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  #1  
Old 02-11-2017, 03:05 AM
Dr. Strangelove Dr. Strangelove is offline
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Pretentious cocktails

I've been invited to a pretentious cocktail party. While I have some ideas for my entry, I figured I'd poll for others. Results are judged on arbitrary criteria, but will presumably include taste, appearance, and pretentiousness.

Cocktails served on the rocks are ideal, since I can make use of my skills in the manufacture of clear ice. However, all possibilities will be considered.

So, got any favorites? I'm a fan of the Pisco Sour; the egg white gives it a texture that you generally don't find in alcoholic drinks.
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  #2  
Old 02-11-2017, 03:31 AM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is offline
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Well it sounds like hell to me but if you are determined to attend.....I'd suggest getting some gold leaf flakes and freezing them in your clear ice cubes.

After that......just do a standard cocktail but source every ingredient in an unnecessarily restrictive way and prepare it using unnecessarily arcane practices, the pretentiousness will follow.

You should of course prepare something called a "Golden Trumpet". The ideal cocktail for these troubled times. The exact ingredients vary but it should of course contain the unnecessary gold mentioned above, contain fake tequila, (very) bitters of some description, sour grape juice, be topped with a whisp of spun sugar and the taste must, of course, be bad.
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Old 02-11-2017, 04:00 AM
John Mace John Mace is offline
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Is the term "pretentious" being used unironically?
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Old 02-11-2017, 06:30 AM
kayaker kayaker is online now
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Gotta love doing pickle backs. A shot of cheap whiskey (or whisky, or even wiski) followed immediately with a shot of pickle juice. Mmmmmmmmm.

Miraculously, you do not taste the whiskey. Also, first time pickle backers always laugh after doing the shots.
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Old 02-11-2017, 06:51 AM
Baker Baker is offline
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I remember a drink that a friend made, called a Gilligan's Island. Problem is I don't remember ALL the ingredients. Goldschlagger for the Howell's, Captain Morgan for the Skipper, a cherry in the drink for Mary Ann. But I don't remember what ingredients represented the Professor or Ginger. You could make something up.

And I think the idea mentioned above, of gold flakes in clear ice, sounds way cool.
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  #6  
Old 02-11-2017, 07:00 AM
Bill Door Bill Door is offline
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Here's a link to a peppercorn cocktail.

Black Pepper Simple Syrup
1/4 cup whole black peppercorns
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 cup water
1 cup granulated sugar

The Peppered Poire Cocktail
1 ounce gin
1/2 ounce Poire William or similar pear-flavored liqueur
1/4 ounce fresh Bartlett pear puree
1/2 ounce black pepper simple syrup
Sparkling wine

There's a line in The Magic Christian "In the Bernaise, the peppercorns were bruised merely by dropping them." I've been looking for 50 years for a chance to use that line. That'll pretentious up any beverage.

Last edited by Bill Door; 02-11-2017 at 07:01 AM..
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  #7  
Old 02-11-2017, 07:25 AM
6ImpossibleThingsB4Breakfast 6ImpossibleThingsB4Breakfast is offline
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Pretention factor will be greatly increased I think, Dr Strangelove, if you slow freeze a large block of ice and chip it in front of your pretentious guests. Or clients. Or competitors. Or whatever they are.

Slow freezing stops bubbles forming anywhere but on the top or the sides - so you get a nice, crystal clear block. Gotta agree with Baker - the gold leaf flakes Novelty Bobble suggests is a brilliant idea. It's also a harder ice, so it won't dilute your wondrous concoction so quickly.

Personally, I love espresso martinis. If I'm gonna be pissed, I want to stay awake and not miss a moment of my own hilarity. Pretentious coffee, coffee liquor and vodka on gold leaf rocks..served in a brandy balloon. Grandiose, overblown, and great for the massively affected.
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Old 02-11-2017, 07:28 AM
elbows elbows is online now
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The most pretentious cocktail to make and serve is the Pousse Café, in my opinion.

It requires a lot of expensive liqueurs, a thorough knowledge of their specific gravities, and a very steady hand to achieve. Practice is essential!

It's time consuming to produce, very pretty to look at, and not that pleasant to drink!

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/fo...-no-1-51167400
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Old 02-11-2017, 08:44 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elbows View Post
The most pretentious cocktail to make and serve is the Pousse Café, in my opinion.

It requires a lot of expensive liqueurs, a thorough knowledge of their specific gravities, and a very steady hand to achieve. Practice is essential!

It's time consuming to produce, very pretty to look at, and not that pleasant to drink!

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/fo...-no-1-51167400
Most of those ingredients aren't expensive (or at least not more expensive than a standard fifth of something), except maybe the yellow chartreuse, which goes for about $55 a bottle here. Creme de violette is a bit difficult to find, but should only run about $30. Good stuff to have around to the stock the bar! The violette can be used also in the classic aviation cocktail.

Also, as far as egg whites go, you'll find a lot of old timey recipes have egg whites in the cocktail, particularly, sours of any kind.

Last edited by pulykamell; 02-11-2017 at 08:47 AM..
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  #10  
Old 02-11-2017, 08:48 AM
elbows elbows is online now
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Even off brands, six to seven liqueurs for a tiny little beverage is still spendy, in my opinion. Use all top shelf brands and it would get truly dear. Plus, it's not stuff one is likely have on hand, for most people, I think.
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  #11  
Old 02-11-2017, 08:55 AM
madmonk28 madmonk28 is offline
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I'm not sure what a pretentious cocktail is. I make pisco sours at home when I have pisco on hand.

You could make the Soiled Kimono, the recipe is given in S1 of SNL and the drink is ordered by Mia Rudolph on A Very Murray Christmas:

2/3 French Champagne
1/3 Plum Saki, and topped of with a paper butterfly. out there heard of this drink? Maybe it was just made up for the show.
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  #12  
Old 02-11-2017, 09:04 AM
Bridget Burke Bridget Burke is offline
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Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
Is the term "pretentious" being used unironically?
Sounds weird to me. I patronize a couple of bars downtown that are proud of their artisanal cocktails. Some produce their own ice, create their own bitters, etc., and pride themselves on stocking obscure liquors. (Although they aren't above Old Overholt Rye.)

But they aren't pretentious bars, at all. Well, one got a bit of razzing for creating Jello Shots for the Superbowl crowd. But they were really good jello shots....

(Hey, Pretentious Jello Shots might be an idea.)

Last edited by Bridget Burke; 02-11-2017 at 09:05 AM..
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  #13  
Old 02-11-2017, 09:09 AM
Celyn Celyn is offline
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Originally Posted by Dr. Strangelove View Post
I've been invited to a pretentious cocktail party. While I have some ideas for my entry, I figured I'd poll for others. Results are judged on arbitrary criteria, but will presumably include taste, appearance, and pretentiousness...
So, it's a joke and fun thing, involving the most pseud cocktail that you can think of?

You know, rather than a party in which many people who are attending like pretentious drinks?

I suppose a Pan Galactic Gargle Blaster would not qualify at all?
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  #14  
Old 02-11-2017, 09:34 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by elbows View Post
Even off brands, six to seven liqueurs for a tiny little beverage is still spendy, in my opinion. Use all top shelf brands and it would get truly dear. Plus, it's not stuff one is likely have on hand, for most people, I think.
True, except for the brandy, grenadine (which is just a syrup, not a liqueur) and possibly creme-de-menthe, most well-stocked bars are not going to have all of that on hand. We happen to have chartreuse, both green and yellow, but that's because my dad loves chartreuse. At any rate, I wouldn't buy all that stuff just for one cocktail, but all those make a nice addition to a well-stocked bar and class it up! I've been meaning to get a bottle of creme de violette for the longest time now, and keep forgetting about it when I'm at the liquor store. Maybe this'll inspire me to remember.
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Old 02-11-2017, 09:36 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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If you want to get pretentious, make some cocktail with bitters in it, but make your own bitters and point out at every chance you get the fine ingredients in your cocktail, including the addition of your homemade bitters that you found the recipe in an 18th century cookbook, or some bullshit like that. (And I do have some recipes somewhere from an old cookbook of that vintage for bitters, but it'll take some time beforehand to make them and sourcing of obscure roots and tree barks and stuff like that. The internet, luckily, makes that pretty easy these days.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 02-11-2017 at 09:38 AM..
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  #16  
Old 02-11-2017, 09:53 AM
Celyn Celyn is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
If you want to get pretentious, make some cocktail with bitters in it, but make your own bitters and point out at every chance you get the fine ingredients in your cocktail, including the addition of your homemade bitters that you found the recipe in an 18th century cookbook, or some bullshit like that. ...
A secret family cookbook! Only known copy in existence! Made by your great-great-really-rather good-chap-great uncle who was head chef to the Queen of Ruritania.
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Old 02-11-2017, 09:59 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Celyn View Post
A secret family cookbook! Only known copy in existence! Made by your great-great-really-rather good-chap-great uncle who was head chef to the Queen of Ruritania.
Actually, my dad does have a Polish family recipe for a bitter/liqueur that somewhat resembles either chartreuse or benedictine (but not on a brandy base.) Maybe the OP can barter with me for it or defeat me in a game of skill (or chance) and add to the lore of the cocktail.
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Old 02-11-2017, 10:01 AM
Lemur866 Lemur866 is offline
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Serve in glasses made of molded ice.

It's a fine line between pretentious and ridiculous.
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Old 02-11-2017, 10:05 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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But a more serious answer:

Look through this thread. The guy answering the questions and giving the recipes is Toby Maloney, head mixologist at the Violet Hour, a well-known Chicago spot for top-shelf cocktails. The place is a bit hipstery and perhaps pretentious (it's a "speakeasy," so you have to know where the "secret" entrance is to get inside), but it is a very welcoming place with reasonably priced cocktails that are delicious. And I'm not really much of a cocktail drinker, preferring my booze in its natural state.

Anyhow, lots of recipes for great cocktails there, with all the exact specs as he gives his bartenders. That's a great place to look for ideas.
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Old 02-11-2017, 10:21 AM
Celyn Celyn is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Actually, my dad does have a Polish family recipe for a bitter/liqueur that somewhat resembles either chartreuse or benedictine (but not on a brandy base.) Maybe the OP can barter with me for it or defeat me in a game of skill (or chance) and add to the lore of the cocktail.
(bolding mine)

YES! Cocktails at dawn.Oh yes!
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  #21  
Old 02-11-2017, 10:24 AM
kayaker kayaker is online now
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Originally Posted by Lemur866 View Post
Serve in glasses made of molded ice.

It's a fine line between pretentious and ridiculous.
My brother sent me a picture from Finland. He was in an "ice bar".
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  #22  
Old 02-11-2017, 10:35 AM
John Mace John Mace is offline
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Originally Posted by Bridget Burke View Post
Sounds weird to me. I patronize a couple of bars downtown that are proud of their artisanal cocktails. Some produce their own ice, create their own bitters, etc., and pride themselves on stocking obscure liquors. (Although they aren't above Old Overholt Rye.)

But they aren't pretentious bars, at all. Well, one got a bit of razzing for creating Jello Shots for the Superbowl crowd. But they were really good jello shots....

(Hey, Pretentious Jello Shots might be an idea.)
Yeah, the whole "artisanal cocktail" thing is all the rage. I've been to a few of these bars, and I'm not much of a cocktail guy but I found them to be an interesting change of pace. I'm mostly a wine drinker.

But I couldn't tell from the OP if the folks throwing the party called it "pretentious" and were looking for joke drinks, or if the OP was just characterizing it as "pretentious" and the host was serious about wanting folks to bring clever cocktail variations.
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  #23  
Old 02-11-2017, 11:05 AM
eunoia eunoia is offline
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As pulykamell suggests, definitely something with obscure homemade bitters, so we're talking a whisky cocktail.

Start with muddled jabuticaba. For heaven's sake not over-muddled jabuticaba! Practice an imperious sneer if anyone else even attempts to muddle.

Plenty of whiskies to choose from but I'll suggest George Dickel Rye Whiskey. Affordable, suitably obscure. Go nuts on the pronunciation of Dickel. Points for getting others to break character and giggle. Anybody who mentions a finer rye like Sazerac for a mixed drink is the epitome of gauche. Conversely, even the most expensive single barrel bourbon is "insufferably low-rent".

Make a sugar syrup from organic turbinado sugar. Try to mention "organic turbinado sugar" at least thrice. Stir thrice. Say "thrice" a lot.

Amaro is so chic right now and goes great with whisky cocktails. Something like Amaro Silano, and since you're designing an original, you're free to name the cocktail and expound on its origins in the pre-war Calabrese underworld.

Finish with a twist of buddha’s hand and voilà!
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  #24  
Old 02-11-2017, 11:17 AM
kayaker kayaker is online now
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Originally Posted by eunoia View Post
Start with muddled jabuticaba.
What is your choice of muddler, though? I've heard that only a well-used muddler, one that has muddled for decades, if not centuries, is the only true way to muddle. I search estate sales for well-used muddlers, but the prices are ridiculous. That's why I contact people directly in attempt to cut out the muddle middle man.
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  #25  
Old 02-11-2017, 12:35 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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My grocery store has Ocean Spray Cranberry Cocktail, ande Libby's Fruit Cocktail. They are not very pretentious.
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  #26  
Old 02-11-2017, 01:42 PM
Dr. Strangelove Dr. Strangelove is offline
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But they aren't pretentious bars, at all.
The thread is about pretentious cocktails, not pretentious bars. But to be clear: anything that can be described as artisanal pegs out the pretentiousness meter. I mean, the meter explodes in a flurry of glass and bronze shards, and the needle lodges itself in the finely-groomed beard of a nearby hipster.

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
Is the term "pretentious" being used unironically?
It is in a quantum superposition of ironic and unironic. On one hand, it's done with full self-awareness. But on the other hand, people are excepted to make an effort. Old recipes, specialized liqueurs, unusual ingredients, complex methods of preparation, and so on all presumably win points. And it should taste good in the end.

Thanks all for the suggestions. I am already on the ball regarding clear ice; it's one of my specialties. Homemade bitters sounds awesome, but I'm not sure I have the time... it's about a week away.
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Old 02-11-2017, 04:14 PM
eunoia eunoia is offline
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What is your choice of muddler, though? I've heard that only a well-used muddler, one that has muddled for decades, if not centuries, is the only true way to muddle. I search estate sales for well-used muddlers, but the prices are ridiculous. That's why I contact people directly in attempt to cut out the muddle middle man.
An excellent point. For extraction of mint oils I use a high silver content 18th-century French apothecary spoon in the Mazagran style purchased from the estate of a descendant of Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier's executioner. Of course this would not be the proper implement for the jabuticaba where less finesse and a rougher hand would be warranted. For this I have lathed my own muddler from an unvarnished blackthorn policeman's nightstick that was itself fashioned from a shillelagh my great-great-great grandfather won in a drinking competition.
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Old 02-11-2017, 05:36 PM
Green Bean Green Bean is offline
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You should simply ask for a Pappy Van Winkle, neat.
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Old 02-11-2017, 05:50 PM
amarinth amarinth is offline
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Upscale jello shots (examples: here).
Because you can take the pretension of a perfect manhattan and up it by "ironically" turning it into a frathouse staple.
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Old 02-11-2017, 06:04 PM
Ludovic Ludovic is online now
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But I don't remember what ingredients represented the Professor or Ginger.
Hmmm, if only there were a food item that sounded similar to ginger....
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  #31  
Old 02-11-2017, 07:51 PM
Dr_Paprika Dr_Paprika is offline
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I am surprised how popular artisan cocktails have become.

Surely you could add spices to rum, gin or vodka. And saffron is expensive and gives a lovely yellow colour. And what goes well with saffron? Rice, butter, seafood... Gentleman, I give you... The Potable Paella.

1 lobster claw
1 jumbo shrimp, cooked
1 clam, steamed
1.5 oz sake
0.5 oz homemade saffron vodka
0.5 oz Dr. Pepper
1 pink peppercorn
1 sprig green onion
2 ice cubes with gold flakes or silver dragees
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  #32  
Old 02-11-2017, 07:54 PM
Wallaby Wallaby is offline
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Cocktail names are the best.

'I'd like a long, slow, comfortable single-entendre, please, bartender'.
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  #33  
Old 02-11-2017, 09:00 PM
Hilarity N. Suze Hilarity N. Suze is offline
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...

Finish with a twist of buddha’s hand and voilà!
I had never heard of Buddha's hand before last week. And...here it is again.
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  #34  
Old 02-11-2017, 09:05 PM
bump bump is offline
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The most pretentious cocktail to make and serve is the Pousse Café, in my opinion.
Nah, probably something more like Dale DeGroff's "Flame of Love", where the main attraction is the theatrical aspect from flaming something like half a dozen orange peels into the drink (too lazy to actually look it up.)

But the thing is, what makes for a pretentious cocktail? Plenty of cocktail books will call out specific spirits, but the drink is hardly going to be irretrievably maimed if you use another spirit in the same category. For example, there's a cocktail book I have with a drink that calls out Woodford Reserve bourbon. It's still pretty damned good if you make it with Evan Williams.

That said, I tend to think the ones that are trying to show off wealth or that have some cheesy theatrics are the ones that have the most pretense. For example, if you go into a bar and order a vodka and tonic, that's cool. But if you douchebag out and order a Gray Goose with Q Tonic, that's pretentious and probably deserves a punch to the crotch.
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Old 02-11-2017, 09:56 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by bump View Post
For example, if you go into a bar and order a vodka and tonic, that's cool. But if you douchebag out and order a Gray Goose with Q Tonic, that's pretentious and probably deserves a punch to the crotch.
I've never heard anyone call out the brand of the mixer (it's rather doubtful they stock multiple brands of tonic), but calling the liquor is perfectly normal, especially since the bartender will either ask you your preference (if he wants to upsell a bit), or (more usually) simply just give you the well liquor. That said, if I knew a bar had several kinds of mixer and I had a preference, I wouldn't see any problem in calling the specific liquor and mixer and wouldn't see it as pretentious at all (although, like I said, I'm not a cocktail drinker.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 02-11-2017 at 10:01 PM..
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  #36  
Old 02-11-2017, 10:04 PM
snfaulkner snfaulkner is offline
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-I'd like a single plum floating in perfume. Floating in a man's hat.

-here you go.
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Old 02-11-2017, 10:06 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Actually, come to think of it, I did go through a gimlet phase a few summers ago, and at one bar I did call it as Bombay (not the Sapphire) gimlet with half of their lime mix and half Rose's or just all Rose's. (They typically made their gimlets with fresh lime juice & simple syrup, but I just have an affinity for Rose's in this particular drink that it doesn't taste right to me unless it has some Rose's in it.) So, maybe I am the pretentious douchebag, but the bartender was always happy to accommodate me. He didn't really care because it was all premixed stuff, anyway, he just has to grab a different bottle or one extra bottle. It never even occurred to me to think of it as pretentious, as I was just there by myself after work, not trying to impress anyone.

Last edited by pulykamell; 02-11-2017 at 10:07 PM..
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  #38  
Old 02-11-2017, 10:08 PM
Chimera Chimera is offline
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An excellent point. For extraction of mint oils I use a high silver content 18th-century French apothecary spoon in the Mazagran style purchased from the estate of a descendant of Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier's executioner. Of course this would not be the proper implement for the jabuticaba where less finesse and a rougher hand would be warranted. For this I have lathed my own muddler from an unvarnished blackthorn policeman's nightstick that was itself fashioned from a shillelagh my great-great-great grandfather won in a drinking competition.
And here I've been wasting my fragment of the True Cross on healing the sick.
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  #39  
Old 02-12-2017, 02:03 AM
Dr_Paprika Dr_Paprika is offline
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In my hometown, where bartenders can occasionally be lazy, anything other than a beer can be pretentious. I was once informed a Rusty Nail was a pretentious drink.
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  #40  
Old 02-12-2017, 02:22 AM
sitchensis sitchensis is offline
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I really like pretentious drinks. Love to think about the history or thought involved. It's a lot better then drinking sour beer to be cool. If you want to make a pretentious drink, think herbs, basil, sage, rosemary. Put some fresh herbs in a whip cream dispenser and go crazy with herb foam.
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  #41  
Old 02-12-2017, 03:20 AM
snfaulkner snfaulkner is offline
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-I'd like a single plum floating in perfume. Floating in a man's hat.

-here you go.
Bah! SERVED in a man's hat. Not sure how I managed to mangle that.
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  #42  
Old 02-12-2017, 04:05 AM
6ImpossibleThingsB4Breakfast 6ImpossibleThingsB4Breakfast is offline
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To serve a man's single plum floating in a perfumed hat would take some balls.
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  #43  
Old 02-12-2017, 05:21 AM
madmonk28 madmonk28 is offline
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I think where pretentious enters in to food is when the ingredients don't actually improve the quality. Some of the small batch whiskies meet this requirement, they're not very good, but they cost more than a bottle of mass produced, but well made whiskies.

Currently, I think some of the most pretentious libations on the market are IPAs. There are lots and lots of really bad IPAs out there with no flavor except bitter. You can tell that they thought up the quirky name and designed the label before they even learned how to brew. Beers have become more pretentious and ridiculous than wines, which have become more accessible.

For something to be truly pretentious, I think the consumer has to be ignorant of what quality means. Using that as a benchmark, I think cocktails using high-end vodka fit the bill. There comes a point where vodka is vodka and that point is well below the price point for Grey Goose, etc.
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  #44  
Old 02-12-2017, 10:20 AM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
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Ah HA!

The light finally dawned at about post #35. Here I was, thinking to myself "If the cocktail party is pretentious, how can the OP be contemplating bringing ice? Guests at pretentious parties are hardly encouraged to bring their own ice, or anything else, for that matter, except their best manners, their most vivacious dispositions, and the most sparkling conversation they can manage to dig up."

Finally, the penny dropped, and I realized that "pretentious" was intended to modify "cocktail," rather than "party."

So now I have no ideas to offer, because somebody ninja'd me on the pousse-cafe. I'm no so easily stymied, though, so here's my idea: do the pousse-cafe, but just mix the liqueurs in a bottle before you arrive, and tell everyone that it's a bottle of pousse-cafes. Pass it around; let everyone have a snort.

If you want to go through all the work, make the bottle of pousse-cafes (is that right? Or should it be pousses-cafe?) at your host's bar, in layers, let everyone admire it, then pass it around.

Oh, and wear a monocle.
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  #45  
Old 02-12-2017, 10:30 AM
Chimera Chimera is offline
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Originally Posted by kaylasdad99 View Post
Oh, and wear a monocle.
https://singleusemonocles.com/

Why yes, I bought a pack when they first came out.
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  #46  
Old 02-12-2017, 03:04 PM
Bad News Baboon Bad News Baboon is offline
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And then after all the hand-chipping of ice, pouring of artisanal bitters, etc, serve it Amuse-Bouche style. Maybe a beat up enamel soup spoon. Top with garnish.
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  #47  
Old 02-12-2017, 04:48 PM
snfaulkner snfaulkner is offline
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I'd like all of your best boxed wines mixed together in a bucket.
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  #48  
Old 02-12-2017, 05:37 PM
beowulff beowulff is online now
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
My grocery store has Ocean Spray Cranberry Cocktail, ande Libby's Fruit Cocktail. They are not very pretentious.
This is why you are not invited.
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  #49  
Old 02-12-2017, 06:34 PM
Dr. Strangelove Dr. Strangelove is offline
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Originally Posted by kaylasdad99 View Post
Finally, the penny dropped, and I realized that "pretentious" was intended to modify "cocktail," rather than "party."
This is my fault. Not that I'd ever intentionally leave things ambiguous to sow confusion, of course, but sometimes my desire for fun causes me to underestimate the possibility of a misreading.

In fact, the host specified: "This is a '(pretentious cocktail) party', not a 'pretentious (cocktail party)'". Well, it might also be the latter, but that's not the primary goal.

A monocle is a fantastic idea.
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Old 02-12-2017, 08:06 PM
Dangerosa Dangerosa is offline
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Originally Posted by elbows View Post
Even off brands, six to seven liqueurs for a tiny little beverage is still spendy, in my opinion. Use all top shelf brands and it would get truly dear. Plus, it's not stuff one is likely have on hand, for most people, I think.
If you drink Aviations (which is a pretentious cocktail, and one of my standards - I like purple, and it matches most of my outfits - a girl's drink should always match her shoes - and I have the prettiest pair of purple pumps) the creme de violette (there are three brands in the local liquor store - it used to be obscure) and maraschino are already in your cabinet. Creme de Menthe is needed for Grasshoppers (doesn't everyone drink grasshoppers at Christmas?) and grenadine is standard. I would have to buy the chartrusse.

However, that cocktail would taste like crap. Blech.

My favorite right now is a drink invented by the guys at Tattersalls. http://tattersalldistilling.com/gin-vodka-aquavit/
They call it a Baysider. Its aquavit, habenaro bitters, mint simple syrup, clarified lime juice and sale. Its pretty pretentious.
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