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  #1  
Old 02-04-2017, 12:48 PM
Projammer Projammer is offline
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Things script writers get wrong every time.

Television or movies. What are the plot elements that everyone knows will end badly? Or that just can't happen in real life because they're illegal?

I'll grab a few of the low hanging fruit to get us rolling.

Stupid:
Police/federal agents/investigators/whoever see the person they want to talk to on the other side of the parking lot and then yell out his name before attempting to get any closer. They're always surprised when the person takes off running.

Impossible:
Enhance that grainy low-light out of focus surveillance video to make out the tattoo on the suspects neck.

Illegal:
Discover that the person they're looking for has a rare disease or has to take some unusual drug. No worries! I can research that on the master database. Umm. No. You can't because HIPAA is a thing so massive fines and criminal prosecution are likely outcomes. (Saw this one last night on NCIS)


There are scores more of course, so I'll stop here and come back later.

ETA: Grmph. Script WRITERS. Can I get a passing mod to edit that please?

Last edited by Projammer; 02-04-2017 at 12:50 PM..
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  #2  
Old 02-04-2017, 01:16 PM
Joey P Joey P is online now
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Regarding HIPAA, people covered by HIPAA can release PHI to police when it that information will help them apprehend someone that's a threat to the public or has escaped custody. I don't watch NCIS so I don't know the case, but I could see a situation where they know the person they're looking for was, as you said, taking a drug not many people are on or has a reportable disease (things like (diagnosed) food poisoning aren't nearly as common as you'd think), so it would be easy for the police to approach medical staff explain the situation and come up with a small list, probably smaller if they have a description and locate the person much faster than blindly searching the city.

https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/45/164.512


Regarding the running thing, in one episodes, when it happened, the main character said 'why do they always run, don't they realize it makes them look guilty when they run'.
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Old 02-04-2017, 02:30 PM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is offline
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Patient has AB+ blood. Patient needs a transfusion. The hunt is on for a donor with AB+ blood. No other type will be suitable. And AB+ blood is so super-rare that it's almost impossible to find a donor.

(In real life, AB+ is called the universal recipient. It can receive blood from A, B, AB or O, and either rhesus positive or negative. And AB+ blood isn't as rare as all that anyway.)
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Old 02-04-2017, 04:13 PM
Projammer Projammer is offline
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re: HIPAA

I'll pretend I'm a script writer for a moment.

The suspect cut him/herself at the scene and left a sizeable blood sample. No DNA match as that would be too simple. However tests found traces of busparinacyl (a fictitious but familiar sounding prescription only drug). Our intrepid investigators then use that info to search some pharmaceutical database to find out everyone who has a prescription for it in their metro area which of course ultimately leads to the villain.

The first time that an agency tried that there's a whole alphabet soup of agencies that are going to come down on them like a ton of bricks.
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Old 02-04-2017, 07:01 PM
ftg ftg is offline
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A computer searching for a password one letter at a time. And each letter takes the same amount of time. (War Games, for example.)*

Something is being decrypted on the screen and individual characters are decoded in random places until they all are. (Sleepers, for example.)

Not sure if all of these can be blamed on the writer. Flunkies in production might cause many of them.

* This used to happen a lot in real life due to crappy programs. Very rare now but there have been web login exploits that use this. Of course the "ultra-secure password" systems in these movies don't fall into this category.
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Old 02-04-2017, 07:23 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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Originally Posted by ftg View Post
A computer searching for a password one letter at a time. And each letter takes the same amount of time. (War Games, for example.) . . .
This was done right in Terminator 2 (I think?) Young John Connor is breaking a four-digit PIN, and the time per digit decreased; the first digit took some minutes, but the fourth digit snapped past almost instantly.

(Okay, it still wouldn't work that way: a real ATM only allows a very small number of attempts before locking down. But, hey, it was a small nod toward a kind of numerical accuracy!)

One little detail scripts get wrong a lot: reporters and journalists never take the extra moment to ask for the spelling of names. In real life, they must take that effort. Johnson? Johnston? Johnstone? Having it on a little hand-held voice recorder won't cut the mustard!
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Old 02-04-2017, 07:44 PM
Aspenglow Aspenglow is offline
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A couple minor niggles that I'm sure someone will be along to tell me is true in only my experience in the legal world, but not anywhere else...

1. At trial, there is no such thing as an opening argument. There is an opening statement, and a closing argument -- but not an opening argument.

2. When script writers don't distinguish between a jail and a prison, or for what purpose each is used.
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Old 02-04-2017, 09:19 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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I have always been poor at math, but even I know that if a guy left town ten years ago and returns to discover his ex has a ten-year-old child it shouldn't be a shock to him considering that kid would've already been born when he left. It's simple math, script writers: X years minus 10 months = surprise kid's age. Round up to a full year to make it easier, even.
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Old 02-04-2017, 10:10 PM
turner turner is offline
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Missileers havent carried guns on alert for about over 30 years
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Old 02-04-2017, 10:18 PM
digs digs is offline
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Missileers havent carried guns on alert for about over 30 years
Translation? Never come across the term "Missileer" and don't know what "guns on alert" are...
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  #11  
Old 02-04-2017, 10:41 PM
Ethilrist Ethilrist is offline
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The speed at which test results come back from the lab. Genetic tests can take months.

The speed at which people respond to new anti-depressant drugs. "We just switched her to this new drug, and she should be better in a few hours." Um, no, it can take days or weeks for most drugs to build up a head of steam in the system and make any noticeable effect.
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Old 02-04-2017, 10:57 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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Every reprobate, no matter how down and out they are, has perfect Hollywood teeth. Even immigrants, from countries where dentistry is virtually unknown.
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Old 02-04-2017, 11:25 PM
digs digs is offline
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Every reprobate, no matter how down and out they are, has perfect Hollywood teeth. Even immigrants, from countries where dentistry is virtually unknown.
Back in the 70s, I'd laugh at all the historical characters with perfectly coiffed hair.

Trendy-haired actors refusing to cut their hair for a military role (Helloooo, Hawkeye and B.J. Hunnicut...) was even a thread here, from the early 00's.

I think the perfect, overly-whitened teeth are just as jarring. But can we blame that one on the writers? Couldn't that be taken care of with a few minutes in the makeup chair, painting an actor's teeth?
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  #14  
Old 02-04-2017, 11:28 PM
Miss Woodhouse Miss Woodhouse is offline
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In a police procedural or mystery there is always some element that narrows things down in the most unrealistic way. The tests reveal that the murder took place in a building with a super rare form of insulation (just ran across this one on an old episode of Bones. You know what, my cite is every single flipping episode of Bones) or the murderer takes a rare drug or has a super rare disease or heterochromic eyes and a limp that no one else limps like. They make these scientists and detectives out to be super intelligent masterminds but the way the scripts are written they are just so lucky they should be buying lottery tickets every day.

This is so not like real life. That one magic thing that narrows people and places down to just one possibility is about as common as they tell you those magic single disease/building component/soil content things are. Not every single murder can be solved by running a bunch of scientific tests.
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Old 02-04-2017, 11:34 PM
Dale Sams Dale Sams is offline
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Originally Posted by digs View Post
Back in the 70s, I'd laugh at all the historical characters with perfectly coiffed hair.

Trendy-haired actors refusing to cut their hair for a military role (Helloooo, Hawkeye and B.J. Hunnicut...) was even a thread here, from the early 00's.

I think the perfect, overly-whitened teeth are just as jarring. But can we blame that one on the writers? Couldn't that be taken care of with a few minutes in the makeup chair, painting an actor's teeth?
At least in the 70's actors *mostly* looked like real people. Alan Alda and Mike Farrell simply arn't going to be confused for male models.

My contribution is a timely one: treason. The writers frequently get the definition wrong and even if not....a case hasn't been brought in decades.

Tony Almeda lets a terrorist go in an attempt to save his wife?? That's...obstruction of justice (??) at worst. I may be wrong but the idea of that being a modern benchmark for treason is ludicrous.
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Old 02-05-2017, 09:24 AM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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Most branches of the US military do not salute indoors except in some cases. I know the air force does not and I think the same is true for the army.
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  #17  
Old 02-05-2017, 09:33 AM
Hocus Pocus Hocus Pocus is offline
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Reading a person their rights (actually known as Miranda Rights) anytime they arrest someone. The Miranda rights have little to do with being arrested & more to do with questioning a suspect. If an officer suspects a person of a crime & wishes to question them he/she must advise the suspect of their rights, arrested or not. Likewise, if an officer arrests someone but doesn't intend to question the person yet the rights don't have to be read yet.
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Old 02-05-2017, 09:43 AM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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Reading a person their rights (actually known as Miranda Rights) anytime they arrest someone. The Miranda rights have little to do with being arrested & more to do with questioning a suspect. If an officer suspects a person of a crime & wishes to question them he/she must advise the suspect of their rights, arrested or not. Likewise, if an officer arrests someone but doesn't intend to question the person yet the rights don't have to be read yet.
In what situation would you arrest but not question someone?


mmm
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  #19  
Old 02-05-2017, 09:53 AM
silenus silenus is offline
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DUI, caught in the act, general annoying of everybody...the list is endless. They arrest you, transport you, then think about questioning you, if they need to.
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Old 02-05-2017, 10:24 AM
Hocus Pocus Hocus Pocus is offline
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In what situation would you arrest but not question someone?
High profile case where detectives are to do the questioning.
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  #21  
Old 02-05-2017, 01:24 PM
Lamia Lamia is offline
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Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
Patient has AB+ blood. Patient needs a transfusion. The hunt is on for a donor with AB+ blood. No other type will be suitable. And AB+ blood is so super-rare that it's almost impossible to find a donor.

(In real life, AB+ is called the universal recipient. It can receive blood from A, B, AB or O, and either rhesus positive or negative. And AB+ blood isn't as rare as all that anyway.)
Is there some specific movie or TV show you're thinking of here? I don't think I've ever seen this particular mistake, and while that doesn't mean it's never happened I don't believe it's a common error.
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  #22  
Old 02-05-2017, 08:52 PM
Joey P Joey P is online now
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Every reprobate, no matter how down and out they are, has perfect Hollywood teeth. Even immigrants, from countries where dentistry is virtually unknown.
That one always drives me nuts. Anyone that's either homeless, drug addict or has been working a hard job their entire life (assuming they're not an extra), when they look at the camera has bright white teeth and/or piercing blue eyes. It's confirmation bias, I know, but when you see it, it's distracting. They spent all this money on the movie and can darken the actor's teeth with a grease pencil or something.
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Old 02-05-2017, 09:11 PM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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Scriptwriters and movie makers who live in Los Angeles making movies/tv shows that are supposed to be set in a cold place always drives me a little bit crazy - those of us who live in cold places can always tell when they're faking a "cold" place. You cant see the actors' breath, nothing warm outside is steaming, the snow doesn't sound right, the snow doesn't melt when it hits a warm human or when they come inside - the list just goes on and on. The movie "Fargo" got it the closest to right, but they still have a big flub when they had William Macy's character scrape his car before he started it - I and no one I know would ever do it in that order.
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Old 02-05-2017, 09:14 PM
Dale Sams Dale Sams is offline
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Originally Posted by Cat Whisperer View Post
Scriptwriters and movie makers who live in Los Angeles making movies/tv shows that are supposed to be set in a cold place always drives me a little bit crazy - those of us who live in cold places can always tell when they're faking a "cold" place. You cant see the actors' breath, nothing warm outside is steaming, the snow doesn't sound right, the snow doesn't melt when it hits a warm human or when they come inside - the list just goes on and on. The movie "Fargo" got it the closest to right, but they still have a big flub when they had William Macy's character scrape his car before he started it - I and no one I know would ever do it in that order.
Maybe his heater is broken like in my car.
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Old 02-05-2017, 09:40 PM
cochrane cochrane is online now
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Translation? Never come across the term "Missileer" and don't know what "guns on alert" are...
Missileers are the crew in the control room of a missile launch center. During the Cold War, they were in a constant state of alert. In 1991, President George H. W. Bush had them stand down from that state. Missile officers were formerly required to carry sidearms during a state of high alert. They were no longer required to carry after Bush's orders to stand down. Presumably, some movies set in the present still depict missileers wearing weapons while on duty.

http://www.nytimes.com/1991/09/30/us...-at-bases.html
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Old 02-05-2017, 09:47 PM
Finagle Finagle is offline
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Not sure it's a scriptwriting thing, because I understand the motivation behind it, but the latest trailer for the new King Kong movie shows the giant ape knocking helicopters out of the air left and right. Admittedly, I'm not a combat pilot, but I'm pretty sure that if I were piloting a craft armed with rockets and cannon capable of reaching out and touching someone from hundreds of yards away, well....that's where I'd be. I can't think of any reason why you'd ever fly that close to your target, whether it's an enemy emplacement or a 100 foot tall ape. Yet in virtually every "giant creature vs modern flying death machine", the giant creature takes down the aircraft with the greatest of ease. (This is also true for any superhero vs aircraft -- instead of hovering safely out of range, your average hoverjet pilot will position himself in a perfect position for, say, Captain America to knock him out of the sky with a motorcycle and a Vibranium manhole cover.)
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Old 02-05-2017, 09:57 PM
Bayard Bayard is offline
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Every reprobate, no matter how down and out they are, has perfect Hollywood teeth. Even immigrants, from countries where dentistry is virtually unknown.
IIRC, they handled this pretty well in The Wire, where characters like Bubbles had awful teeth. Also, in the brilliant and disturbing Monster, professional beautiful person Charlize Theron sports some discolored, protruding prosthetic teeth.

Those are the only examples I can think of offhand. Usually, you're right, every medieval peasant has lovely teeth.
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Old 02-05-2017, 10:20 PM
UltraVires UltraVires is offline
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Hitting someone over the head with the butt of a gun to temporarily disable them.
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  #29  
Old 02-05-2017, 10:23 PM
Hampshire Hampshire is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Whisperer View Post
Scriptwriters and movie makers who live in Los Angeles making movies/tv shows that are supposed to be set in a cold place always drives me a little bit crazy - those of us who live in cold places can always tell when they're faking a "cold" place.
The movie Frozen (not the Disney one) where the kids were stuck on the ski lift drove me nuts. They're supposedly stuck freezing to death yet none of them are wearing gloves and don't have the common sense to shove their hands in their pockets or pull them up into their sleeves. One girl even falls asleep with her bare hands on the steel lap bar and wakes up with them stuck to it. I guess nobody in LA has ever experienced cold hands before.
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Old 02-05-2017, 10:39 PM
Ulf the Unwashed Ulf the Unwashed is offline
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Originally Posted by Cat Whisperer View Post
Scriptwriters and movie makers who live in Los Angeles making movies/tv shows that are supposed to be set in a cold place always drives me a little bit crazy - those of us who live in cold places can always tell when they're faking a "cold" place. You cant see the actors' breath, nothing warm outside is steaming, the snow doesn't sound right, the snow doesn't melt when it hits a warm human or when they come inside - the list just goes on and on. The movie "Fargo" got it the closest to right, but they still have a big flub when they had William Macy's character scrape his car before he started it - I and no one I know would ever do it in that order.
While I agree with your observations in general, I will say that this very morning I did scrape the car before starting it...there wasn't much ice, and I was already late for church. A few back-and-forths with the scraper and I was good to go without having to fold my frame into the drivers seat and then back out.

Yes, if there's significant buildup the story is otherwise.
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  #31  
Old 02-05-2017, 10:58 PM
nightshadea nightshadea is offline
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anything to do with console/pc games ....... its usually a Xbox controller hooked to a ps2 with Atari packman sounds

But the funniest scene ever is in a first season murder she wrote .. is angela and claude atkins trying to play the arcade version of spyhunter ......the dialogue shows they nor the writers have no idea that for the first 999 seconds is unlimited lives and the car has guns ...........
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  #32  
Old 02-05-2017, 11:04 PM
alphaboi867 alphaboi867 is online now
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Originally Posted by digs View Post
Back in the 70s, I'd laugh at all the historical characters with perfectly coiffed hair...
Women in period pieces always seem to follow grooming practices of then the film/TV series is filmed, rather than when it's set. Ditto for post-apocalyptic settings; civilization may have collapsed, but all the women are still shaving their legs & armpits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Whisperer View Post
Scriptwriters and movie makers who live in Los Angeles making movies/tv shows that are supposed to be set in a cold place always drives me a little bit crazy - those of us who live in cold places can always tell when they're faking a "cold" place. You cant see the actors' breath, nothing warm outside is steaming, the snow doesn't sound right, the snow doesn't melt when it hits a warm human or when they come inside - the list just goes on and on...
They also ignore how filthy everyone's cars get in the winter.
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Old 02-06-2017, 01:27 AM
scabpicker scabpicker is offline
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Originally Posted by ftg View Post
A computer searching for a password one letter at a time. And each letter takes the same amount of time. (War Games, for example.)*

Something is being decrypted on the screen and individual characters are decoded in random places until they all are. (Sleepers, for example.)

Not sure if all of these can be blamed on the writer. Flunkies in production might cause many of them.

* This used to happen a lot in real life due to crappy programs. Very rare now but there have been web login exploits that use this. Of course the "ultra-secure password" systems in these movies don't fall into this category.
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Originally Posted by Trinopus View Post
This was done right in Terminator 2 (I think?) Young John Connor is breaking a four-digit PIN, and the time per digit decreased; the first digit took some minutes, but the fourth digit snapped past almost instantly.

(Okay, it still wouldn't work that way: a real ATM only allows a very small number of attempts before locking down. But, hey, it was a small nod toward a kind of numerical accuracy!)

One little detail scripts get wrong a lot: reporters and journalists never take the extra moment to ask for the spelling of names. In real life, they must take that effort. Johnson? Johnston? Johnstone? Having it on a little hand-held voice recorder won't cut the mustard!


I don't recall anyone ever making password cracking believable in a movie script. Only a horrible password verification system would tell you which characters you've successfully guessed. Since the programmer would have to go to extra effort to report that back to you*, anyone writing such a thing would quickly realize "Why I am I helping these assholes guess passwords?"

Nope, externally brute forcing passwords is thousands/millions of "nope, nope, nope" answers until you brute force exactly the right one completely by virtue of the vast number of combinations you've tried, then you get a yes. You don't know you've got the first digit right until you know you've gotten all of them right. I understand that "ok, I'll run this script and we'll check back in a week" doesn't really build suspense in the same way, so I accept it. But brute forcing passwords simply doesn't work that way, and I've never seen a system written to assist the person guessing the password.

But even though I accept it. I wish they would stop. Find some other way to build suspense, pretty please.




*And in the modern era of passwords stored in a one-way hash, it's effectively impossible.

Last edited by scabpicker; 02-06-2017 at 01:28 AM..
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  #34  
Old 02-06-2017, 03:06 AM
Nava Nava is offline
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Every reprobate, no matter how down and out they are, has perfect Hollywood teeth. Even immigrants, from countries where dentistry is virtually unknown.
And people in Ancient Rome.


There's only two blood types: the aforementioned AB+, and O-.
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Old 02-06-2017, 03:43 AM
Face Intentionally Left Blank Face Intentionally Left Blank is offline
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Originally Posted by scabpicker View Post
I don't recall anyone ever making password cracking believable in a movie script. Only a horrible password verification system would tell you which characters you've successfully guessed. Since the programmer would have to go to extra effort to report that back to you*, anyone writing such a thing would quickly realize "Why I am I helping these assholes guess passwords?"

Nope, externally brute forcing passwords is thousands/millions of "nope, nope, nope" answers until you brute force exactly the right one completely by virtue of the vast number of combinations you've tried, then you get a yes. You don't know you've got the first digit right until you know you've gotten all of them right.
Thank you.

The "one character is decoded, now the next . . .they'll have the password inside a minute at this rate!" thing drives me insane. Either you have the whole password, or you have no idea how close you are to guessing the password. As you said, the programmers don't HELP people guess the password.
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Old 02-06-2017, 04:39 AM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is offline
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The hacker types quickly on a computer keyboard. Every single key press makes a small beep sound.
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Old 02-06-2017, 05:36 AM
Grrr! Grrr! is online now
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Apparently, every hospital in the world has a "Dr. Blair" and a "Dr. J Hamilton" that works there.

This can be gleaned by listening to the lady in the background on the hospital intercom..
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  #38  
Old 02-06-2017, 06:10 AM
The Pork-Chop Express The Pork-Chop Express is offline
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You see this one a lot in medieval/fantasy tv shows and movies: people stabbing their swords into the ground, either as some kind of statement or because they have nowhere else to put it.

Would never happen. It would take a lot of time and effort to keep the point of a sword sharp, so voluntarily reducing its effectiveness would be crazy.

"Hey, I'm gonna fuck up my sword so it's worse at killing folk, but I sure look cool!"

Last edited by The Pork-Chop Express; 02-06-2017 at 06:10 AM..
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  #39  
Old 02-06-2017, 06:13 AM
The Pork-Chop Express The Pork-Chop Express is offline
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Originally Posted by UltraVires View Post
Hitting someone over the head with the butt of a gun to temporarily disable them.
On a related note: people getting knocked out and waking up hours later. If you're knocked out for more than a minute or two, you've incurred a serious, permanent brain injury.
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  #40  
Old 02-06-2017, 06:55 AM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
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Originally Posted by UltraVires View Post
Hitting someone over the head with the butt of a gun to temporarily disable them.
yes. I'll even extend it; any time the protagonist gets hit on the head, knocked out, then wakes up hours later and immediately starts looking for evidence/an escape/whatever.

Um, no. if you get hit on the head and lose consciousness for more than about a minute, you likely have a concussion and need medical attention. you're not just going to pick up where your cunning plan left off.

edit: sort-of-ninja'd.

I think what really irritates me the most is what TV Tropes calls SoCalization. Meaning, pretending things are the same everywhere else in the country as they are in SoCal. The worst offender in recent history was the TV show Detroit 1-8-7. Section 187 is the California penal code for murder and bears no resemblance to the numbering used in the Michigan Compiled Laws.

I will admit that "Detroit 750.316" doesn't exactly roll off of the tongue, but they should have just come up with a different title entirely.

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Old 02-06-2017, 07:03 AM
Nava Nava is offline
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You see this one a lot in medieval/fantasy tv shows and movies: people stabbing their swords into the ground, either as some kind of statement or because they have nowhere else to put it.

Would never happen. It would take a lot of time and effort to keep the point of a sword sharp, so voluntarily reducing its effectiveness would be crazy.

"Hey, I'm gonna fuck up my sword so it's worse at killing folk, but I sure look cool!"
Actually, it did happen.

Once.

In the 15th century, two swords, stabbed point down into the dirt while their owners joined the Regent inside a tent that they wouldn't be allowed to leave until they'd reached an agreement she could live with.

But it was so rare that the two swords and a crown representing the three-way meeting became the blazon of the little hamlet, raised to the status of village and made head of an electoral circunscription in commemoration.
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  #42  
Old 02-06-2017, 07:11 AM
DesertDog DesertDog is offline
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Originally Posted by alphaboi867 View Post
Women in period pieces always seem to follow grooming practices of then the film/TV series is filmed, rather than when it's set.
This. I love westerns and I'm always amused by the way the women of the Olde West have various hair styles, depending on when the movie was made.
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Old 02-06-2017, 07:34 AM
Rushgeekgirl Rushgeekgirl is offline
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Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
The hacker types quickly on a computer keyboard. Every single key press makes a small beep sound.
In the movie iBoy you get to see flashing: HACKING...HACKING...HACKING....
HACKING COMPLETE!
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  #44  
Old 02-06-2017, 07:40 AM
Yllaria Yllaria is offline
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Originally Posted by DesertDog View Post
This. I love westerns and I'm always amused by the way the women of the Olde West have various hair styles, depending on when the movie was made.
Sometimes you can date a movie by the eye makeup, too.
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Old 02-06-2017, 08:06 AM
Ludovic Ludovic is offline
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Come to think of it, wouldn't resting swords in the ground make them more deadly since they would pick up bacteria such that any nick would introduce fatal wounds? Wouldn't help in combat of course.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nava View Post
Actually, it did happen.

Once.

In the 15th century
For 20 minutes. Thank you, I'll be here all millennium!
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Old 02-06-2017, 08:21 AM
The Pork-Chop Express The Pork-Chop Express is offline
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Originally Posted by Nava View Post
Actually, it did happen.

Once.

In the 15th century, two swords, stabbed point down into the dirt while their owners joined the Regent inside a tent that they wouldn't be allowed to leave until they'd reached an agreement she could live with.

But it was so rare that the two swords and a crown representing the three-way meeting became the blazon of the little hamlet, raised to the status of village and made head of an electoral circunscription in commemoration.
Interesting! But I'd bet those two weren't proper swordsmen, more probably titled idlers toadying like billy bedamned.
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Old 02-06-2017, 08:23 AM
The Pork-Chop Express The Pork-Chop Express is offline
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Come to think of it, wouldn't resting swords in the ground make them more deadly since they would pick up bacteria such that any nick would introduce fatal wounds? Wouldn't help in combat of course.
If that was my game, I'd carry around a dead rat with whose rancid guts I would coat my killing steel. More fit for purpose!

Last edited by The Pork-Chop Express; 02-06-2017 at 08:25 AM..
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Old 02-06-2017, 10:51 AM
Kimballkid Kimballkid is offline
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The movie "Fargo" got it the closest to right, but they still have a big flub when they had William Macy's character scrape his car before he started it - I and no one I know would ever do it in that order.
I do it that way pretty much all the time. I hate wasting gas.
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Old 02-06-2017, 11:04 AM
Gedd Gedd is offline
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The freedom everyday people have to wander around.

High school kids - "I have class, but go hang with my friends outside."

Police officers - "I'm on patrol, but I just thought of something relating to a crime so I'll visit a suspect's house."

I'm sure there are more, I can't think of them now though.
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  #50  
Old 02-06-2017, 11:17 AM
Projammer Projammer is offline
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We could probably fill another thread with the things that are not even remotely right with computers and information technology in general.

Law enforcement agents hacking other agencies and businesses. (Looking at NCIS) Unless your job description is 'hacking' and you have a work order that says 'Hack Amazon', you can kiss that security clearance goodbye. You hack a state or federal agency and you're looking at a lovely stay at the Hotel Gitmo.

Moving onto online history. The suspect purchased a knife matching the murder weapon in 2013 from [random website]. Where's your warrant for [random website] and how did you justify it? You hacked their store database? See above. About the only way to get this info without a warrant is if they made a public post it on FaceSpace and their FS security settings allow everyone to see your public posts.

Okay. I've got a warrant for their credit card records and found the knife purchase there. Nope again. You might have found the transaction for the purchase but CC companies don't get itemized receipts. They have the purchase total and that's it. You can't tell from the transaction log whether they bought a knife or a bottle of taint oil.

Finally for this post. All the internet companies seem to have their home office right there in the city where the detective can conveniently deliver the warrant or just twist someones arm if they didn't have time to get a warrant.
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