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  #51  
Old 10-12-2017, 09:53 AM
DPRK DPRK is offline
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About all the truly odd spellings, are they deliberate, or do the parents have a less than firm grasp of orthographics? Does the kid usually go along with it?
  #52  
Old 10-12-2017, 09:58 AM
WOOKINPANUB WOOKINPANUB is offline
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Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
Say that to L. Jackson's face, I dare you!
Actually, I've always referred to him as "Samuel L." But you're right; he can call himself anything he wants
  #53  
Old 10-12-2017, 10:21 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Originally Posted by Orwell View Post
I don't really care what people name their kids, but I do feel bad that these new people will spend their entire lives having to enunciate and spell their names over and over and over. I think it amounts to a mild form of torture.
Or the kids grow up and legally change their names - it is, after all, an option for any of us to do that at least in the US (Presumably other places, too, but I've only lived here).
  #54  
Old 10-12-2017, 11:48 AM
madsircool madsircool is online now
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Originally Posted by Dung Beetle View Post
My cousin's new baby is named Levi. Fine, but we're not Jewish.
Maybe he was named after the jeans that got him conceived?
  #55  
Old 10-12-2017, 11:56 AM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is online now
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Originally Posted by Orwell View Post
I don't really care what people name their kids, but I do feel bad that these new people will spend their entire lives having to enunciate and spell their names over and over and over. I think it amounts to a mild form of torture.
I have a surname that isn't intuitive to spell nor pronounce, and I've spent my entire life having to do just that. it's a mild inconvenience, at most, and "mild form of torture" overstates things, IMO.
  #56  
Old 10-12-2017, 11:57 AM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is online now
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Originally Posted by DPRK View Post
About all the truly odd spellings, are they deliberate, or do the parents have a less than firm grasp of orthographics? Does the kid usually go along with it?
The sense I've gotten is that parents like the sound of a particular name, but want to give their child a unique spelling of it. So, I suspect, it's deliberate in most cases.
  #57  
Old 10-12-2017, 12:09 PM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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I don't really care what people name their kids, but I do feel bad that these new people will spend their entire lives having to enunciate and spell their names over and over and over. I think it amounts to a mild form of torture.
The Japanese have it worse--knowing how their names are "spelled" doesn't lead to knowing how they are pronounced, and knowing how they are pronounced doesn't lead to knowing how they are "spelled." Imagine every time that you meet someone that the "O" in your name is the "O" from "ostrich", not the "O" from "orange"...
  #58  
Old 10-12-2017, 12:18 PM
madsircool madsircool is online now
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Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
The Japanese have it worse--knowing how their names are "spelled" doesn't lead to knowing how they are pronounced, and knowing how they are pronounced doesn't lead to knowing how they are "spelled." Imagine every time that you meet someone that the "O" in your name is the "O" from "ostrich", not the "O" from "orange"...
This is untrue. Japanese syllables are always pronounced the same. Otoko, onna, otearai the O's are all pronounced the same. Spelling you might have a point because they can be written in kanji or hiragana or katakana.
  #59  
Old 10-12-2017, 12:26 PM
SpoilerVirgin SpoilerVirgin is offline
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Originally Posted by Grumbacher Red View Post
I hear ya, but some names just sound old. Who would look down at a newborn and say they want to call their kid Gladys? Or Ralph, Agnes or Stanley.
I think Agnes is a beautiful name. It always make me think of David Copperfield. Stanley Ann was the name of Barack Obama's mother. I could go for a fad of female Stanleys.
Quote:
I taught at a Technical College for a number of years, and I encountered 3 girls' names over and over. Ashley. Tiffany. Brittany.
The really amusing part is that in 80 years or so, Ashley, Tiffany and Brittany will be the names that sound like old women.
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Originally Posted by SDMB Poster in 2097
Seriously, who would look down at a newborn and want to call their kid Tiffany?
  #60  
Old 10-12-2017, 12:28 PM
Nava Nava is offline
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Without any disrespect to African-Americans, the names I am asking about are the ones that in the last 25 years or so have surfaced with odd to me spellings and unknown origins.
Some examples are-
Jedeveoon, Bonquisha,Tanisha, T'a nay,, Deshaun, Tayshaun, Deron, Rau'shee, Raynell, Deontay, Taraje, Jozy, Kerron, Hyleas, Chaunte, Bershawn, Lashawn, Sanya, Trevell, Sheena, Ogonna, Dremiel , and many others.
Very much not African-Americans, but right know there are quite a few guys in any Hispanic country you care to name and in their 20s named Yerái (including several footballers).

It's the transcription to Spanish of the word Jedi, as it was pronounced in the Spanish dubbing of Star Wars (Chapter IV), which tried to reproduce the English pronunciation; later dubbings changed the pronunciation to match what people had reconverted it to (the Spanish transcription of this new pronunciation would be Yédi).

And I know of at least two little girls called Arya-with-a-y.

Names evolve, as do any other words. Firstnames and brands, even more often than other nouns.

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Originally Posted by RivkahChaya View Post
I know more Fundamental Christians with that name than I know Jews with that name, and I know more Jews than Fundies.
Rebecas my age, their mother liked the song "Sombra de Rebeca". Rebecas under 20, parents are involved in neochatecumenate. Esthers my age, I know one and she was born on March 23rd, feast of St. Esther, Queen (yes, the same Esther celebrated in Purim). There are two among the children in my brother's neochatecumenate group (Esther and Ana Esther).
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Last edited by Nava; 10-12-2017 at 12:32 PM.
  #61  
Old 10-12-2017, 12:53 PM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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Originally Posted by madsircool View Post
Spelling you might have a point because they can be written in kanji or hiragana or katakana.
Spelling is my point because the same kanji can have multiple pronunciations and the same pronunciation can be represented by multiple kanji. I was using the "O" in Orwell as an analogy for having to explain the pronunciation of one or more kanji, not as a literal "O" in an English transliteration.

Last edited by Darren Garrison; 10-12-2017 at 12:56 PM.
  #62  
Old 10-12-2017, 12:55 PM
LSLGuy LSLGuy is online now
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Originally Posted by TriPolar View Post
People should have GUIDs instead of names. Everything will become easier. My GUID is {524n9982-z20q-12f9-g459-416711223421}, but I hate it when people refer to me as simply {524n9982}, I hate that, please don't do it.
A valid GUID is a hexadecimal written form of a 128 bit integer. As such, it can only contain the letters a through f. Standards vary on whether they're rendered all upper or all lower case but the casing carries no difference in meaning.

Sorry: your thoroughly modern, nay, futuristic name does not compute!

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Originally Posted by california jobcase View Post
...
The strangest names of people I have personally met have to include Maleria (she said it was pronounced Mallory, but it sure didn't read that way on her cashier's name tag), Euretha, and Chimera (pr. Sha-mare-uh).
The other day I encountered a 20-ish waitress whose name tag said "Valeria". This being South Florida, her having obvious Hispanic facial features, hair, and skin tone, I assumed it was simply the feminine Spanish form of the English "Valerie". So I pronounced it 'Vah le REE ah" with a hint of rolled r.

She said, in English that made it real obvious both she and her parents were born and raised here, "That's 'Vah LAIR ee uh', like Valerian root without the n."

Oops. Fooled me. She was nice about it and was obviously used to hearing that mistake since she already had her mnemonic ditty all ready to go.

Last edited by LSLGuy; 10-12-2017 at 12:58 PM.
  #63  
Old 10-12-2017, 01:14 PM
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is online now
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Originally Posted by DPRK View Post
About all the truly odd spellings, are they deliberate, or do the parents have a less than firm grasp of orthographics? Does the kid usually go along with it?
Whether the parents have a grasp or orthographics or not, stupid is what they look when they name their kid Chastady, instead of Chastity, or Jurnie instead of Journey, or Mavrik instead of Maverick. It's bad enough when someone can't figure out "Leah," and names the kid Leigha, but if your kid's name is an actual word, you really look like a 10th grade drop-out if it's spelled wrong.
  #64  
Old 10-12-2017, 01:16 PM
WildBlueYonder WildBlueYonder is offline
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Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
One interesting case is Oprah Winfrey. Her birth name was Orpah, but so many people misspelled/mispronounced it that "Oprah" stuck.
I heard they just spelled it wrong on the birth certificate (bc)

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Originally Posted by papaw View Post
I
Some examples are-
Jedeveoon, Bonquisha,Tanisha, T'a nay,, Deshaun, Tayshaun, Deron, Rau'shee, Raynell, Deontay, Taraje, Jozy, Kerron, Hyleas, Chaunte, Bershawn, Lashawn, Sanya, Trevell, Sheena, Ogonna, Dremiel , and many others.
"it is largely and profoundly the legacy of African-Americans," writes Eliza Dinwiddie-Boyd in her baby-naming book "Proud Heritage." Shalondra and Shaday, Jenneta and Jonelle, Michandra and Milika -- in some parts of the country today, nearly a third of African-American girls are given a name belonging to no one else in the state (boys' names tend to be somewhat more conservative).
Why is this so ?
I have a feeling that some people might be changing their named as adults. I'm all for heritage but are those really from the slave days??
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  #65  
Old 10-12-2017, 01:25 PM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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I heard they just spelled it wrong on the birth certificate (bc)
I always heard that, too, but Wikipedia says it the other way.
  #66  
Old 10-12-2017, 01:44 PM
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is offline
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Originally Posted by Dung Beetle View Post
My cousin's new baby is named Levi. Fine, but we're not Jewish.
My evangelical niece named her older son Izaak.
  #67  
Old 10-12-2017, 01:49 PM
Ludovic Ludovic is online now
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Originally Posted by Nava View Post
And I know of at least two little girls called Arya-with-a-y.
One I can understand but two? And I'll bet it gets tiring pronouncing all 5 syllables!
  #68  
Old 10-12-2017, 02:02 PM
Grumbacher Red Grumbacher Red is offline
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Originally Posted by SpoilerVirgin View Post
The really amusing part is that in 80 years or so, Ashley, Tiffany and Brittany will be the names that sound like old women.
Point well taken.

And in 40 years, Lisa, Teresa, Susan, and Karen will be old lady names.

One of my grandmothers was named Evelyn, and one of my cousins named his daughter after her, they call her Evie. I think that was a nice way to modernize it.

I like to read old memoirs with diaries and letters, I am one of those history geeks like that, and one of the best parts is coming across truly colorful old names like Coral, Lota, Asbury, Ignatius, Ambrose, Ulof, Everard, Woodfin, Parmalee, etc... Of course there are plenty of boring old Johns, Williams, Henrys, and James, too. "Colorful" names are nothing new I guess.
  #69  
Old 10-12-2017, 02:19 PM
Grumbacher Red Grumbacher Red is offline
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Originally Posted by WildBlueYonder View Post
I have a feeling that some people might be changing their named as adults. I'm all for heritage but are those really from the slave days??
I think the point of those unconventional names is to sound more African in origin and NOT from the slavery era.

I recall popular names for my black male classmates in the 70s were Demetrius, Darius, DeWayne, Kelvin...oh, and a bunch of Alphonsos.

Other than one girl named CeKeithia, and another one named Aurelia, the black girls, like the white girls, were mostly lost in a sea of Lisas, Teresas, Susans, and Karens.

Damn, those really ARE going to be old lady names in 30-40 years!
  #70  
Old 10-12-2017, 06:13 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is online now
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I've heard more than one story about HCPs freaking out when they find out a woman is named Candida. That's a common Hispanic name, and was also the title of a song by Tony Orlando. It's also not pronounced the same way as the fungal infection.

One of my friends has a daughter who was born before the name "Olivia" really took off, and this name has an alternate spelling that I won't use here because it's unique enough to identify her. I've never had a problem with it because her daughter is this name, and NOT Olivia.
  #71  
Old 10-12-2017, 09:07 PM
astorian astorian is offline
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Matthew McConnaughey named his son Levi, because Levi was another name for St. Matthew, in the Bible.

Anyway, Christians have been giving their kids Biblical Jewish names forever. and nowadays, half the Jewish kids I know have Irish names (lots of Aidan Rosenbergs, Sean Cohens, and Ciara Goldfarbs these days).
  #72  
Old 10-13-2017, 06:30 AM
Nava Nava is offline
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Originally Posted by Ludovic View Post
One I can understand but two? And I'll bet it gets tiring pronouncing all 5 syllables!
It's even worse in Spanish from Spain: Arya con y griega has 6 syllables! But in Mexico (and most of Latin America, I think) it's Arya con ye, so only 4

The name Aria (song) already existed before the Game of Thrones variant and had a recent peak in popularity due to a Spanish series. Mothers currently naming the baby either one are so used to being asked which is it that they directly tell you "with i" or "with y".
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Last edited by Nava; 10-13-2017 at 06:32 AM.
  #73  
Old 10-13-2017, 06:14 PM
Omega Glory Omega Glory is offline
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Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
Forget about ever getting a job with a name like that, assuming you stay out of jail long enough to ever apply for one.

(well, it's true)
If by true you mean racist, then yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by papaw View Post
I guess I am asking the wrong question.
Without any disrespect to African-Americans, the names I am asking about are the ones that in the last 25 years or so have surfaced with odd to me spellings and unknown origins.
Some examples are-
Jedeveoon, Bonquisha,Tanisha, T'a nay,, Deshaun, Tayshaun, Deron, Rau'shee, Raynell, Deontay, Taraje, Jozy, Kerron, Hyleas, Chaunte, Bershawn, Lashawn, Sanya, Trevell, Sheena, Ogonna, Dremiel , and many others.
"it is largely and profoundly the legacy of African-Americans," writes Eliza Dinwiddie-Boyd in her baby-naming book "Proud Heritage." Shalondra and Shaday, Jenneta and Jonelle, Michandra and Milika -- in some parts of the country today, nearly a third of African-American girls are given a name belonging to no one else in the state (boys' names tend to be somewhat more conservative).
Why is this so ?
If you wanted a large variety of real answers on this, you've come to the wrong place since this is not a very diverse board. Why? Americans of all races put a big emphasis on their ancestral culture. People feel connected to Ireland and Italy etc. even if their family left generations ago. African Americans didn't get the opportunity to know where their ancestors came from until relatively recently, thanks to the rise of ancestral DNA testing. So some people made up names that they thought sounded African, and some people made up names because they thought they sounded pretty. Then other people adopted some of those names, and they spread. Names like Lashawn, Tanisha and Deontay, for example, don't even strike me as unusual. They've been in widespread use for years. It's become a tradition. It's a new tradition, but it's no less valid than any other.
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