#1  
Old 09-04-2017, 11:35 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Moving. Got Any Advice?

We found ourselves a smaller place: across town - a three-bedroom/2 bath apartment with lots of amenities that the previous tenant left for us.

This house has gotten too big for us and harbors too many memories of our late son (6.3.2017).

"She Who Must Be Obeyed"* has begun kicking my sorry ass out of bed at the ungawdly hour of 10 am, to begin gathering small items and we will leave the large items for last when we'll have some strong muscles and backs to take those over.

Any other tips for one slightly demented 67 year old and one beautiful 68 year old woman, both of whom do not need to do heavy lifting nor too much moving in one day?

Thanks Very Much

Q

* From the BBC's "Rumpole Of The Bailey"
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Last edited by Quasimodem; 09-04-2017 at 11:35 PM.
  #2  
Old 09-05-2017, 12:34 AM
galen ubal galen ubal is offline
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After moving by myself and with family more than 15 times in my 51 years...hire professional movers, if you can at all afford it. Seriously, moving is a pain, and I know I've gotten too old for that shit.

If you must do it mostly yourselves, get more boxes than you think you'll need, along with tape and padding. Plan out what you can pack up early, and what must go on the last trip.

Get rid of everything you can - donate, sell, trash. Look at this as a chance to simplify your life of some of the stuff you've accumulated over however many years.

More as I think of it.
  #3  
Old 09-05-2017, 12:46 AM
cochrane cochrane is offline
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I don't have any moving advice, Bill, but I'm sorry to hear about your son.
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Old 09-05-2017, 01:12 AM
Shalmanese Shalmanese is offline
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Are you moving yourselves or hiring people?

Here's some advice I've gathered over the years:

* Measure out the major dimensions of all of your furniture, then get a giant roll of butcher's paper and cut out stencils of each piece. Go to the new house and lay out the furniture. Figure out what goes where and what you want to keep and what you want to get rid of. Once you're agreed, keep the stencil's in place. Write down the list of furniture from furthest to the front door to nearest to the front door. Have the movers load your furniture onto the truck in roughly reverse of that order. When it comes time to move the furniture, remove the stencils right before the movers set down the piece. That way, you're not moving something twice.

* Rent a skip for your old place a few days before the move. Everything goes into 3 piles, keep, donate, trash. Be ruthless about culling. Moving is the best time to slim down on stuff. If you haven't used something in a year and it's something you could buy in less than a week, then strongly consider tossing it. Having a skip means you have the freedom to throw out whatever you need without worrying about running out of garbage space.

* Use the move as an excuse to buy new stuff. Did you buy something that you've been mildly annoyed by or was a grade below what you should have gotten but it's still working just well enough to not need replacing yet? A move is a great time to finally do that upgrade (although don't go overboard, obviously).

* Have more boxes than you think you should need. Have more padding material than you think you should need. Fill boxes based on weight, not to the brim.

* Make a plan for how you're going to deal with trash at the new place for the first month. There's going to be a lot of packing material and general detritus and it's not all going to fit into the weekly trash pickup. Hoarding trash for a month, letting it go in drips and drabs every week sucks. Don't end up like that.

* Collect a minimal set of cleaning supplies (vacuum, broom, mop, sponges, cleaning chemicals etc.) and tools (hammer, drill, screwdriver, utility knife, saw etc.) keep them with you in the car, not on the moving truck. They should be the first things moved into the new house and, if you can, try to get multiples of each because you're going to spend your first few days constantly searching for them.

* If you have any decorative arrangements or other intricate array of small items, take photos of them, print them out and stick them on the walls above your stencils in your new home. When you get to the new place, you can use it as a reference to get stuff back to the way it used to look.

* Moving's also a great time to adopt new organizational systems. Do that in the new place before the day of the actual move. Install any racks, cabinets, hangers or drawers beforehand so stuff can go directly into them.

The goal is to get the house into a livable state as rapidly and painlessly as possible. People only have limited mental energy for big projects and when it stalls out, a project can stall indefinitely. You're much more able to have the mental motivation to do something before the move rather than when you're also physically exhausted by the move so do as much planning up front as possible so that the move will be, as much as possible, just slotting objects into preassigned slots.
  #5  
Old 09-05-2017, 02:51 AM
Tastes of Chocolate Tastes of Chocolate is offline
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Pack a box with sheets, towels, wash cloths, toilet paper and paper towels. Keep it handy, and not with the rest of the stuff you are moving. At the end of the day, a shower and a bed with clean sheets will seem like heaven.

If you use someone to pack and unpack your house, offer to buy them pizzas for lunch. I've used movers twice, and did this both times. I've had zero problems with the moves, and there seemed to be extra care taken with my stuff.

If you have stuff that you are keeping/moving, but won't need right away, consider leaving those boxes in the garage at first. Having less stuff to move around each room will make it much easier to get re-set up, and the winter coats won't mind sitting in the garage for a month or so.
  #6  
Old 09-05-2017, 02:53 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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Throw everything away. Replace it at the new home, with yard-sale and thrift shop purchases.
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Old 09-05-2017, 03:14 AM
galen ubal galen ubal is offline
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If you've got lots of books, buy smaller boxes - books are very heavy.
Invest in a good quality two-wheel dolly - something with larger, pneumatic tires. Spend a little extra and you'll get something a lot easier to move around.
If you rent a truck, check it out before you drive it off. Make sure the ramp works properly, etc. Get some cheap rope to secure loads to the tie-downs that are usually within. Within reason, too big is better than too small.

I don't know if I agree with Tastes of Chocolate, to be honest. I've found it better to put everything away, as stuff left in the garage often stays there. YMMV.
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Old 09-05-2017, 03:36 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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We're moving ourselves. The new place is about two miles away from here. We won't have a garage and one parking space will have to do us. Most of the folks will be volunteers as we can't afford to hire a moving service. There's a young guy, who has been our "Go-To" person for mowing the lawn cleaning the roof, etc. who will be paid, as he will be the one to dismantle/remantle our computers and TV's. Other than that, until later in the month it's just gonna be the both of us and little stuff. I have to keep a close eye on Dondra since she tends to overdo and then gets dizzy.

We will be having a moving sale on a couple of Saturdays as we are actually moving. One of Dondra's nieces will be here to help with that.

I really appreciate all the tips, my friends.

One thing I have already learned is "Never say never" , as in, "Okay we're here and we're never moving again!"

Thanks

Quasi
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  #9  
Old 09-05-2017, 05:53 AM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by galen ubal View Post
If you've got lots of books, buy smaller boxes - books are very heavy.
Liquor stores are a great resource for obtaining smaller, strong (and free) boxes.

As long as you don't care what the new neighbors think when they see the empty Jim Beam cases piled up in your trash.

Good luck!


mmm
  #10  
Old 09-05-2017, 07:24 AM
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Buy each other two or three small trinkets as gifts. Then chuck them into random boxes as you pack up.

Trust me, you'll enjoy unpacking a lot more. Moving sucks LARGE, unexpected tiny trinket gifts makes the worst part, "Oh my God, we've already done so much, why can't it just be done?", a little easier to bear. And always puts a smile on your face, when you're the most worn down and need it most!

It's a small thing that will make a big difference. Anything that makes you smile during the unpacking is a great thing!

Good Luck in your new place!
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Old 09-05-2017, 07:33 AM
minlokwat minlokwat is offline
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You might want to invest in some hump straps. It doesn't sound like you're moving any large appliances (washers, dryers and such) but they still might save some wear and tear on your back schlepping heavy boxes hither and yon.

Your local Home Depot should sell them. They're good to have around the house just in case and youtube has a number of tutorial videos on how to use them.

Good luck.
  #12  
Old 09-05-2017, 07:47 AM
FairyChatMom FairyChatMom is offline
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I have no advice, but I do want to say good luck and don't overdo it! Sometimes you don't remember that you're not 20 any longer, till your back reminds you.

We are determined that when we move from this house, it'll involve someone wheeling us out, but, yeah, never say never.
  #13  
Old 09-05-2017, 07:48 AM
sandra_nz sandra_nz is offline
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For our last move, we hired movers to pack as well as move. It was only a few hundred more than move-only and worth every damned penny.

Hope your move goes smoothly!
  #14  
Old 09-05-2017, 08:37 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandra_nz View Post
Hope your move goes smoothly!
So to speak?

I really like the trinket idea and we are going to implement that sometime this week. Thanks elbows.

FCM, I have a back brace which I will wear today. Thanks for the reminder!

We DO have a washer, dryer and portable dishwasher (which we would really like to sell - with only the two of us, the dishes are just usually washed in the sink).

MMM going to the liquor store today for boxes.

Minlokwat , thanks. I will follow up on the straps.

Thanks

Quasi/Bill

Last edited by Quasimodem; 09-05-2017 at 08:41 AM.
  #15  
Old 09-05-2017, 08:43 AM
CheshireKat CheshireKat is offline
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I think moving across town is worse than a cross-country move it seems to go on forever! My suggestion is to buy some cheap laundry baskets and pack them with unbreakable items (like pots and pans, towels and sheets, etc.). Drive them over and put them away. I have even done this with dishes using my dish towels for cushioning. I found the baskets much easier to lift and carry, since they have handles.

When my daughter moved across town she put all her clothes and linens in large trash bags (just watch the weight). The bonus was that after the move they were re-used for garbage, cutting down on the number of boxes to dispose.

Good luck on your move!
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Old 09-05-2017, 11:26 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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I forgot to add something and it's a major thing - sort of.

A year and a half ago, my wife had a stroke - not a debilitating one, it affected mainly her eyesight, but the doctor called it a "developing" stroke. THAT makes it major. I also don't let her out of my sight. She can still drive - she won't let me, since I caused a three car accident in 2011, So basically we're always together and we're all each other has - we are co-caretakers, I guess.

I will let her load boxes with little things, but I will not let her carry them to the car.

This what we're doing right now: little things, in little boxes, transported in the little car.
  #17  
Old 09-05-2017, 12:43 PM
gotpasswords gotpasswords is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CheshireKat
I think moving across town is worse than a cross-country move it seems to go on forever! ... When my daughter moved across town she put all her clothes and linens in large trash bags (just watch the weight)...
If you're hiring professional movers, don't use bags or laundry baskets - the movers won't touch them. Or, they'll box up your bags and baskets using their rather overpriced boxes and tape.

Local moves do go on forever because you have that ability to start moving stuff over just as soon as you sign the lease, and any leftovers can be dealt with when you go back to clean the old place. On a long-distance move, you can't start shuffling your christmas dishes and grandma's crystal over one carload at a time - it's all got to be ready on truck day.
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Old 09-05-2017, 01:16 PM
CheshireKat CheshireKat is offline
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The OP said he was moving himself, which is why I suggested the laundry baskets and leaf bags. I certainly wouldn't recommend them when using a professional mover!
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Old 09-05-2017, 02:06 PM
BeeGee BeeGee is offline
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I'm moving across the complex at the end of the month. My plan is to take over the bathroom supplies one evening and get that completely set up. The next evening after work, I plan on moving everything in the kitchen cabinets and drawers. The next night, I'll carry over my clothes and the other stuff and set up my closets. then I'll have someone come and move the furniture and boxed stuff. But there's a lot to be said for being able to find your clothes hanging up, being able to make a sandwich, and being able to take a shower without having to find the stuff first.
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Old 09-05-2017, 02:11 PM
Channing Idaho Banks Channing Idaho Banks is online now
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Save money on tape and glue the box bottoms with white glue.
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Old 09-05-2017, 02:54 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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So sorry to hear about your son Quasi. My sincere condolences to you and your family.

I second the advice to use professional movers. An across town move should be quick and easy. Give yourself some extra days if you can before or after the big move to carry your most treasured and personal possessions yourself or with the help of friends, and to get the old place cleaned up without rushing. The movers can do most of the packing if you can afford a little extra.

I dread moving again. Even if I won the lottery I'd buy a mansion somewhere else for all my new stuff and keep living here with my old stuff just so I wouldn't have to move. I'm putting a large addition on my house right now, once it's done we'll move in there and refurb the old house, and I don't even like the idea of moving all our stuff into from one side to the other when it's done.
  #22  
Old 09-05-2017, 03:59 PM
Urbanredneck Urbanredneck is offline
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I don't do boxes.

I went to WalMart and bought dozens of those large tubs or when they are on sale. They hold up better than boxes, stack better, are somewhat water and rodent proof, are just as cheap as the boxes you buy at Uhaul, and when your done with them, stack them inside each other and store them in your attic for the next move.

Finally, please share any stories of finding things you thought you lost years ago.
  #23  
Old 09-05-2017, 04:12 PM
TubaDiva TubaDiva is offline
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Second on this is a good opportunity to pare down.

Your idea of a couple of weekend sales is a good idea. Remember that you can put ads here in Marketplace, though of course local sales are easier than selling stuff on the internet. And there's also ebay as well, so you can start selling stuff right away.

If you have a lot of stuff and really want to seriously get down to simple stuff I know a woman who does estate sales for a business -- I can put you in touch with her if you like. Of course there would be a fee involved but just having one ginormous sale like that might be an easier way out for you. She has quite a following and would generate publicity and sales just by handling this for you. I talked to her recently about doing this for folks I know who are now in assisted living and need to clean out their house prior to sale and she told me "As you start to clear the house don't throw anything out; you'd be surprised what people buy" She would know, she sells it! Just a thought.

Don't be hesitant to ask for local help -- neighbors, friends, members of your church (if you're a churchgoer). Let people help you if they're willing to be there on your behalf.

Good luck, dear Quasi, and all best to you and yours, always. I'm very sad to hear you have suffered a loss, my condolences to you and your family.
  #24  
Old 09-05-2017, 04:48 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
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If people are helping you, make sure they don't "help" by putting away dishes for you, unless they know exactly where you want them to be. Otherwise, you'll have to find things and move them again. (This happened to a relative.)

My condolences on your son.
  #25  
Old 09-05-2017, 08:52 PM
gotpasswords gotpasswords is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dendarii Dame
If people are helping you, make sure they don't "help" by putting away dishes for you, unless they know exactly where you want them to be.
I got bamboozled on the front side of this. A friend came by to help, and I was a bit pained to discover a dozen boxes labeled "KITCHEN" - no idea if the contents were coffee mugs, utensils, or canned corn.
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Old 09-05-2017, 09:03 PM
purplehearingaid purplehearingaid is offline
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Old 09-05-2017, 10:06 PM
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I was messing around when packing boxes and giving my future self an idea of contents by writing on them. So I wrote important documents, jewellery, banking, stocks and shares (I'm sooo poor) well the skanky dirtbag vanman and his slimy creeps robbed it, I actually really miss the spaghetti jar! Happy new home to you!
  #28  
Old 09-05-2017, 10:59 PM
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Remember that you have two opportunities to discard and donate: once when you pack and once when you unpack.
  #29  
Old 09-06-2017, 09:04 AM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
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Just to re-emphasize - CULL EVERYTHING YOU POSSIBLY CAN! IMO You haven't done a good enough job culling unless you eventually find yourself wishing you had kept something you got rid of!

My wife and I recently downsized - tho not as drastically as you. We had all manner of stuff we had been keeping "just in case." Stuff from when our kids were small, old lamps, art which we would unlikely ever hang again, way too many linens, multiple sets of china... Turned out none of our kids wanted any of it. (Sorry for you loss. Don't know if you have any other kids/family. But if you two aren't going to be using it in the time you have left, you'd better be holding on to it for someone else close to you. If not, get rid of it.)

You are moving on to a new stage of your lives. Don't go into it encumbered by your old possessions. Live your new life - don't curate your old life. Anticipate a storage plan for your new apt. Moving from a house to an apt, you will find space to be at a premium. It will be worth investing in some stackable plastic bins or shelving units for your closets/garage/storage space.

Think hard whether you really expect to use each thing in your new lives. For example, in the kitchen. If you aren't going to be hosting big parties, you can get rid of a bunch of serving dishes, utensils, etc. Go through your books ruthlessly. I went through ours, and other than a VERY few of sentimental value, I got rid of any that I did not intend to read again. If you aren't going to be using a lamp or hanging art in your new place, get rid of it.

As you get rid of things, realize that most things are likely to be worth A LOT LESS to anyone else, than you think they should. If money is really tight and you have the time, a moving sale might make sense. But we ended up just taking a ton of stuff to Goodwill and taking the tax write off.

I urge you to think about budgeting for pros to move your heaviest/priciest items. Just a "2 men and a truck" deal. You are not as young as you used to be. Your friends are not insured. You don't want them injuring themselves moving a dresser. Pros will move dressers while full - saving you the need of emptying/packing/unpacking/refilling them. And it only takes one good bang to damage something exceeding the "savings" from a DIY move.

Final small point - make sure if the new apt has any regulations about moving - need to reserve a freight elevator, parking, etc.

Good luck.
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  #30  
Old 09-06-2017, 10:05 AM
jaycat jaycat is offline
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Write on the boxes what's in the boxes.
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  #31  
Old 09-06-2017, 12:03 PM
RTFirefly RTFirefly is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shalmanese View Post
* Measure out the major dimensions of all of your furniture, then get a giant roll of butcher's paper and cut out stencils of each piece. Go to the new house and lay out the furniture. Figure out what goes where and what you want to keep and what you want to get rid of.
I've done this, only with scale cutouts on graph paper.

Measure each room in the new place, draw the outlines of each room to scale on a sheet of graph paper, then draw outlines of your furniture to the same scale, cut them out, and move the pieces of furniture around on the graph paper until you're happy with where everything goes.

It involves a lot less paper, and you don't have to carry big pieces of paper from room to room to figure out where they ought to be.
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Old 09-06-2017, 12:59 PM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
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I've done this, only with scale cutouts on graph paper.
Yeah, we've done this for many years, and keep them all in a folder. Very helpful when considering rearranging furniture, or potential new purchases.

We recently repurposed a 3-season room, buying a rug, couch, and coffee table. My wife used an online tool that did the same thing and was very easy to use, but I never asked the name. Allowed her to save and print out various floor plans with the furniture situated differently. A lot easier than moving it around over and over (tho I suspect there will be some of that nevertheless! )
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  #33  
Old 09-06-2017, 02:02 PM
Tastes of Chocolate Tastes of Chocolate is offline
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I don't know if I agree with Tastes of Chocolate, to be honest. I've found it better to put everything away, as stuff left in the garage often stays there. YMMV.
If it stays in the garage for that long, you don't really need it, and out it goes.
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  #34  
Old 09-07-2017, 01:16 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Thanks, my good friend, for all your kind words! You always seem to know just the right words for the situation, and I always enjoy hearing from you. I hope you see this soon.

Your Friend

Quasi (Bill)
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  #35  
Old 09-07-2017, 01:26 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Volunteers! (Hopefully)

Being that we live in a University town, I wrote an e-mail to their "College and Community" office and asked for some help on 9.30 at about 10 am. I sure hope it works out. It would be great to see 10-15 kids from my Alma Mater in my front yard on that Saturday.

For that date, I'm renting a U-Haul for $30.00+0.99 cents a mile. I can deal with that, for sure, it being a 17 foot truck. A 2.5 mile trip, one way, I don't expect it being more expensive. And no, we're not buying boxes, blankets or anything peripheral. We're going to just tie everything and pad everything with old sheets/blankets, etc.

Dondra's putting green post-its on all the furniture and other heavy stuff that is to go. No green sticker? Come and ask to be sure.

Oh yeah, plenty of soft drinks and chips to be had for the kiddos.

Thanks to all of you for your kind assistance.

Quasi
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Last edited by Quasimodem; 09-07-2017 at 01:29 AM.
  #36  
Old 09-07-2017, 01:28 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Heh-Heh..... "Dondra's putting green"....... I wrote that!!! HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

*ahem*

Quasi
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Last edited by Quasimodem; 09-07-2017 at 01:28 AM.
  #37  
Old 09-07-2017, 10:17 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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My in-laws did a similar move about 4 years back. They took a few small items over every day - e.g. clothing, dishes, breakables, and then hired professional movers for the Big Day.

Doing a bit yourself every day gives you a chance to go through and decide on things you want to get rid of.

If you can afford it, having someone to do the packing as well as moving can be a big help (once you've sorted out what you truly don't want). We did that with our last move, 15 years ago now, as we simply did not have the time or energy to pack, and it was the best money we ever spent.
  #38  
Old 09-08-2017, 09:45 PM
janis_and_c0 janis_and_c0 is offline
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Don't know how much advice I have, but I just wanted to say it is VERY VERY VERY good to see you. I never know where/when you will turn up!
*HUGS*

I'm also sorry to hear of your loss, my friend.. drop me a line. I love you!
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  #39  
Old 09-08-2017, 11:06 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Hey, Janis! Good seeing you as well and thank you. Love you as well. *HUGS* Back!

Mama Z. This move is on a shoestring, my friend. We're on a fixed income and were recently struck very hard in the wallet. I am hoping my alumni association comes through for me and brings me some volunteer kids on the 30th.

Had a little mishap today as well, taking down my drum kit. I had just taken one of my cymbals off its stand, put it under my right arm, turned to leave the music room, started to walk and next thing I knew I was on the floor. My right leg had just buckled out from under me, the cymbal cut into my right chest area (not far - no stitches - hurts to take a deep breath, though), laceration to the under part of my pinky (2 stitches) and a swollen knee. All is well, but we lost 3.5 hours of moving time. We'll make that up tomorrow, np AND..... My cymbal's gonna be just fine!

Thanks

Q
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  #40  
Old 09-09-2017, 02:48 AM
janis_and_c0 janis_and_c0 is offline
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OW! Glad you weren't hurt (too) badly... If it leaves a scar though..

"How did that happen?"

"Drumming accident"


*LOL*
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  #41  
Old 09-14-2017, 12:04 AM
Caractacus Pott Caractacus Pott is offline
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Something that helped me in my last move was mattress bags. They're huge plastic bags with grab handles on the sides. Not only do they protect the bed from getting dirty in the move, the grab handles ease lifting and carrying the mattress and box spring. I think they were about $15 each from U-Haul.

When packing, mix heavy and light things in the same box. For instance, I put a few books in the bottom of a number of bins* then filled the rest of the with clothing, duvets, or kitchen plastic containers. Spreading the weight around reduced the number of "heavy" bins.

If it's possible, plan to spend the night (or two) before the move in a hotel. The day before the move you'll be able to pack all your everyday essentials. You'll eliminate some of the moving day stress because you can focus on supervising everyone instead of hoping things are going well while you're last minute packing. Packing all those last minute things will take longer than you expect, like removing the bed sheets and breaking down the bed, packing the shower curtain and towels, getting all the kitchen stuff you use every day packed, and whatever else pops up.

One last thing: consider what to do if it rains or snows on moving day. Do you have wall-to-wall carpeting that'll get dirty from everyone tromping in with wet shoes? Will the U-Haul fit under the building's overhang to minimize rain splashing into the truck and onto your cardboard boxes? You get the idea.

* I used plastic bins for almost everything. Strong, sturdy, stackable, and handles. I put nylon wire ties through the lock holes to prevent them from opening during transit. Keep a set of dykes handy to cut the wire ties when you unpack.
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  #42  
Old 09-14-2017, 12:42 AM
guestchaz guestchaz is offline
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wish I'd seen this thread earlier, I'm a mover, got all kinds of tips n tricks.

So how did the move go Quasi? Soon as you're able, let us know (unpacking and putting away/setting stuff back up is the worst imho)
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  #43  
Old 09-14-2017, 12:52 AM
Caractacus Pott Caractacus Pott is offline
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guestchaz, please spill your secrets. Upthread Quasimodem said he's moving on the thirtieth of this month.
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  #44  
Old 09-14-2017, 02:05 AM
guestchaz guestchaz is offline
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oops misread that as the 13th
ahem! ok, in no particular order, where to spend the money;

Packing paper, scrounge all the newspapers you can. That stuff runs about $35 or more a bundle very spendy.

boxes specifically for dishes and other glasswares. Home Depot sells them in smaller sizes(2 and 3 cubic foot) than the 5cuft size used by moving companies. Dish boxes are double walled boxes to protect your dishes and to withstand the strain of the weight. When packing your dishes, wrap in paper and pack them as tightly as possible in the boxes to prevent breakage. A well packed 5cuft dish pack should weigh about 100 to 150Lbs. The smaller 30 to 50 or 60ish Lbs depending on size. Oh and packing tape for the boxes also, do NOT use the overlapping flap tuck method to close the boxes

use a larger sharpie to write the room the contents of the box came out of and what is actually in the box on the side of the box and not the top, so that when you inevitably stack something on the box you can still tell where it goes and what is in it. I see people make this mistake a lot.

if you do buy boxes, you want boxes that are rectangular vertically instead of horizontally to stand up better to the stresses of being moved and stacked.

Pots and pans can go in any old container big enough to hold them

If you slide well packed box across a wood floor, it will scratch the floor.

Wheels are your friend along with a couple of someones with strong arms and good endurance. Rent if you can a four wheel dollie (or two if they are smaller than about 18"x30")and a hand truck. Protect your floors, if for no other reason than to save a cleaning bill later. For carpets, carpet mask (think giant cellophane tape) is a worthwhile investment when compared to the cost of cleaning. For hard floors put runners down of some kind. Secure the runners with blue tape or they will be a trip hazard. We use rubber backed "red carpet" runners, but cleancloth painters runners can be used in a pinch.

If you rent a Uhaul, the pads (moving blankets or quilts) they will want you to rent are small, thin, expensive and there really aren't enough of them. Use your own bedding, towels, whatever linens as packing/padding when possible. But also use the Uhaul pads if you need to.

Expect this to be a lot harder and more overwhelming than you think it is going to be, don't be afraid to ask for help, don't try to do all the packing and unpacking in one day either, you will end up discouraged and burned out unless you are one of those rare, seemingly unnatural people who unpack and put 1/2 an entire 5000sqft house of boxes while we are bringing in the furniture. Yes, the boxes will be there tomorrow and the next day, but also, the boxes will be there tomorrow and the next day

When moving the furniture into a room, try to place it where it is going to go the first time. Soon after that piece is in there it is going to be surrounded by boxes of stuff, maybe for that room, maybe not, its just easier that way. I see people make this mistake a lot also.

If your boxes are going in before the furniture, picture each room where the furniture will ultimately end up and don't put boxes in that spot (a common mistake movers make through inadequate communication) You don't want to handle stuff anymore than needed.

When stacking boxes, stack them so the labels are out and you can read whats inside. (common mistake)

Never stack boxes more than 3 or 4 high (depending on how heavy they are) or whatever is comfortable for you to reach and lift.

Stretch wrap is your friend, and can save you tons of work. Get a roll or two of both the small 6 or 8 inch and the 18 or 24 inch sizes.

If you have some very strong backs helping you, instead of unloading your dressers, stretch wrap them shut with the contents inside, have the strong backs place them on the wheels or carry them out and in and place them at destination and save all that packing and unpacking. Maybe stuff drawers containing looser, non clothing items with paper to tighten them up a bit and prevent rattling breaking and things falling out through the back.

Resign yourself now to the fact that something is going to get rubbed, chipped, dented, scratched or maybe even broken, be it furniture or the house or maybe even both.

Be prepared to see dents, rubs, scratches, stains, cracks and the like on your stuff out in the direct sunlight, that you never noticed indoors.

Be prepared for the stress moving brings. Have some sort of stress relief ready each evening andfor the unpacking/packing phase set hours of work just like a regular job. Schedule breaks, Morning Noon and Afternoon, just like a regular job.

Get plenty of sleep and be well rested and well fed etc, your body will need it to help cope with the stress.

Use copious blue tape and some older or thinner blankets to pad doorframes and doors to help prevent damage with taking furniture through them.

don't be afraid to dismantle furniture to move it.

Anything from Ikea or manufactured in that style of assemble/disassemble or made of press or particle board, just chuck it, give it away (just kidding). From a movers POV this is junk furniture, labor intensive and difficult to disassemble and reassemble and in the case of press or particle board furniture, more like than not to break during the move, don't be surprised if it happens. (furniture from walmart is the worst for breakage while moving)

That's all I've got for now as its getting pretty late here. I'll check back in later if I think of anything else.
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  #45  
Old 09-16-2017, 02:06 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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guestchaz!

Wow and WOW! what a lot of useful info! Thanks very much indeed.

Some new developments since the last time I posted:

1. Dondra and I are contuining with the little stuff such as clothes, dishes, etc. and with t-2 weeks approximately remaining, that part of the move is chugging right along.

2. Being that I am an alumnus of the University of West Georgia (back when it was called "West Georgia College") I asked theor community relations office for help in finding volunteers to help us with our move and so far we've found 8 persons - some professors some grad students and some exchange kids.

That's it. I hope I didn't mislead y'all in making you think this move is bigger than it is, but I was able to use much of what y'all suggested in the thread for the move. We have some Gorilla tape we plan on using to immobilize the drawers on all of the chests, night stands, etc. Also we have a sketch on where we want everything to go, having measured beforehand.

As before, I thank you very much for all the assistance. Wish we could pin it.

Quasi
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  #46  
Old 09-16-2017, 07:37 PM
guestchaz guestchaz is offline
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don't use gorilla tape. That stuff is duct tape on steroids and will leave residue at best, will damage your stuff at worst. do NOT use gorilla tape, do not use GORILLA TAPE, don't use the gorilla tape,


Oh hey Quasi, in case I forgot to mention it, don't use the Gorilla tape on your furniture, and also, don't let the Gorilla tape your furniture.
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  #47  
Old 09-16-2017, 08:13 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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So I shouldn't use Gorilla tape, right? Okay, Well, then how about we just take the drawers out and transport them that way?

Thanks, guestchaz

Q
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  #48  
Old 09-17-2017, 01:06 AM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
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The next time I move, I will be following this protocol:

1.) Determine the date of the move.

2.) Leave town two weeks before the scheduled date.

3.) Return to town two weeks after the scheduled date.
  #49  
Old 09-17-2017, 10:09 AM
guestchaz guestchaz is offline
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taking the drawers out is a good way to do it, saves loading and unloading the drawers, saves wear and tear on the muscles and stress on the furniture also, just have to be careful how and where you stack them to avoid breaking them.
On the issue of putting tape directly on your stuff, this is one area where stretch wrap comes in handy. A small lollipop (6 inch roll of wrap with a handle on the end) used to make a couple of passes around the drawers, basically just enough to hold itself in place, then put the tape (of whatever type) on top of the stretch wrap to hold it all together when the piece is moved is a good way to do it also.
I can't emphasize enough how much stretch wrap is a worthwhile expenditure during a move.


ETA Kaylasdad, still back in time to help finish unpack and put stuff away
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Last edited by guestchaz; 09-17-2017 at 10:12 AM.
  #50  
Old 09-17-2017, 10:25 AM
guestchaz guestchaz is offline
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OH, just cause I missed the edit window while reviewing the thread for whatever I missed (usually lots) On the clothes washer, be sure to tip it back (far back, almost laying on its back) a couple of times outside on the grass to get as much water out of it as you can, otherwise, you might find your stuff that you put on the truck next to the washer smelly and soaked. Maybe. Not garaunteed. But I've seen it happen enough to make me cautious.
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Last edited by guestchaz; 09-17-2017 at 10:25 AM.
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