Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-09-2017, 02:31 PM
Shoeless Shoeless is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: The Sunflower State
Posts: 5,570
Homemade taco seasoning - don't need answer fast

I was making tacos last night and realized I had forgotten to pick up a packet of taco seasoning while I was at the store. Oh well, I thought... I can do this. So I winged it (wung it?) and made my own. And it was OK, but not great.

For 1 lb of hamburger I used about 2 tsp chili powder, 1 tsp ground cumin, about 1/4 tsp each onion powder and garlic powder, and a dash of both black pepper and cayenne pepper. I mixed it with 2/3 cup of water which is what I usually add with a packet of seasoning. I tasted it while it was simmering and wound up adding about another 1/2 tsp of both chili powder and cumin.

It had a little bit of heat, which I assume came from the pepper, but was otherwise still kind of bland. So tell me where I screwed up. How do you make your own taco seasoning?
  #2  
Old 10-09-2017, 02:34 PM
silenus silenus is offline
The Turtle Moves!
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 48,746
Needs some ground Mexican oregano, for one. Then you need to amp up the chilis with some red pepper flake. Maybe some Spanish paprika.

Did you add any salt to the mix? It needs that, too.

Last edited by silenus; 10-09-2017 at 02:36 PM.
  #3  
Old 10-09-2017, 02:54 PM
Rhiannon8404 Rhiannon8404 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 7,598
We always make ours from scratch, and I put at least twice the amount of seasoning into my taco seasoning as you put. Also, as Silenus mentioned, oregano and salt. I don't actually measure, just put stuff in until it looks right and then taste it.
  #4  
Old 10-09-2017, 03:00 PM
RadioWave RadioWave is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 640
Yep. Oregano, salt as mentioned. Also Worcestershire Sauce and Coriander can add a nice touch.

If you have room, plant yourself some oregano. It grows like a weed so you've always got some on hand.
  #5  
Old 10-09-2017, 03:13 PM
AHunter3 AHunter3 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: NY (Manhattan) NY USA
Posts: 19,336
Fresh garlic and onion, not powder, will give it some depth. And chili powder: put down that silly teaspoon. Hold your hand open, pop the shaker thingie off the canister, and pour 1/4 cup or so, about as much as the hollow of your hand will hold. Now a can of green chiles (or do those fresh if you prefer). Cilantro, and oregano as mentioned. You can go heavier on the cumin and black pepper. Now throw in a couple of plum tomatoes, you want some tomato taste, typically.
  #6  
Old 10-09-2017, 03:50 PM
Shoeless Shoeless is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: The Sunflower State
Posts: 5,570
Mexican oregano - is that different than regular oregano? I'm not sure I've ever seen that in the spice aisle.

Coriander is not a bad idea - I've got some of that.

AHunter3 yeah if I was cooking for myself I'd be little more adventurous, but didn't want to overdo it and ruin everyone's dinner. I was just trying to get as close to a package mix as possible so nobody would notice.
  #7  
Old 10-09-2017, 03:59 PM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Under Oveur & over Unger
Posts: 10,558
packaged taco seasonings also typically have thickeners like maltodextrin and corn starch.
  #8  
Old 10-09-2017, 04:07 PM
Rhiannon8404 Rhiannon8404 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 7,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by jz78817 View Post
packaged taco seasonings also typically have thickeners like maltodextrin and corn starch.
Yep! It's the main reason we make our own.
  #9  
Old 10-09-2017, 04:09 PM
enalzi enalzi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhiannon8404 View Post
Yep! It's the main reason we make our own.
I still put corn starch in mine. I like my taco filling to be thicker than just ground beef.
  #10  
Old 10-09-2017, 04:12 PM
jnglmassiv jnglmassiv is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Chicago's Northside
Posts: 2,552
My own picadillo technique is to brown the ground chuck and set it aside. Next, sweat a whole chopped onion in the beef drippings. Add cumin, chili powder, Mexican oregano, a clove of minced garlic, black pepper and a Goya Sazon packet. Pour in a few ounces of beer and let it cook down. Add salt as desired but taste first since the sazon is already in there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoeless View Post
Mexican oregano - is that different than regular oregano? I'm not sure I've ever seen that in the spice aisle.
Completely different.
  #11  
Old 10-09-2017, 04:22 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,761
I am surprised that "real" Mexican food is typically not hot. Cumin is used as a garnish.
  #12  
Old 10-09-2017, 04:53 PM
silenus silenus is offline
The Turtle Moves!
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 48,746
They are from completely different botanical families. Look in the "International" aisle at your local mega-mart. Better still, look for the big display of Mexican spices in glassine bags. It's much fresher and very much cheaper than McCormick's.
  #13  
Old 10-09-2017, 05:22 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 42,372
Salt is the biggest thing missing. Otherwise, your ingredients are fine. I’d probably up the amount of garlic and onion, too. I’d also probably throw in some MSG or similar (stock cube or Sazon Goya) for the extra umami.

Last edited by pulykamell; 10-09-2017 at 05:22 PM.
  #14  
Old 10-09-2017, 05:32 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Slithering on the hull
Posts: 25,832
Just dropping by to advocate for genuine mexican oregano. You may have to hunt for it, but it's worth it, IMHO. It really improved my enchiladas, almost as much as grilling my corn tortillas before wrapping with them did!

Last edited by Qadgop the Mercotan; 10-09-2017 at 05:33 PM.
  #15  
Old 10-09-2017, 06:24 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 38,842
Way short on the spices. You should have at least 2 TBSP of chili powder for a pound of ground and several tsp of cumin. Agree with the Mexican oregano (not Greek). I also like a tsp or two of ground chipotle for the heat and some smoked paprika. Dice up some onion and perhaps a pepper, mince some garlic. Brown the meat, veggies and spices and then add the water/beer and let it simmer until the water mostly evaporates.
  #16  
Old 10-09-2017, 06:29 PM
Periwinkle Periwinkle is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 357
Wondra flour works great as a thickener. It comes in a canister with a shaker top. I use it all the time. Another thing that's useful to keep around is Frank's Hot Sauce, that would have zinged it up for you nicely.
  #17  
Old 10-10-2017, 07:04 PM
CBEscapee CBEscapee is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: México
Posts: 2,132
Americans actually have something called taco seasoning?
  #18  
Old 10-10-2017, 07:15 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 42,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBEscapee View Post
Americans actually have something called taco seasoning?
Yes. Just Google it. It even exists in other countries. Here's one from Hungary, for instance (which I mention because I lived there and had first-hand knowledge of it). Why is this a surprise to you?

Last edited by pulykamell; 10-10-2017 at 07:18 PM.
  #19  
Old 10-10-2017, 07:37 PM
CBEscapee CBEscapee is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: México
Posts: 2,132
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Yes. Just Google it. It even exists in other countries. Here's one from Hungary, for instance (which I mention because I lived there and had first-hand knowledge of it). Why is this a surprise to you?
Because to me, that would be like having sandwich seasoning. To us a taco is anything we put inside a tortilla, even something as simple as coarse sea salt, un taco de sal or anything else from meat to vegetable to dairy, whatever you choose. In our home a taco de carne asada is seasoned with just salt while different guisos are all prepared with different ingredients. I have never seen or heard of taco seasoning here. Is it for a specific type of taco?
  #20  
Old 10-10-2017, 07:40 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 42,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBEscapee View Post
Because to me, that would be like having sandwich seasoning. To us a taco is anything we put inside a tortilla, even something as simple as coarse sea salt, un taco de sal or anything else from meat to vegetable to dairy, whatever you choose. In our home a taco de carne asada is seasoned with just salt while different guisos are all prepared with different ingredients. I have never seen or heard of taco seasoning here. Is it for a specific type of taco?
I know what it is, and how it appears to you. Food gets mangled crazily. As an American, it was nuts what I saw labeled as "American" or even more regional subvarieties in countries I lived in or visited abroad. This is just par for the course.

ETA: Missed your question. It's basically for what would be closest to a picadillo taco.

Last edited by pulykamell; 10-10-2017 at 07:41 PM.
  #21  
Old 10-10-2017, 07:48 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 42,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBEscapee View Post
Because to me, that would be like having sandwich seasoning.
And that's actually not all that weird. That would be oil, vinegar, and various spices to me. Or a mayo-and-pickle based condiment. So not a dry seasoning, but, yes, there are such things as sandwich dressings and spreads.

Last edited by pulykamell; 10-10-2017 at 07:49 PM.
  #22  
Old 10-10-2017, 07:52 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 73,877
I find that when I'm cooking something, and it seems like it's missing something that I can't quite put my finger on, it's usually that it needs more garlic. I like to grill about half of it with the meat, and put the other half in right at the end of cooking, because cooked and raw garlic have different flavor profiles.
  #23  
Old 10-10-2017, 07:54 PM
CBEscapee CBEscapee is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: México
Posts: 2,132
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
And that's actually not all that weird. That would be oil, vinegar, and various spices to me. Or a mayo-and-pickle based condiment. So not a dry seasoning, but, yes, there are such things as sandwich dressings and spreads.
Of course, but not one, generic sandwich seasoning. We season our dishes with quite a variety of different herbs, spices and other ingredients but they are specific to that particular dish that will become the taco.
  #24  
Old 10-10-2017, 07:57 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 42,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBEscapee View Post
Of course, but not one, generic sandwich seasoning. We season our dishes with quite a variety of different herbs, spices and other ingredients but they are specific to that particular dish that will become the taco.
Yes, but we do have generic sandwich spreads here. See here. Or what is simply known as "Miracle Whip." Yes, I get what you're saying: "You crazy Americans bastardizing our cuisine by creating something called "taco seasoning." But this happens with cuisines everywhere. Like I said, when I go abroad, I sometimes shake my head at what is labeled as "American." This happens interculturally everywhere. There's nothing exceptional or weird about it.

Last edited by pulykamell; 10-10-2017 at 07:58 PM.
  #25  
Old 10-10-2017, 08:37 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Slithering on the hull
Posts: 25,832
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBEscapee View Post
Of course, but not one, generic sandwich seasoning. We season our dishes with quite a variety of different herbs, spices and other ingredients but they are specific to that particular dish that will become the taco.
Here's a pretty standard US "taco seasoning" recipe:
Quote:
Tbsp. Chili Powder
1/4 tsp. Garlic Powder
1/4 tsp. Onion Powder
1/4 tsp. Crushed Red Pepper Flakes
1/4 tsp. Dried Oregano
1/2 tsp. Paprika
1 1/2 tsp. Ground Cumin
1 tsp. Sea Salt
1 tsp. Black Pepper
Personally, I'm not a fan of spice blends. I prefer to add a dash of this and a bit of that until I'm satisfied. But your average US consumer likes things pretty much the same across the nation, flavor-wise.

Last edited by Qadgop the Mercotan; 10-10-2017 at 08:37 PM.
  #26  
Old 10-10-2017, 09:24 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,761
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBEscapee View Post
Americans actually have something called taco seasoning?
There was an effort in the 1960's to sell "foreign" foods by US companies.
Pseudo Chinese was made by "Chung King". Bean sprouts and celery, to which the housewife added meat.
"Old El Paso" and another company the name of which I do not remember, sold taco shells, corn torillas fried into a U shape, with "taco seasoning", a thickening agent and mild pepper. The housewife added ground beef.
The actual Mexican restaurants here, like Tortas Mexican (Mexican sandwiches) serve, as you describe, meat in a soft taco with onions and cilantro. There are sauces on the table of various heat. They are usually surprised to have cheese dip requested, which is a USA dish, my Wife assures me.
Someone, somewhere in the USA decided that "Mexican" food should be hot, and hence the various recipes described here.
A US restaurant chain, Taco Bell, serves things like burritos that consist of a small amount of meat, a little more beans, and a lot of lettuce.
  #27  
Old 10-10-2017, 09:30 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,761
Chung King also had rice noodles and soy sauce in packets. For a long time, that was the only way to find soy sauce in the United States.
Taco Bell also adds vast amount of shredded cheese with the lettuce.
  #28  
Old 10-10-2017, 09:37 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 42,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
There was an effort in the 1960's to sell "foreign" foods by US companies.
Pseudo Chinese was made by "Chung King". Bean sprouts and celery, to which the housewife added meat.
"Old El Paso" and another company the name of which I do not remember, sold taco shells, corn torillas fried into a U shape, with "taco seasoning", a thickening agent and mild pepper. The housewife added ground beef.
The actual Mexican restaurants here, like Tortas Mexican (Mexican sandwiches) serve, as you describe, meat in a soft taco with onions and cilantro. There are sauces on the table of various heat. They are usually surprised to have cheese dip requested, which is a USA dish, my Wife assures me.
Someone, somewhere in the USA decided that "Mexican" food should be hot, and hence the various recipes described here.
A US restaurant chain, Taco Bell, serves things like burritos that consist of a small amount of meat, a little more beans, and a lot of lettuce.
CBEscapee has been involved in these conversations long enough to know all this. I doubt he is unaware.
  #29  
Old 10-10-2017, 09:37 PM
silenus silenus is offline
The Turtle Moves!
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 48,746
Is this where I mention Penzey's Sandwich Sprinkle?
  #30  
Old 10-10-2017, 09:42 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,761
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
CBEscapee has been involved in these conversations long enough to know all this. I doubt he is unaware.
Excuse the heck out of me!
  #31  
Old 10-10-2017, 09:43 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 42,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
Excuse the heck out of me!
No offense to you.

Last edited by pulykamell; 10-10-2017 at 09:46 PM.
  #32  
Old 10-10-2017, 09:54 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,761
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
No offense to you.
I see the bullshit as all the peppery seasoning recommended. Perhaps that is "Tex Mex" which may or may not be offensive.

Perhaps, obviously, that is what most citizens of the USA expect from so called Mexican food.

Last edited by carnivorousplant; 10-10-2017 at 09:56 PM.
  #33  
Old 10-10-2017, 11:36 PM
CBEscapee CBEscapee is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: México
Posts: 2,132
So I get the idea that the taco seasoning packages are meant to be added to ground beef or are they used with other meats like chicken or pork or fish?
  #34  
Old 10-11-2017, 06:12 AM
jerez jerez is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 418
There's "chili" seasoning, too (as if that subject weren't already a can of worms). I bought a packet once and found that it wasn't very spicy, and adding more just made things worse. It reminded me of the dust at the bottom of a bag of Doritos. I decided it wasn't a very good idea when I noticed that it was made by a German or Dutch company. Nothing against such companies, of course.
Quote:
Maybe some Spanish paprika.
Yeah, spicy paprika (pimentón picante) adds some depth and bite; too much if not used sparingly.
  #35  
Old 10-11-2017, 06:26 AM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Under Oveur & over Unger
Posts: 10,558
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Yes, but we do have generic sandwich spreads here. See here. Or what is simply known as "Miracle Whip." Yes, I get what you're saying: "You crazy Americans bastardizing our cuisine by creating something called "taco seasoning." But this happens with cuisines everywhere. Like I said, when I go abroad, I sometimes shake my head at what is labeled as "American." This happens interculturally everywhere. There's nothing exceptional or weird about it.
Go take a look at what the Japanese did to pizza, and try to say we’re bad about this.
  #36  
Old 10-11-2017, 07:19 AM
MrDibble MrDibble is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Cape Town, South Africa &
Posts: 21,541
Quote:
Originally Posted by jz78817 View Post
Go take a look at what the Japanese did to pizza, and try to say we’re bad about this.
But do they label it as "Italian" Pizza even while they're inflicting corn, potato and mayo on it?
  #37  
Old 10-11-2017, 07:58 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 42,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBEscapee View Post
So I get the idea that the taco seasoning packages are meant to be added to ground beef or are they used with other meats like chicken or pork or fish?
Typically, it's used with ground beef, but it can be used with chicken, pork, whatever you want. Think of it as generic Tex-Mex seasoning, like how you have "Italian seasoning." In America, the main flavors associated with Mexican food are chile peppers and cumin. Taco seasoning isn't actually all that far off from chili powder, to be honest.
  #38  
Old 10-11-2017, 08:05 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 42,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDibble View Post
But do they label it as "Italian" Pizza even while they're inflicting corn, potato and mayo on it?
I don't know about that, but the Germans apparently think corn is part of "American style" pizza. Or that tuna and red onions is apprarently indicative of a "California pizza."

Or how I went to a '50s style American diner in Budapest (cheesy memorabilia included), ordered a hamburger, and got served an open faced sandwich for some reason. (This one I really didn't understand, since there were plenty of burger places in town, so how in the hell did someone think a hamburger in a 50s diner would be served open faced?)

Or how in Eastern Europe, "French salad" is a pile of peas and carrots in mayonnaise. I'm pretty sure that's not a common salad in France, but I could be wrong.

Food gets adapted or massacred (however you want to look at it) everywhere.
  #39  
Old 10-11-2017, 03:38 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 73,877
I remember one time at a sandwich shop in Montana, I mentioned that they were the only place I'd ever found outside of the Philadelphia area that made a proper Philadelphia cheesesteak. The response? "Oh, no, we don't make Philadelphia cheesesteaks. We don't put lettuce and tomato on them." Exactly!
  #40  
Old 10-11-2017, 03:42 PM
swampspruce swampspruce is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 3,772
Try adding a tsp or so of cacao or unsweetened chocolate as well. It gives your taco filling a dark, rich colour and the astringency cuts the richness of the meat and enhances the rest of the spices. Kinda like a mole sauce but much easier.
__________________
Instead of being presented with stereotypes by age, sex, color, class, or religion, children must have the opportunity to learn that within each range, some people are loathsome and some are delightful. -Margaret Mead
  #41  
Old 10-11-2017, 04:22 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 38,842
Using packaged taco seasoning is no different than using curry powder. It's a shortcut for when you don't want to go to all the trouble of mixing your own. That said, I've known people who thought that curry powder came from some sort of curry plant.
  #42  
Old 10-11-2017, 04:23 PM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Under Oveur & over Unger
Posts: 10,558
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDibble View Post
But do they label it as "Italian" Pizza even while they're inflicting corn, potato and mayo on it?
no, but then again I don't think I've seen it labeled that much if at all in the US either. Usually people refer to the regional style e.g. New York style (big, floppy, thin crust,) Chicago-style (deep dish with upturned crust edges,) Detroit style (square deep dish, cheese all the way to the edges, sauce on top) and so on. IME the only times I've specifically seen "Italian" as a descriptor is in smaller pizzerias where they make e.g. actual Neapolitan pizzas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
I don't know about that, but the Germans apparently think corn is part of "American style" pizza. Or that tuna and red onions is apprarently indicative of a "California pizza."
that looks like it's a total mish-mash of stuff. The bread looks like it's for sfincione.
  #43  
Old 10-11-2017, 08:15 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,761
I thought Europeans viewed corn as fodder for horses and cattle.
  #44  
Old 10-11-2017, 08:34 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 73,877
Fodder for horses, cattle, and Americans. Hence why pizza with corn on it is considered "American style".
  #45  
Old 10-11-2017, 09:25 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
Fodder for horses, cattle, and Americans. Hence why pizza with corn on it is considered "American style".
Thanks. Are you whoosing me?

Dr. Johnson, author of the first English dictionary, defined oats as "A grain that in England is fed principally to horses, but in Scotland supports the population."
  #46  
Old 10-11-2017, 10:03 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 73,877
Quote:
Thanks. Are you whoosing me?
Not that I know of. Europeans know that we eat a lot of corn. Which is true. We just don't eat it in the ways that Europeans think we do.
  #47  
Old 10-11-2017, 10:27 PM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Under Oveur & over Unger
Posts: 10,558
Quote:
Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
I thought Europeans viewed corn as fodder for horses and cattle.
I've heard the same, which would mean they aren't aware of the differences between field/dent corn (the stuff used for animal feed, processed foods, and industrial ethanol) and sweet corn (the stuff we eat as-is, whether on-the-cob or canned.)


we don't (usually) feed animals sweet corn, and we don't break our teeth trying to eat dent corn on the cob. seriously, dent corn is borderline inedible when unprocessed. It's rock hard, dry, and starchy. I buy bags of it in the fall for deer feed.

Last edited by jz78817; 10-11-2017 at 10:32 PM.
  #48  
Old 10-12-2017, 07:27 AM
Balthisar Balthisar is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Southeast Michigan, USA
Posts: 10,410
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBEscapee View Post
So I get the idea that the taco seasoning packages are meant to be added to ground beef or are they used with other meats like chicken or pork or fish?
They're meant for American style tacos. But, seriously, go to la Comer. You've got all of these McCormick and other brands of pre-mixed packets of stuff, too, for use with chicken, pork, fish, goat.

Typical "taco seasoning" (I like Alton Brown's recipe) isn't anything remotely close to anything in Mexico. I would describe it as more of a southwest USA flavor, especially given the quantity of cumin. Granted, they use cumin in Mexico, but not nearly as much as they use in the SW USA. And, yes, you can use it with chicken or pork, but I don't imagine it would go nicely with fish.
  #49  
Old 10-12-2017, 07:51 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 42,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balthisar View Post
but I don't imagine it would go nicely with fish.
Maybe, maybe not, but they do have fish taco seasoning to solve that problem.
  #50  
Old 10-12-2017, 08:52 AM
CBEscapee CBEscapee is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: México
Posts: 2,132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balthisar View Post
They're meant for American style tacos. But, seriously, go to la Comer. You've got all of these McCormick and other brands of pre-mixed packets of stuff, too, for use with chicken, pork, fish, goat.

Typical "taco seasoning" (I like Alton Brown's recipe) isn't anything remotely close to anything in Mexico. I would describe it as more of a southwest USA flavor, especially given the quantity of cumin. Granted, they use cumin in Mexico, but not nearly as much as they use in the SW USA. And, yes, you can use it with chicken or pork, but I don't imagine it would go nicely with fish.
Of course there are spice mixes for certain specific dishes here but they aren't so broad as what taco seasoning implies. And you know what I am talking about when I say trying to narrow tacos down to a certain flavor or recipe is unbelievable to Mexicans. There is no such thing.

BTW a packaged spice mix for goat? Never seen or heard of that!!
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:12 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright © 2017 Sun-Times Media, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017