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  #51  
Old 02-06-2017, 11:21 AM
Channing Idaho Banks Channing Idaho Banks is offline
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Cinderella moments where a person is brought back to life by a loved one, and are unharmed. Mi3, The Fifth Element.
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  #52  
Old 02-06-2017, 11:27 AM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
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Originally Posted by Gedd View Post
High school kids - "I have class, but go hang with my friends outside."
I think kids' characters are poorly-written by and large. It's a big reason I can't stand sitcoms. Children on TV are nearly always sarcastic little adults who have a snarky wisecrack at the ready all of the time. I see these things and I'm like "what kid acts like this, really?" Nobody I know of; not when I was one, and not now.
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  #53  
Old 02-06-2017, 12:46 PM
Saint Cad Saint Cad is offline
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No matter if a scabbard is metal, leather or wood, every time it comes in or goes out - SHHHHHIIIINNNK. Think of Michonne's katana in The Walking Dead. The scabbard is wood and if it scraped metal as much as it sounds like every time it was used it would be a nub by now.

Last edited by Saint Cad; 02-06-2017 at 12:48 PM..
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  #54  
Old 02-06-2017, 01:20 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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That's really not the writer's problem now, is it? I'd blame that sort of thing on a lazy sound editor.

Unless the writer actually put "SHHHHIIIINNNK" in the script, of course. Then by all means blame him!
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  #55  
Old 02-06-2017, 01:31 PM
muldoonthief muldoonthief is offline
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Originally Posted by Dale Sams View Post
Maybe his heater is broken like in my car.
Jerry was the sales manager at a car dealership. No reason he'd be driving a car that wasn't in perfect condition.
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  #56  
Old 02-06-2017, 01:40 PM
Projammer Projammer is offline
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I really shouldn't have narrowed it down to just scriptwriters. Really doing things wrong in a show or movie takes a team effort. S/he doesn't decide to use that lame-ass character search password breaker. Probably. I still need to have words with the bozo that did make the decision. Admitted, the real deal has zero excitement to watch, but I'm sure there's a better mockup out there somewhere.

Consider the scope expanded to take in everyone who decides what and how things are done.
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  #57  
Old 02-06-2017, 01:42 PM
FairyChatMom FairyChatMom is offline
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Originally Posted by jz78817 View Post
I think what really irritates me the most is what TV Tropes calls SoCalization. Meaning, pretending things are the same everywhere else in the country as they are in SoCal.
This shows up in NCIS a lot. Around DC, we don't refer to our main interstate as "the 95" or its spur as "the 395". We do say "the beltway" but no one that I know around here has ever prefixed a route number with "the" - well, except when the number is used as an adjective, as in "the 95 bypass" or "the 495 north exit." Crap like that takes me right out of a story.
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  #58  
Old 02-06-2017, 02:11 PM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
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Originally Posted by FairyChatMom View Post
This shows up in NCIS a lot. Around DC, we don't refer to our main interstate as "the 95" or its spur as "the 395". We do say "the beltway" but no one that I know around here has ever prefixed a route number with "the" - well, except when the number is used as an adjective, as in "the 95 bypass" or "the 495 north exit." Crap like that takes me right out of a story.
same. I've heard "the 94" from media sources. in reality, if we speak of a freeway, we either use its official designation (I-94, I-96, I-75, etc.) leave off the "I" and call them 94, 96, 75, etc) or use their old names before numbering and the Interstate system (e.g. the Ford freeway, the Jeffries, the Chrysler freeway, etc.)

Last edited by jz78817; 02-06-2017 at 02:13 PM..
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  #59  
Old 02-06-2017, 04:34 PM
GESancMan GESancMan is offline
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Originally Posted by Grrr! View Post
Apparently, every hospital in the world has a "Dr. Blair" and a "Dr. J Hamilton" that works there.

This can be gleaned by listening to the lady in the background on the hospital intercom..
It's not just on screen. Those doctors even work at the hospital in Queensryche's Operation Mindcrime.
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  #60  
Old 02-06-2017, 05:35 PM
whitetho whitetho is offline
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Hugh Laurie complained that some writers didn't even know their own industry. In particular, he noted that not once in his entire career has an exasperated director paused shooting after saying something along the lines of "Take five, everybody!"

Last edited by whitetho; 02-06-2017 at 05:38 PM.. Reason: Script doctoring
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  #61  
Old 02-06-2017, 07:42 PM
Hampshire Hampshire is online now
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Apparently everyone in IT is entirely unable to estimate how long a hacking job will take.
"Jim! How long will it take you to hack into the mainframe and redirect auxillary power to the generators?!!"
"Wow, at least 3 to 4 hours."
"You've got 5 minutes. Go, go, go!"

(Hey, whadda ya know? I did it.)
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  #62  
Old 02-06-2017, 07:51 PM
buddha_david buddha_david is offline
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No one ever has trouble parking. There's always a free space immediately in front of wherever they're visiting.

No one ever coughs, sneezes, or sniffles. If they do, it's an ominous sign of a terminal disease.
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  #63  
Old 02-06-2017, 08:09 PM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is online now
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Originally Posted by Hampshire View Post
Apparently everyone in IT is entirely unable to estimate how long a hacking job will take.
"Jim! How long will it take you to hack into the mainframe and redirect auxillary power to the generators?!!"
"Wow, at least 3 to 4 hours."
"You've got 5 minutes. Go, go, go!"

(Hey, whadda ya know? I did it.)

It's the Scotty approach to miracle working.
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  #64  
Old 02-06-2017, 09:05 PM
D_Odds D_Odds is online now
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Originally Posted by buddha_david View Post
No one ever has trouble parking. There's always a free space immediately in front of wherever they're visiting.
I hate Hate HATE every time people bring this up.

Unless it is a specific plot point or one is going to use the time for exposition, having parking in a TV show/movie work like real life would kill the flow of the show. As a NYC driver and parker, no one wants to watch someone circle around in a 5 block radius for 20 minutes like a vulture looking for carrion, nor wait 10 minutes to get one's car parked at a garage (and even longer getting it back out). And even if a director is using the time for exposition, it's really boring screen time. You'll lose the audience.

No one is getting it wrong. This (and many other mundane tasks whose time is shortened) is done on purpose because watching real life is boring. It's called pacing, and the script writers/directors are getting it right (in regards to this).
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  #65  
Old 02-06-2017, 10:31 PM
digs digs is offline
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Originally Posted by D_Odds View Post
...This (and many other mundane tasks whose time is shortened) is done on purpose because watching real life is boring. It's called pacing, and the script writers/directors are getting it right (in regards to this).
If you want more realistic pacing, I've been watching some old cop shows where they indeed show every time-consuming detail. Here's a scene from O'Hara, U.S. Treasury:

"Okay, Sarge. Worldwide Widgets. We'll check out their factory." Do they then show them arriving at the widget factory? Nooooo...

David Janssen and partner leave their sergeant's office, get their coats off their chairs, wind their way through the warren of desks and leave the precinct office. Down a hallway, past the shoeshine guy by the front door. Finally a cut, to an exterior shot as they exit the building and walk down the office steps, cross the sidewalk, get in the car, slam the doors, there's a pause as they put on their seat belts, then we hear the car start, wait for a few civilians to pass by, then pull out into traffic... and we still have to watch them take forever to drive uptown!

Back in the late 60s/early 70s, they seem to be taking what would nowadays be a half hour show and expanding it to fill an hour of police "drama" (often without any actual drama due to the leaden pace). So give me shortened "reality" any day.
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  #66  
Old 02-06-2017, 10:47 PM
excavating (for a mind) excavating (for a mind) is online now
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One that always gets me is the plot device where one of the officers/investigators/technicians has a personal relationship to the victim/suspect and they are allowed to continue to "work the case". Maybe in some Podunk town where there are only two investigators and one is on vacation, but IRL they would never allow the "C of Ds" to pursue his daughter's rapist. It would never happen.
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  #67  
Old 02-06-2017, 11:32 PM
Derleth Derleth is online now
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Originally Posted by digs View Post
Back in the late 60s/early 70s, they seem to be taking what would nowadays be a half hour show and expanding it to fill an hour of police "drama" (often without any actual drama due to the leaden pace).
And even at that, they'd cut the paperwork entirely simply so the result would be watchable, as opposed to something akin to the mid-air refueling scenes in The Starfighters, or the driving scenes in Manos: The Hands of Fate.

That's why shows will never be able to show the actual task of programming or system administration or, for that matter, writing or editing something like a film script. It's too internal. The closest you could come would be showing a meeting where the ideas for the program are discussed, or showing the writer pacing around talking to themself trying to clear a creative block. So I don't fault script writers for not writing that stuff accurately. I do fault them for holding onto particularly stupid clichés, but more because they're clichéd than anything else.
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  #68  
Old 02-07-2017, 04:53 AM
The Pork-Chop Express The Pork-Chop Express is offline
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Originally Posted by D_Odds View Post
I hate Hate HATE every time people bring this up.

Unless it is a specific plot point or one is going to use the time for exposition, having parking in a TV show/movie work like real life would kill the flow of the show. As a NYC driver and parker, no one wants to watch someone circle around in a 5 block radius for 20 minutes like a vulture looking for carrion, nor wait 10 minutes to get one's car parked at a garage (and even longer getting it back out). And even if a director is using the time for exposition, it's really boring screen time. You'll lose the audience.

No one is getting it wrong. This (and many other mundane tasks whose time is shortened) is done on purpose because watching real life is boring. It's called pacing, and the script writers/directors are getting it right (in regards to this).
If done right, it can work. I know it wasn't exactly the same thing, but in The Sopranos series finale, Meadow Soprano's struggle to park across the street from the diner she was meeting her family at was very effective.

Last edited by The Pork-Chop Express; 02-07-2017 at 04:54 AM..
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  #69  
Old 02-07-2017, 08:30 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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The list of credits for a picture include Foley Editor. They dub in sound that adds atmosphere. They love birds, but know nothing about them.
Foley Editors alllive in Southern California, and on weekends they take their family to the desert, where they can't miss hearing the noisy Cactus Wrens. That's what they think birds sound like outside the city. So when they have a scene of the Pilgrims landing at Plymouth Rock, they dub in Cactus wrens.

The Common Loon makes an auditory appearance in every film from the creepy Louisiana swamps. But loons pass through Louisiana only in migration, and are silent when not on their northwoods nesting grounds.

Everybody now seems to know that Bald Eagles are silent. Except the Foley Editors, who simply can't resist the knee-jerk temptation to dub in the call of the Red Tailed Hawk wherever an eagle appears.

And, of course, frogs. The only species of frog in America that says "rivet" lives in Califormia. Anywhere besides the Pacific coast, you'll never hear a frog say "rivet".

Last edited by jtur88; 02-07-2017 at 08:33 AM..
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  #70  
Old 02-07-2017, 08:37 AM
Just Asking Questions Just Asking Questions is offline
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Originally Posted by jz78817 View Post
same. I've heard "the 94" from media sources. in reality, if we speak of a freeway, we either use its official designation (I-94, I-96, I-75, etc.) leave off the "I" and call them 94, 96, 75, etc) or use their old names before numbering and the Interstate system (e.g. the Ford freeway, the Jeffries, the Chrysler freeway, etc.)
Arizona is a weird hybrid. They combine CA and the rest of the country and say "The I-10". It grates both of my sensibilities - the WI (I90) part and the LA part (the 101).

Or, to mention another local pet peeve - the newscasters, they say it like that.
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  #71  
Old 02-07-2017, 08:44 AM
D_Odds D_Odds is online now
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Originally Posted by The Pork-Chop Express View Post
If done right, it can work. I know it wasn't exactly the same thing, but in The Sopranos series finale, Meadow Soprano's struggle to park across the street from the diner she was meeting her family at was very effective.
That was a plot point, building the tension for the upcoming ambiguous series ending. I certainly don't think it can never be used, just that it needs a purpose other than portraying the reality of finding parking in a city. jtur88 excellently describes things they get wrong every time. Street parking is not one of them.
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  #72  
Old 02-07-2017, 08:56 AM
Ludovic Ludovic is offline
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I don't think showing unnecessary everyday time consumption always has to advance a plot point or to provide exposition. If you have a quirky filmmaking style you could use it to insert entertaining vignettes which are pleasantly random and/or provide insight to the character's personality. Now I'm not sure if anyone like the Coen Brothers has ever done that but it's possible.
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  #73  
Old 02-07-2017, 09:20 AM
wolfpup wolfpup is offline
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I don't recall anyone ever making password cracking believable in a movie script. Only a horrible password verification system would tell you which characters you've successfully guessed. Since the programmer would have to go to extra effort to report that back to you*, anyone writing such a thing would quickly realize "Why I am I helping these assholes guess passwords?"

Nope, externally brute forcing passwords is thousands/millions of "nope, nope, nope" answers until you brute force exactly the right one completely by virtue of the vast number of combinations you've tried, then you get a yes. You don't know you've got the first digit right until you know you've gotten all of them right. I understand that "ok, I'll run this script and we'll check back in a week" doesn't really build suspense in the same way, so I accept it. But brute forcing passwords simply doesn't work that way, and I've never seen a system written to assist the person guessing the password.

But even though I accept it. I wish they would stop. Find some other way to build suspense, pretty please.
Yeah, the idea that the access control system is actively collaborating with the bad guy is hilarious! A proper security system will be specifically designed to provide no information beyond "invalid login", whether the problem is the user name, the password, the combination, or something else, and after "n" failed attempts it should go into defensive mode and lock out the account altogether. It will definitely NOT say "ooohh ... so close, try it again with a different sixth digit this time!"
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Originally Posted by D_Odds View Post
I hate Hate HATE every time people bring this up.

Unless it is a specific plot point or one is going to use the time for exposition, having parking in a TV show/movie work like real life would kill the flow of the show. As a NYC driver and parker, no one wants to watch someone circle around in a 5 block radius for 20 minutes like a vulture looking for carrion, nor wait 10 minutes to get one's car parked at a garage (and even longer getting it back out). And even if a director is using the time for exposition, it's really boring screen time. You'll lose the audience.

No one is getting it wrong. This (and many other mundane tasks whose time is shortened) is done on purpose because watching real life is boring. It's called pacing, and the script writers/directors are getting it right (in regards to this).
You have a good point about pacing, but it's possible to achieve both pacing and realism at the same time. You can just show the guy getting out of the car already parked, or skip that part entirely and just show him walking into the building. What drives the "unrealism" meter into the red is when the scene shows the hero's car gliding gracefully to a stop directly in front of a major NYC building on a major NYC street with not another car anywhere in sight.
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  #74  
Old 02-07-2017, 09:31 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by digs View Post
Back in the late 60s/early 70s, they seem to be taking what would nowadays be a half hour show and expanding it to fill an hour of police "drama" (often without any actual drama due to the leaden pace). So give me shortened "reality" any day.
Ditto. I don't go to the movies to see hyper-realism. Reality, in its full mundane glory, is boring and only in extreme situations suitable to dramatic pacing. Just get to the meat of the story and keep it going. It's never once occurred to me or taken me out of the movie because someone finds a parking space too quickly. And, yes, of course this can be subverted for dramatic effect or to prolong suspense, but 95% of the time I don't need realistic parking or a cut scene to side-step the issue.
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  #75  
Old 02-07-2017, 09:35 AM
D_Odds D_Odds is online now
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Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
What drives the "unrealism" meter into the red is when the scene shows the hero's car gliding gracefully to a stop directly in front of a major NYC building on a major NYC street with not another car anywhere in sight.
Could happen, especially on street cleaning days or on roads with no parking.
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  #76  
Old 02-07-2017, 09:56 AM
Steve MB Steve MB is online now
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Originally Posted by D_Odds View Post
Unless it is a specific plot point or one is going to use the time for exposition, having parking in a TV show/movie work like real life would kill the flow of the show. As a NYC driver and parker, no one wants to watch someone circle around in a 5 block radius for 20 minutes like a vulture looking for carrion, nor wait 10 minutes to get one's car parked at a garage (and even longer getting it back out). And even if a director is using the time for exposition, it's really boring screen time. You'll lose the audience.
Since somebody already invoked TVTropes:

Quote:
Any time the hero is really in a hurry, there is always an empty parking space directly in front of their destination. Even if in, say, downtown New York. This is generally seen as an Acceptable Break from Reality as really, no one wants to watch an hour of the heroes searching around to find parking... unless, of course, it's the point of the episode.
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  #77  
Old 02-07-2017, 10:01 AM
Drum God Drum God is offline
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I've been involved in public education my entire life, and I have never heard the leader of the school called "Principal Smith". The principal is always Mr. Smith or Mrs. Jones. The job title is never used in addressing the person or referencing the person in other conversation. On TV programs, however, the principal seems always to be "Principal So-and-So".

I'm always amazed at how people in New York City manage to run into each other. They live in a city of millions of people from all over the world, yet bump into each other while shopping, dining, or whatever.
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  #78  
Old 02-07-2017, 10:03 AM
wolfpup wolfpup is offline
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Could happen, especially on street cleaning days or on roads with no parking.
I think in most big cities the only way it could happen is if it was a "don't even think about stopping here" zone, where our hero would have his car towed away before he even had a chance to get out of it.

It could also happen if the entire street was closed because a movie was being filmed there.
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  #79  
Old 02-07-2017, 10:25 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Drum God View Post
I'm always amazed at how people in New York City manage to run into each other. They live in a city of millions of people from all over the world, yet bump into each other while shopping, dining, or whatever.
I don't know about NYC, but, as a Chicagoan, it happen more often than you would expect. People from similar social circles tend to shop/eat/etc at similar places.
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  #80  
Old 02-07-2017, 10:29 AM
D_Odds D_Odds is online now
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I'm always amazed at how people in New York City manage to run into each other. They live in a city of millions of people from all over the world, yet bump into each other while shopping, dining, or whatever.
This happens more often than one might think. I've been very surprised quite a number of times at chance meetings. It's not a daily occurence, nor even monthly, but maybe one to three times a year.
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  #81  
Old 02-07-2017, 11:00 AM
Projammer Projammer is offline
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Just reminded me of another one of my favorites..

Pop the face off the keypad and jumper a couple of wires. Door pops open. Help yourselves to some weapons or chemicals or whatever you were after.

In that sort of secure facility all the keypad is doing is sending the code to a physically secure control box somewhere on the other side of the wall which decides whether or not to open the door after consulting a computer somewhere else. Sure, there are still all-in-one units, but they're for low security rooms inside the facility after you've already been cleared inside.

Which reminds me. Hot wiring a car. Reach under the dash and pull out a bundle of wire. Cut/strip the ends of a couple. Drag them together a couple of times to strike some sparks and off you go! No. Just no. That's almost as much fail compressed into 15 seconds as hacking passwords mentioned earlier.
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  #82  
Old 02-07-2017, 11:16 AM
wolfpup wolfpup is offline
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Perhaps a little bit off the topic of movie scripts, but thinking about cars and parking and such, it occurs to me that nowhere is lack of realism more blatant than in TV ads. Not talking here about ads intended to be offbeat, creative or interesting, I'm talking about gratingly stupid.

What occurred to me, for instance, was the ad for a car insurance company I'm sometimes forced to endure, where some buffoon has just crashed his car in the middle of the night and calls the Cheerful Insurance Lady at 3:00 AM at the 24/7 call center. In real life, the person picking up the call would be grouchy and half asleep, totally pissed about having to work the night shift and hoping that her desk nap won't be disturbed by yet another drunken idiot who drove his car into a telephone pole. But not in Advertising World.

In Advertising World, this person greets the idiot driver like a long-lost brother, and runs through a gamut of emotions worthy of an Oscar, first expressing deep concern about whether this total stranger and incompetent buffoon might have sustained a Personal Injury, then emoting dramatic relief on hearing that he is OK, and then bouncing into business with the kind of ebullient cheerfulness that in the real world can only be induced by powerful drugs.

The claim is of course processed within seconds, with the kind of relentless cheerfulness hitherto unknown in the insurance business at any time, let alone at 3 AM. And we know it only took seconds, because for some reason the Cheerful Insurance Lady has a gigantic clock ticking away immediately behind her. And the cheerfulness is apparently contagious, because the incompetent buffoon is now happier than anyone has a right to be who has just crashed his car into a telephone pole. In fact he is happier than anyone has a right to be who has not just won a major lottery jackpot, and he is barely able to restrain himself from dancing a little jig of joy while the thing that used to be his car is visible in the background as a steaming pile of rubble.

That's more or less how I remember the ad. Precise details may vary, but that's basically the supposedly persuasive angle of it.
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  #83  
Old 02-07-2017, 11:21 AM
Victor Charlie Victor Charlie is offline
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Movies about television newsrooms or news coverage NEVER EVER get it right. Just a few -

Live wireless cameras - Until very recently, live cameras had to be cabled to a live truck to send out a live feed. Yet, one movie/tv show after another showed a photographer rushing to the scene with nothing more than a camera and immediately feeding a live picture.

Breaking laws to get exclusive video - "Nightcrawler" was a particularly egregious example of a news photographer illegally entering a home to get video of a crime scene. No station ANYWHERE would air that video. They'd be heavily fined and possibly lose their broadcast license.

References to ratings periods - More than once I've seen it referred to as "sweeps week" - "Bruce
Almighty" is one example. Sweeps periods last a full month (30 days to be specific) and nobody who works at a television station would make that mistake.

"Money Monster" portrayed a gunmen taking over a news studio during a live broadcast. No station or network would ever stay live in that situation. They'd immediately cut away no matter how many people the gunmen threatened to kill.
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  #84  
Old 02-07-2017, 11:40 AM
bump bump is online now
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The one that gets me is the way that law enforcement gets someone's PC, and in a short period of time (like maybe an hour or so), suddenly have this perfect looking smoking gun email chain.

First, you typically have to remove the hard drive, hook it up to special write-blocking hardware, and make a bit-by-bit image of the drive so that you don't wreck the actual evidence. This takes a good while (hours, probably), because you're typically doing it via USB connections, so even with a USB 3.0 drive at 480 mbps, you're still drastically slower than the drive's native speed, even if you're using an older 1.5 gbps SATA drive.


Then, once you have that drive image, you have to use specialized software(like say.. EnCase or FTK) to scan every bit and catalog everything it finds- deleted files, parts of deleted files, existing files, etc... This takes a long time as well.

Finally, someone has to go in and actually eyeball what the cataloguing software finds, and determine if it's relevant to the case.

In some cases, especially ones involving emails, the email archive files are found via the cataloguing process and then indexed with a dedicated email indexing software package that can combine and reconstruct email threads from multiple sources- individual clients and servers to get the complete picture.

So while it's possible for Abby to get someone's hard drive and do what she does, it's probably something that'll take her the better part of a 12 hour day, not something that Gibbs brings back at 10 am, and Abby's showing McGee the email chain at 2 o'clock. At that point, they'd probably still be in the middle of imaging the drive or indexing it.
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  #85  
Old 02-07-2017, 11:53 AM
Steve MB Steve MB is online now
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Originally Posted by bump View Post
In some cases, especially ones involving emails, the email archive files are found via the cataloguing process and then indexed with a dedicated email indexing software package that can combine and reconstruct email threads from multiple sources- individual clients and servers to get the complete picture.
If the computer isn't set up with any kind of dedicated e-mail security, the email archive files can be pulled from the standard directory used by Thunderbird or MS LookOut or whatever. If it is set up with any kind of half-decent e-mail security, the e-mail files will be encrypted and the investigators are SOL unless they can get the owner to cough up the password or they had already been conducting surveillance long enough to install spyware to scoop up the password.
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Last edited by Steve MB; 02-07-2017 at 11:53 AM..
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  #86  
Old 02-07-2017, 12:18 PM
Projammer Projammer is offline
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You just reminded me of another one..

Bad guy needs a file. Or good guy needs a file that proves all powerful EvilCo is drowning kittens and kicking puppies. This file is on a super secure server that's not attached to an external network so it can't be hacked with the leet password cracking tool. So our crook/hero has to pry the face off the keypad and jumper some connections to unlock the door to get into the server room to steal the physical disk.

A: Unless you've got inside info about where the server is physically mounted you're not going to have any clue where the drive is to steal.

B: The file isn't going to be on one drive. It's literally physically going to to be spread over anywhere from 5 to 16 drives in any sort of corporate IT installation. One drive gets you the equivalent of a random handful of stuffing from the shred bag. Even odds on top of that that it's going to be encrypted.
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  #87  
Old 02-07-2017, 12:40 PM
ivylass ivylass is offline
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Originally Posted by Victor Charlie View Post
"Money Monster" portrayed a gunmen taking over a news studio during a live broadcast. No station or network would ever stay live in that situation. They'd immediately cut away no matter how many people the gunmen threatened to kill.
Not only that, but security is just not that lax. I've been through security at 30 Rock. No way the guard is sleeping on duty. And it's quite simple to feed back in the video to the studio monitors so the gunman thinks he's still live (Murphy Brown did this correctly.)

Cancer. With drugs these days, you do not spend hours after chemo vomiting. (Unless you're allergic to compazine, which a fellow BC survivor was ). Yes, you lose your hair...but for some reason, the eyebrows and eyelashes remain on the actor.
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  #88  
Old 02-07-2017, 06:31 PM
alphaboi867 alphaboi867 is online now
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Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
...What occurred to me, for instance, was the ad for a car insurance company I'm sometimes forced to endure, where some buffoon has just crashed his car in the middle of the night and calls the Cheerful Insurance Lady at 3:00 AM at the 24/7 call center. In real life, the person picking up the call would be grouchy and half asleep, totally pissed about having to work the night shift and hoping that her desk nap won't be disturbed by yet another drunken idiot who drove his car into a telephone pole...
Actually in real life that person picking up the call on overnights is likely to be in India or the Philippines. The Operator from India is a well established Trope, but you rarely hear about the Philippines.

Last edited by alphaboi867; 02-07-2017 at 06:32 PM..
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  #89  
Old 02-07-2017, 07:12 PM
MLS MLS is offline
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Labor and delivery. Mom goes from zero to 1000 on the pain scale in 10 seconds flat and delivers a 6-month-old baby 5 minutes later.
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  #90  
Old 02-07-2017, 07:27 PM
D_Odds D_Odds is online now
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Originally Posted by alphaboi867 View Post
Actually in real life that person picking up the call on overnights is likely to be in India or the Philippines. The Operator from India is a well established Trope, but you rarely hear about the Philippines.
Which is a shame, because overall Filipinos have less of an accent and are more easily understood. Also, Filipinos are more apt to get Western cultural references, as they are big consumers of it.

Building on ivylass' post, it's not just chemo. Someone could be poisoned and half-past dead, but give them the antidote and they are competing in an Iron Man triathlon 5 minutes later.
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Old 02-07-2017, 09:08 PM
Hocus Pocus Hocus Pocus is offline
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Originally Posted by alphaboi867 View Post
Actually in real life that person picking up the call on overnights is likely to be in India
And their name is Bob.
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  #92  
Old 02-08-2017, 06:33 PM
Quercus alba Quercus alba is offline
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Originally Posted by Projammer View Post
re: HIPAA

I'll pretend I'm a script writer for a moment.

The suspect cut him/herself at the scene and left a sizeable blood sample. No DNA match as that would be too simple. However tests found traces of busparinacyl (a fictitious but familiar sounding prescription only drug). Our intrepid investigators then use that info to search some pharmaceutical database to find out everyone who has a prescription for it in their metro area which of course ultimately leads to the villain.

The first time that an agency tried that there's a whole alphabet soup of agencies that are going to come down on them like a ton of bricks.
Then there's the fact that in Real Life one doesn't simply send a sample to a lab and say "look for anything that could possibly be there" and get a convenient report.
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  #93  
Old 02-08-2017, 07:07 PM
chizzuk chizzuk is online now
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Doing the whole "Charge 360! Clear!" routine on a patient who has flatlined. Asystole is not a shockable rhythm. Also, the amount of people who survive after needing CPR in the middle of the sidewalk is like 2%, and it's not that much better in a hospital. Or their brain is totally gorked.

Also, hemophilia should never be used as a plot device because they always get it wrong. Hemophiliacs are in no real danger from superficial cuts. Inheritance has nothing to do with incest. Any injury is not a hopeless cause--there is medicine for it. But said medicine is not a bottle of pills that lies just out of reach as the person turns into a puddle of blood, it's IV infusion. And while women technically can have hemophilia, it's so rare as to be virtually nonexistent.
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  #94  
Old 02-09-2017, 12:11 AM
Shamozzle Shamozzle is offline
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Originally Posted by Dale Sams View Post
Maybe his heater is broken like in my car.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kimballkid View Post
I do it that way pretty much all the time. I hate wasting gas.
I'm curious, how cold does it get where you folks live?

Where I live, it gets colder than Genghis Khan's mother-in-law and only fools don't warm up their vehicles good and proper (not calling anyone here a fool), for the sake of the vehicle's happy parts.

So, you either sit in your vehicle and wait, dreaming of Antarctica, or you go back inside and watch YouTube videos for 10 or 15 minutes. If you're really clever you let the heat melt the ice on the windows for you.
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  #95  
Old 02-09-2017, 05:37 PM
Projammer Projammer is offline
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Bombs..

Scene: Hapless non-tech finds bomb set to go off in 5 minutes. Phone call to tech-expert back at HQ.

I found a bomb! How do I disarm it?!
Describe what you see.
There's a timer. And a circuit board. And 6 batteries on the right side!
Do you see a blue wire?
Yes!
Don't touch the blue wire. The bomb will detonate. Find the green wire.
Okay. Got it.
Cut that one.
*Cuts wire* Two seconds left on still timer.


So all villainous bomb makers use the same build guide? Or get the same do it yourself bomb kit from ACME? Why weren't those in the Heathkit catalog?
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  #96  
Old 02-09-2017, 06:07 PM
Morbo Morbo is offline
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"Well, Hello, kidnapped kid's father, this is the kidnapper. Hello to the Police listening...Ah haha!"

::Lead cops signal to the father to keep him talking, by dramatically pulling his hands apart::

"Now I shall hang up, seconds before your trace can be established. Ah haha!"

Tech cop: "We lost him!"


Calls have been traceable immediately since the mid-80s. Cell phones for about 11 years now.
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  #97  
Old 02-09-2017, 06:09 PM
Steve MB Steve MB is online now
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Originally Posted by Projammer View Post
So all villainous bomb makers use the same build guide? Or get the same do it yourself bomb kit from ACME? Why weren't those in the Heathkit catalog?
I remember the bit in Batman: Assault on Arkham where Batman is disarming the Joker's dirty bomb. Inside is a note: "Cut the red wire". All the wires are red.
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  #98  
Old 02-09-2017, 06:15 PM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Morbo View Post
"Well, Hello, kidnapped kid's father, this is the kidnapper. Hello to the Police listening...Ah haha!"

::Lead cops signal to the father to keep him talking, by dramatically pulling his hands apart::

"Now I shall hang up, seconds before your trace can be established. Ah haha!"

Tech cop: "We lost him!"


Calls have been traceable immediately since the mid-80s. Cell phones for about 11 years now.
what about now, in the age of SIP calling?
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  #99  
Old 02-09-2017, 06:20 PM
Maggie the Ocelot Maggie the Ocelot is offline
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Originally Posted by ivylass View Post

Cancer. With drugs these days, you do not spend hours after chemo vomiting. (Unless you're allergic to compazine, which a fellow BC survivor was ). Yes, you lose your hair...but for some reason, the eyebrows and eyelashes remain on the actor.
This trope caused me undue issue for my first 3 treatments. I thought that throwing up 5 times a day for several days after chemo was something I would just have to get used to...nope. Turns out there's drugs for that.

However - to slightly edit what ivylass said - not all chemo drugs cause hair loss - it depends on what drugs you're taking for what cancer. Breast cancer chemo pretty much always does, so does leukemia I think, but I've still got mine and my mom didn't lose hers from the treatment for cervical.
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  #100  
Old 02-09-2017, 10:43 PM
Gatopescado Gatopescado is offline
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What is the current going rate for Taint Oil these days?
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