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Old 10-09-2017, 08:48 PM
papaw papaw is offline
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Given names these days

I am an older man (74+) and have seen some widely varied given names, even in my own family. I don't mind the current popular ones, but I wonder where they come from. Odd (to me ) spellings, and unusual constructions are quite common these days.
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Old 10-09-2017, 08:59 PM
kunilou kunilou is offline
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There's nothing really new about it. My father was born in 1916, his middle name was Alan. Not to be confused with Alen, Allan, Allen, Allann, Allenn, Allyn. . .
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Old 10-09-2017, 09:36 PM
Aspidistra Aspidistra is offline
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My personal theory about this is that it's driven by the almost exclusive use of first names in public these days - as opposed to, say, a couple of generations ago, when people outside the family/friend circle used surnames much more often.

It didn't matter so much being the fifth James in the room when you were actually "Mr Smith", "Mr Black", "Mr Thomson"... and so on and so forth. Now it does, and people avoid it.
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Old 10-10-2017, 05:03 PM
dstarfire dstarfire is offline
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A couple of possible factors:
1. There was a trend years back to spell common names in odd ways to honor one's ancestry or heritage. It seems to have resurfaced recently.

2. I've known families that had a sort of naming tradition (e.g. all girls names start with a c) and would use odd spellings to match their preferred name to that tradition. Fortunately, I've not encountered a family where these last more than a generation.
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Old 10-11-2017, 12:25 PM
papaw papaw is offline
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I guess I am asking the wrong question.
Without any disrespect to African-Americans, the names I am asking about are the ones that in the last 25 years or so have surfaced with odd to me spellings and unknown origins.
Some examples are-
Jedeveoon, Bonquisha,Tanisha, T'a nay,, Deshaun, Tayshaun, Deron, Rau'shee, Raynell, Deontay, Taraje, Jozy, Kerron, Hyleas, Chaunte, Bershawn, Lashawn, Sanya, Trevell, Sheena, Ogonna, Dremiel , and many others.
"it is largely and profoundly the legacy of African-Americans," writes Eliza Dinwiddie-Boyd in her baby-naming book "Proud Heritage." Shalondra and Shaday, Jenneta and Jonelle, Michandra and Milika -- in some parts of the country today, nearly a third of African-American girls are given a name belonging to no one else in the state (boys' names tend to be somewhat more conservative).
Why is this so ?
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Old 10-11-2017, 12:32 PM
astorian astorian is offline
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One factor: for centuries, Catholics were expected to give their children the names of saints. When I was a kid, I saw nuns giving classmates the third degree if their names didn't immediately sound saintly. ("Was there a St. Jennifer???" "Sob! I don't know, Sister!")

That was never a rule, just a tradition. Regardless, it FELT like a rule, which is why all the Irish boys in my class were John, James or Patrick while all the Italian boys were Peter, Paul, Vincent or Anthony. And all the girls were Mary, Elizabeth, Catherine, Anne, or some combination of those.

Now, nobody cares about rules or traditions, so Catholic parents name their kids Sierra and Dakota and Skyler or ____ just like everyone else.
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Old 10-11-2017, 12:43 PM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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It is a fad--people around you are giving their children brand new, made-up names and you decide it would be interesting to give your child a brand new, made-up name. The meme just reached a critical mass. (On the other hand, all names must be made up at some time or another. In a few generations, kids may be back to getting named after their ancestors, and complaining about being given an old-fashoned name like their grandfather, Tequeshauwndre.)

Also, this thread can't be complete without this clip.
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Old 10-11-2017, 12:53 PM
CookingWithGas CookingWithGas is offline
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My theory is that due to the exponential development of mass media, people are more often modeling themselves on celebrities, trying to be oh-so unique. (See also "Las Vegas Show As Model For Weddings").

I think it all started with Petula Clark.
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Old 10-11-2017, 01:00 PM
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Here's an interesting series of blog posts about the racial origins of the "weird name" lists and jokes which get spread around, with an interesting example (from the second post in the sequence) of one you won't hear:
Quote:
A college student comes home for the summer and her shocked parents see that she's obviously pregnant. She tells them that she's determined to finish school on time and that all of her sorority sisters have promised to help her with the baby. Sure enough, come September she's back on campus with her baby son in her arms: little Kegger, named for the place he was conceived.
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Old 10-11-2017, 01:00 PM
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Also, this thread can't be complete without this clip.
Thank you !
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Old 10-11-2017, 01:06 PM
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This is probably better suited to IMHO than General Questions.

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Old 10-11-2017, 01:10 PM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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One interesting case is Oprah Winfrey. Her birth name was Orpah, but so many people misspelled/mispronounced it that "Oprah" stuck.
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Old 10-11-2017, 02:53 PM
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Our local newspaper still prints births every week, as released by local hospitals. I read with amusement every week at what people name their babies. Just this week we have... Karsyn, Kinsley, Jayda, Oaklyn, Becca, Paxton, Orion and the winner... Sereneetee.

I don't really care what people name their kids, but I do feel bad that these new people will spend their entire lives having to enunciate and spell their names over and over and over. I think it amounts to a mild form of torture.
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Old 10-11-2017, 03:04 PM
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One interesting case is Oprah Winfrey. Her birth name was Orpah, but so many people misspelled/mispronounced it that "Oprah" stuck.
I did not know that. Interestingly, Ophrah seems to be a Biblical name as well.
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Old 10-11-2017, 03:22 PM
Arcite Arcite is offline
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I guess I am asking the wrong question.
Without any disrespect to African-Americans, the names I am asking about are the ones that in the last 25 years or so have surfaced with odd to me spellings and unknown origins.
Some examples are-
Jedeveoon, Bonquisha,Tanisha, T'a nay,, Deshaun, Tayshaun, Deron, Rau'shee, Raynell, Deontay, Taraje, Jozy, Kerron, Hyleas, Chaunte, Bershawn, Lashawn, Sanya, Trevell, Sheena, Ogonna, Dremiel , and many others.
"it is largely and profoundly the legacy of African-Americans," writes Eliza Dinwiddie-Boyd in her baby-naming book "Proud Heritage." Shalondra and Shaday, Jenneta and Jonelle, Michandra and Milika -- in some parts of the country today, nearly a third of African-American girls are given a name belonging to no one else in the state (boys' names tend to be somewhat more conservative).
Why is this so ?
The thing is, whites have now jumped on the bandwagon, with nonsense like "Brayden" and "Makenna." My theory is that it's due to the rise in single motherhood, with mothers now naming their children as opposed to fathers, because men are more likely to want to name a child after an ancestor or famous person they admire, while women are more likely to pick a name they think is "cute" or "quirky" or "distinctive."
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Old 10-11-2017, 03:23 PM
Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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The youngest children I know are named Midas, Ma'kayla, and Nova.
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Old 10-11-2017, 03:27 PM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is online now
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I knew someone back in the 70s (and named in the 50s) whose name was Roe. She discovered it was supposed to be "Rose," but they misspelled it on the birth certificate.

Of course, Jewish naming tradition is to name someone for a deceased relative (not a living one!). But even in the 1980s, my cousin middle name was "Dove" instead of "David."

The issue is that you used to be teased if you had a too-unusual name. Nowadays, there are plenty of names that don't appear on the top name lists, so people are used to it.
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Old 10-11-2017, 03:29 PM
Joey P Joey P is offline
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Also, this thread can't be complete without this clip.
I'd go with this one, for this thread.
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Old 10-11-2017, 03:32 PM
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is offline
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And then there is the situation where old-fashioned sounding names are coming back in trend. I personally know little boys named Elliot and Theodore.
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Old 10-11-2017, 03:32 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is online now
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People should have GUIDs instead of names. Everything will become easier. My GUID is {524n9982-z20q-12f9-g459-416711223421}, but I hate it when people refer to me as simply {524n9982}, I hate that, please don't do it.
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Old 10-11-2017, 03:35 PM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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Our local newspaper still prints births every week, as released by local hospitals. I read with amusement every week at what people name their babies. Just this week we have... Karsyn, Kinsley, Jayda, Oaklyn, Becca, Paxton, Orion and the winner... Sereneetee.
Ever notice the lists of "production babies" at the end of the credits on CGI movies? Here are a handful from movies I happened to have on my HD at the moment.
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Old 10-11-2017, 04:00 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
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One factor: for centuries, Catholics were expected to give their children the names of saints. When I was a kid, I saw nuns giving classmates the third degree if their names didn't immediately sound saintly. ("Was there a St. Jennifer???" "Sob! I don't know, Sister!")

That was never a rule, just a tradition. Regardless, it FELT like a rule, which is why all the Irish boys in my class were John, James or Patrick while all the Italian boys were Peter, Paul, Vincent or Anthony. And all the girls were Mary, Elizabeth, Catherine, Anne, or some combination of those.

Now, nobody cares about rules or traditions, so Catholic parents name their kids Sierra and Dakota and Skyler or ____ just like everyone else.


I used to substitute teach (and my husband used to live) in Italian-American neighborhoods. Lots of Josephs!

One Italian-American girl I knew was named Stacey, and wished it "meant something", since she couldn't find a source for the name. She was thrilled when I explained it came from the name "Anastasia", which means "resurrection."

Last edited by Dendarii Dame; 10-11-2017 at 04:01 PM.
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Old 10-11-2017, 04:05 PM
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Ever notice the lists of "production babies" at the end of the credits on CGI movies? Here are a handful from movies I happened to have on my HD at the moment.
I never heard that term "production babies" before. Interesting that one movie had two boys named Silas and two girls named Vivienne. There was a Silas in my school, and kids made fun of his name year after year. I'm seeing a lot of "Jax" and "Jaxson" now. I suppose from Sons of Anarchy.
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Old 10-11-2017, 04:13 PM
GreysonCarlisle GreysonCarlisle is offline
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And then there is the situation where old-fashioned sounding names are coming back in trend. I personally know little boys named Elliot and Theodore.
Evelyn and Charlotte are currently having a huge resurgence, as well.
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Old 10-11-2017, 06:18 PM
Derleth Derleth is online now
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And then there is the situation where old-fashioned sounding names are coming back in trend. I personally know little boys named Elliot and Theodore.
I have a three-and-a-half year old niece named Alice.

She's already growing up in a house full of cats. I can't wait to start introducing her to Alice in Wonderland, and the great Cheshire Cat himself.
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Old 10-11-2017, 06:24 PM
Moriarty Moriarty is offline
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I never heard that term "production babies" before. Interesting that one movie had two boys named Silas and two girls named Vivienne. There was a Silas in my school, and kids made fun of his name year after year. I'm seeing a lot of "Jax" and "Jaxson" now. I suppose from Sons of Anarchy.
Anecdotally, I, too, notice a lot of Jacksons (and spelling variations) among my 4 year old son's social circle.
...
The book Freakonomics did a part on naming conventions. As I recall, the trend was that the names of the wealthier class tended to trickle down to the lower classes in subsequent generations.

I think, too, that the African American examples of unusual names may be a reflection of a portion of the culture that originally sought to separate itself from slave legacies (of which "Christian" names are one relic).

As for my kid...his first and middle names are from his mother's family name. His first name is a last name that works as a first name (and is both his great-grandmother's maiden name and his grandfather's middle name).

Last edited by Moriarty; 10-11-2017 at 06:26 PM.
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Old 10-11-2017, 06:39 PM
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
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One factor: for centuries, Catholics were expected to give their children the names of saints. When I was a kid, I saw nuns giving classmates the third degree if their names didn't immediately sound saintly. ("Was there a St. Jennifer???" "Sob! I don't know, Sister!")

That was never a rule, just a tradition. Regardless, it FELT like a rule, which is why all the Irish boys in my class were John, James or Patrick while all the Italian boys were Peter, Paul, Vincent or Anthony. And all the girls were Mary, Elizabeth, Catherine, Anne, or some combination of those.

Now, nobody cares about rules or traditions, so Catholic parents name their kids Sierra and Dakota and Skyler or ____ just like everyone else.
I lived down the street from an Oh, so very Catholic family, where all the kids went to Catholic school, and they had about 11 of them. All the girls (I think 7 of them) were Mary Something. Mary Theresa, Mary Catherine, Mary Bernadette, Mary Josephine &c (I don't remember them all). Of course, they were Terrie, Cat, Dee and Jo, IRL. Cat and Dee both babysat for my brother and me a handful of times.

My son's name is John. His Hebrew name is Yochanan. We call him Johnny. He just turned 11, and I keep expecting him to come to us and ask us to just call him "John," or even "Jack," but not so far. He is very big for his age, so maybe he likes being a "Gentle Giant," I don't know. Or maybe it's just because he likes The Big Bang Theory, so as far as he is concerned, he has a TV star name.

Anyway, you would not believe how many people compliment us on his "classic" name. He is named after a very old childhood friend of mine, who sadly passed away at age 34, and he was named after his grandfather, but we take all compliments as intended, and smile.
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Old 10-11-2017, 10:15 PM
papaw papaw is offline
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I really appreciate all the responses !
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Old 10-11-2017, 10:59 PM
suranyi suranyi is offline
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Originally Posted by Orwell View Post
I never heard that term "production babies" before. Interesting that one movie had two boys named Silas and two girls named Vivienne. There was a Silas in my school, and kids made fun of his name year after year. I'm seeing a lot of "Jax" and "Jaxson" now. I suppose from Sons of Anarchy.
The thing is, judging by the kids in my son's school, every other child has an "unusual" name nowadays. So it's not that big a deal. When every name is strange, then none are, and it's no longer something to be made fun of.
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Old 10-12-2017, 12:33 AM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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I guess I am asking the wrong question.
Without any disrespect to African-Americans, the names I am asking about are the ones that in the last 25 years or so have surfaced with odd to me spellings and unknown origins.
Some examples are-
Jedeveoon, Bonquisha,Tanisha, T'a nay,, Deshaun, Tayshaun, Deron, Rau'shee, Raynell, Deontay, Taraje, Jozy, Kerron, Hyleas, Chaunte, Bershawn, Lashawn, Sanya, Trevell, Sheena, Ogonna, Dremiel , and many others.
"it is largely and profoundly the legacy of African-Americans," writes Eliza Dinwiddie-Boyd in her baby-naming book "Proud Heritage." Shalondra and Shaday, Jenneta and Jonelle, Michandra and Milika -- in some parts of the country today, nearly a third of African-American girls are given a name belonging to no one else in the state (boys' names tend to be somewhat more conservative).
Why is this so ?
Forget about ever getting a job with a name like that, assuming you stay out of jail long enough to ever apply for one.

(well, it's true)
  #31  
Old 10-12-2017, 12:34 AM
Beckdawrek Beckdawrek is online now
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My lil'wrekker's real name is a season and our last name is an object, so she gets double takes on her name all the time, but they are really very common words. Just not names, generally speaking.
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Old 10-12-2017, 01:00 AM
GuanoLad GuanoLad is offline
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The only reason old fashiond names sound old fashioned is because they were popular a long time ago, and the people who have those names are elderly now. There's nothing inherently old about them. And at the time that many of them were created, they were new-fangled and unusual.

Apparently there was a time when most people were called either Mary, Elizabeth, Henry, or John. You have to start distinguishing yourself then, so you create Rosemary, Betty, Harry, and Jack, or Marybeth, Lizzie, Hank, or Johnny.

Names ideally should reflect character, but they rarely do, even though a lot of times people seem to grow into them like destiny draws them that way. There was a kid I used to know whose name was Arthur Whittleston. Imagine what kind of person fits that name. Yes, that is exactly what he was like.

I don't have any kids, but I would be tempted to choose a name for them that would be unique enough that there wouldn't be three others in their class at School, but not so unusual that they would need to spell it out every time. I have a niece named Briar who I think fits that rule very successfully.
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Old 10-12-2017, 01:03 AM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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What would Johns Hopkins think? Or Salmon P. Chase? Or Cotton Mather? Or even Mathew Brady?
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  #34  
Old 10-12-2017, 01:09 AM
GuanoLad GuanoLad is offline
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My lil'wrekker's real name is a season and our last name is an object, so she gets double takes on her name all the time, but they are really very common words. Just not names, generally speaking.
Her name is Spring Spring? Is she a panda?
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Old 10-12-2017, 01:22 AM
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I have three great nieces (ages ten and under)- Ione, Fiona, and Matilda. Just more names I'd associate with my grandmother's generation.

The strangest names of people I have personally met have to include Maleria (she said it was pronounced Mallory, but it sure didn't read that way on her cashier's name tag), Euretha, and Chimera (pr. Sha-mare-uh).
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Old 10-12-2017, 01:29 AM
Grumbacher Red Grumbacher Red is offline
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The only reason old fashiond names sound old fashioned is because they were popular a long time ago, and the people who have those names are elderly now. There's nothing inherently old about them. And at the time that many of them were created, they were new-fangled and unusual.
I hear ya, but some names just sound old. Who would look down at a newborn and say they want to call their kid Gladys? Or Ralph, Agnes or Stanley.

I get it names go through fads and phases. I was born in the early 60s, and I knew tons of Lisas and Teresas. Nobody is naming girls Lisa too much right now, but it will swing back around.

My sister was born in the early 70s when the movie Love Story was popular and her name is Jennifer Lynn. She complains that in her generation there are enough Jennifer Lynns and Jennifer Leighs to fill a dozen stadiums. Alot of people really liked Love Story.

I taught at a Technical College for a number of years, and I encountered 3 girls' names over and over. Ashley. Tiffany. Brittany. In every spelling incarnation imaginable. Equally popular among various races. I was guaranteed every class was going to have multiples of each.

And despite my own Irish heritage, I do find this latest batch of plays on Gaelic names like Aislynn, and the over-used Kaitlyn and Kayley and Hayley to be just redundant and annoying.
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Old 10-12-2017, 03:24 AM
BobBitchin' BobBitchin' is offline
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Born in 1968...you know, 9 months after the summer of love

Would you be surprised to know I went to school with a pair of sisters named...
Rainbow and Sunshine.

And the made up spelling of names like Kaitlin, Katelynn, Kaitlynn etc, I always thought it was like the metal bands in the 80's

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Old 10-12-2017, 06:28 AM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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My lil'wrekker's real name is a season and our last name is an object, so she gets double takes on her name all the time, but they are really very common words. Just not names, generally speaking.
Poor Rainyseason Hammer.
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Old 10-12-2017, 07:49 AM
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The strangest names of people I have personally met have to include Maleria (she said it was pronounced Mallory, but it sure didn't read that way on her cashier's name tag), Euretha, and Chimera (pr. Sha-mare-uh).
Aren't those three of the four Horsemen of the Apocalypse?
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Old 10-12-2017, 08:22 AM
WOOKINPANUB WOOKINPANUB is online now
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When a co-worker told us his newborn's name was Samuel, I had to suppress the urge to say "your wife gave birth to an 80 year old man?" . And it's Samuel!!NOT Sam! Oh, please
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Old 10-12-2017, 08:52 AM
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
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As far as I'm concerned, you can open the dictionary to a random page, and throw a dart at it. If you kid gets named Drain, Cashew, Fuchsia, Prostate, or Yeoman, so be it, but spell the damn thing right.

I feel sorry for the kids I meet named Kortnee, Khessenndra, Leighah, Emmaleigh, and my "favorite" () Krystiyan. For cripes sake, there is a right way to spell "Christian." I felt very sorry for a kindergarten teacher I knew who one year had something like this on her roster: Brittany, Britney, Bretagne, Brittni, and Britnie, plus two Briannas pronounced differently, and a Briyona, and just to make it crazier, a boy named Brian. She had to remember each spelling, and which one went with which child, and parents got really mad if she screwed up.

You aren't allowed to go around spelling other words just any old way you want, and that goes for the names of your children too. Aside from a few names that have variants because they have come from different countries, names have fixed spellings. Don't go mucking with them. That goes double for people who don't understand the rules of orthography. "Lisa" cannot be spelled "Leca," because a C followed by an A is a hard C.

Grrrr.
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Old 10-12-2017, 08:58 AM
Grumbacher Red Grumbacher Red is offline
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I have three great nieces (ages ten and under)- Ione, Fiona, and Matilda. Just more names I'd associate with my grandmother's generation.

The strangest names of people I have personally met have to include Maleria (she said it was pronounced Mallory, but it sure didn't read that way on her cashier's name tag), Euretha, and Chimera (pr. Sha-mare-uh).
Euretha? Sounds like another misguided soul who knows just enough anatomy to be dangerous.

I am a RN and worked in Labor & Delivery early in my career. I had a patient in the early 90s who named her daughter Placenta. How do you gently and tactfully talk a new mom out of doing that to her kid? It crosses my mind occasionally that there is a young woman walking around somewhere stuck with that.
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Old 10-12-2017, 09:11 AM
WOOKINPANUB WOOKINPANUB is online now
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Originally Posted by Grumbacher Red View Post
Euretha? Sounds like another misguided soul who knows just enough anatomy to be dangerous.

I am a RN and worked in Labor & Delivery early in my career. I had a patient in the early 90s who named her daughter Placenta. How do you gently and tactfully talk a new mom out of doing that to her kid? It crosses my mind occasionally that there is a young woman walking around somewhere stuck with that.
Hee! The thing is, as has been said by others, it's the association that dictates what names are "good" or "bad". To me, the actual sound of the word placenta is kind of pretty, as if it were the Spanish word for pleasant or something. However, since we know what it actually means, um, just no. Ditto diarrhea (band name!). It's not bad sounding at all, in and of itself, but obviously you're not going to be encountering a Miss Diarrhea Jones out in the wild any time soon.
  #44  
Old 10-12-2017, 09:12 AM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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Originally Posted by WOOKINPANUB View Post
When a co-worker told us his newborn's name was Samuel, I had to suppress the urge to say "your wife gave birth to an 80 year old man?" . And it's Samuel!!NOT Sam! Oh, please
Actually Samuel is more popular than it has been in the 116 years in this Social Security search. (I can't seem to be able to link to a specific search, but you can do a new one.) In 2016, it was in 21st place. 80 years ago it was in 67th place. (I blame Supernatural.)

Lots of my relatives have biblical names such as Sarah, David, Matthew, James, etc. Other biblical names seem less popular--none of my relatives are named Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Abednigo, or Melchizedek.
  #45  
Old 10-12-2017, 09:14 AM
Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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My cousin's new baby is named Levi. Fine, but we're not Jewish.
  #46  
Old 10-12-2017, 09:18 AM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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Originally Posted by Grumbacher Red View Post
I am a RN and worked in Labor & Delivery early in my career. I had a patient in the early 90s who named her daughter Placenta. How do you gently and tactfully talk a new mom out of doing that to her kid? It crosses my mind occasionally that there is a young woman walking around somewhere stuck with that.
Save your pity for her younger sister, Umbilical Cordelia.

Last edited by Darren Garrison; 10-12-2017 at 09:19 AM.
  #47  
Old 10-12-2017, 09:23 AM
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
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Originally Posted by Dung Beetle View Post
My cousin's new baby is named Levi. Fine, but we're not Jewish.
I know more Fundamental Christians with that name than I know Jews with that name, and I know more Jews than Fundies.

I do, however, know a few kids with the lesser prophets like Zephaniah and Hosea as middle names, and Israel is full of people with really obscure biblical names.

I also have a cousin named Malachi who goes by "Malky" in the US. He has lived a good deal of his life in Israel, and I don't actually know what he was called there.
  #48  
Old 10-12-2017, 09:29 AM
WOOKINPANUB WOOKINPANUB is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
Actually Samuel is more popular than it has been in the 116 years in this Social Security search. (I can't seem to be able to link to a specific search, but you can do a new one.) In 2016, it was in 21st place. 80 years ago it was in 67th place. (I blame Supernatural.)

Lots of my relatives have biblical names such as Sarah, David, Matthew, James, etc. Other biblical names seem less popular--none of my relatives are named Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Abednigo, or Melchizedek.
I figured it must be popular in some circles, which doesn't make it any better. Old man association aside, it's just not a pleasant sounding name. We all refer to him as Sam, or Baby Sam, or Sammy D. Nobody uses his full name when they ask about him.
  #49  
Old 10-12-2017, 09:34 AM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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Originally Posted by WOOKINPANUB View Post
I figured it must be popular in some circles, which doesn't make it any better. Old man association aside, it's just not a pleasant sounding name.
Say that to L. Jackson's face, I dare you!
  #50  
Old 10-12-2017, 09:51 AM
Orwell Orwell is offline
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Originally Posted by RivkahChaya View Post
You aren't allowed to go around spelling other words just any old way you want, and that goes for the names of your children too. Grrrr.
My kids have three female friends named Karly, Carlee and Carly. And Emily and Emilee. But these variants are mild compared to what people are coming up with now.

I realize this isn't entirely new, as I know a few Marcs in addition to lots of Marks. But some of the spellings are just ridiculous.

Quote:
I am a RN and worked in Labor & Delivery early in my career. I had a patient in the early 90s who named her daughter Placenta.
When we had our oldest, one of the other new mothers-to-be at the birthing classes looked at a poster and said "Hmm, Chlamydia would make a pretty name." And, no, she was not joking. I'm hoping someone talked her out of it.
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