Act of Assembly in 1849, to confer academic degrees upon its graduates. This practice is still in effect, and graduates who meet the requirements are granted the Bachelor of Arts degree."

I hadn't yet mentioned that, because -- well, yes, you could argue that Rudy Bond qualified for this thread after he got just such a BA from Central High, as folks could then see him on Broadway in '47 and '48 and '49 with Marlon Brando and Karl Malden in that award-winning production of A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE, which is why they all fielded their respective roles in the movie version in '51.

But I'm not sure that's famous enough.

Anyhow, somebody else who acted in a production with Karl Malden in the '40s was Coleen Gray, who got a prominent "and introducing" credit right there on the poster for KISS OF DEATH; she was third-billed in that one, and after she was third-billed in a Tyrone Power movie promptly went on to get billed second as Victor Mature's leading lady in FURY AT FURNACE CREEK in '48 before she was billed second to Mark Stevens in SAND in '49; she was then second-billed to William Holden in one 1950 picture, and second-billed to Bing Crosby in another, but that's irrelevant.

What is relevant, though, is that before all of that she earned a BA from Hamline.
  #150  
Old 01-31-2017, 05:52 AM
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Tex McCrary was a Yale grad who, in the 1940s, hosted a radio show with his wife, actress Jinx Falkenburg, which soon got them hosting Bristol-Myers Tele-Varieties, also known as Jinx And Tex At Home, on Sundays on NBC in '47. (Aside from that TV work, they were of course also still on the radio in '47, doing Meet Tex And Jinx as a summer replacement for the crazy popular Duffy's Tavern -- which they did again in '48, before they started hosting the TV show Preview in '49.)
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