View Poll Results: Do you like bread pudding?
Yes. 129 83.77%
No. 19 12.34%
I don't know, I've never tried it. I might if I had the chance. 3 1.95%
I don't know, I've never tried it...and I wouldn't, looks or seems too disgusting to me. 3 1.95%
Voters: 154. You may not vote on this poll

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  #51  
Old 09-14-2017, 08:17 PM
Shagnasty Shagnasty is offline
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Originally Posted by Elemenopy View Post
I don't really care for it. If I want that sort of flavor, I'd rather have a good cinnamon roll or coffee cake, not dressed up leftovers* as dessert.
Not all bread pudding tastes like a cinnamon roll or coffee cake. New Orleans has its own versions that the vast majority of people love. It typically has a bourbon or rum sauce to go with it that is exquisite when prepared correctly. It is definitely distinctive tasting whether you like it or not and tastes nothing like a Cinnabon or coffee cake. The hotel I used to work in made a famous version that I used to be sent to serve to VIP's at high-end fund raisers and, judging by people's reactions, they really, really liked it.

I should have asked for the full recipe or saw the whole process of it being made - only the end result and it was outstanding. There were other establishments that also claimed the title of best bread pudding and I had those too. It was kind of hard to tell because they were all so excellent. There wasn't anything "leftover" about them.

Here are some versions:
http://www.neworleansrestaurants.com.../bread-pudding

Last edited by Shagnasty; 09-14-2017 at 08:22 PM.
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  #52  
Old 09-14-2017, 08:26 PM
Aspenglow Aspenglow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunny Daze View Post
Can we claim french toast as a one layer bread pudding?
I'm cool with that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gkster View Post
I love bread pudding, with raisins or without. Sometimes I make it with Craisins or slices of apple.
My pear tree produces prodigious amounts of fruit about every other year. I don't much care for canned pears, so after I've had my fill of fresh ones, I dehydrate the rest. Dried pears are addictive, and one of my favorite things to do with them is to chop and add them to a bread pudding. I'll bet you'd like that version, too.
  #53  
Old 09-14-2017, 08:48 PM
StGermain StGermain is offline
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No, which is funny, because I like french toast, and to me, bread pudding is just french toast casserole. I think it's a textural thing.

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  #54  
Old 09-14-2017, 09:45 PM
Elemenopy Elemenopy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shagnasty View Post
Not all bread pudding tastes like a cinnamon roll or coffee cake. New Orleans has its own versions that the vast majority of people love. It typically has a bourbon or rum sauce to go with it that is exquisite when prepared correctly. It is definitely distinctive tasting whether you like it or not and tastes nothing like a Cinnabon or coffee cake. The hotel I used to work in made a famous version that I used to be sent to serve to VIP's at high-end fund raisers and, judging by people's reactions, they really, really liked it.

I should have asked for the full recipe or saw the whole process of it being made - only the end result and it was outstanding. There were other establishments that also claimed the title of best bread pudding and I had those too. It was kind of hard to tell because they were all so excellent. There wasn't anything "leftover" about them.
I totally hear what you are saying...however...the first time I spent Christmas morn
ing at my inlaws in NOLA I was told I made that and the cheese grits better than anyone. Pretty good for a know-nothing Yank, I guess, but I felt like I was just polishing a turd.
  #55  
Old 09-14-2017, 10:08 PM
burpo the wonder mutt burpo the wonder mutt is offline
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Oh, hell, yeah; every version is dy-no-mite!

Hey, you got some? I could send you an address. You know, take it off yer hands for you.

Last edited by burpo the wonder mutt; 09-14-2017 at 10:09 PM.
  #56  
Old 09-14-2017, 10:43 PM
Bayard Bayard is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCube View Post
Maybe it's just me, but I would call "savory bread pudding" dressing or stuffing. And not pudding at all. Pudding is desert, and therefore sweet.
Yeah, I can see that. But the savory bread puddings I make usually have a lot of eggs and cheese and sometimes greens like spinach or kale, which I don't associate with stuffing (I guess traditional Thanksgiving stuffing has eggs, but savory bread pudding tends to be more eggy). Stuffing seems to me to be sort of looser or more crumbly, while a savory bread pudding is more dense. YMMV, and apparently it does.

As far as whether the term "pudding" can only be applied to desserts, generally I agree, but I don't know what else to call a dense egg-and-bread thing that's not sweet and not stuffing. Plus, I only learned to make them from Mark Bittman, and that's what he calls them. Also, as a vegetarian, I want it to be known that you can have your pudding even if you don't eat your meat.
  #57  
Old 09-15-2017, 12:06 AM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is online now
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"Bread pudding" is really more of a breakfast food than a dessert, for me.

Allow me to clarify:

I grew up in a Southern California suburb during the 60s, as one of ten children of a SAHM and a working-class dad. My parents were not Plains Indians, but the concept of using "every part of the buffalo" cerrtainly resonated with them. I'm unsure if Mom ever dealt with the stereotype of children who refused to eat the heels of a loaf of bread, or if she was simply taking no chances, but on the top of our refrigerator was a large brown-paper grocery store bag, and into this bag would go the aforementioned heels. In the several weeks that it took to fill the bag, those crusts of bread staled up nicely.

Once the bag was full, Mom would wait for the next Saturday morning. Into a large pot, she would put a quart or two of milk, a cup of sugar, a tablespoon of vanilla extract, and half a pound of raisins. Then she would break the stale bread crusts into the milk as she stirred and heated it. That would be our breakfast for Saturday morning, as well as our mid-morning snack.

Bread-and-milk was not as popular with some of my youngerr siblings. I suspect this is because, as the older ones aged and moved out, it took longer and longer for the remaining kids to finish off a batch.

So while I realize that our breakfast wasn't bread pudding, per se, these days, it's hardly ever my dessert choice when I see it in the menu.
  #58  
Old 09-15-2017, 03:36 AM
MrDibble MrDibble is offline
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I love bread pudding, with nuts and fresh and dried fruit. Bread pudding with golden sultanas, chopped hazelnuts and fresh black cherries, yumm. When we have fresh cherries, I prefer to make clafoutis, but not all the fam likes that (why, I have no idea!), so a cherry bread pudding is a reasonable compromise.


Quote:
Originally Posted by kaylasdad99 View Post
In the several weeks that it took to fill the bag
(my emphasis)
sounds more like a recipe for mycelium pudding.

Last edited by MrDibble; 09-15-2017 at 03:37 AM.
  #59  
Old 09-15-2017, 09:33 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Originally Posted by Clothahump View Post
Yes. But for some reason, people started putting raisins in it. SWMBO is from New Orleans and she turns her nose up at "dead-fly" bread pudding.
Interesting. Life-long New Orleanian ... here to say that bread pudding is a well-loved local classic. Lots of people make it lots of different ways, it's true. But around here, bread pudding with raisins is the definitive version. Others' MMV, it seems.
  #60  
Old 09-15-2017, 11:11 AM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Hmmm..."savory bread pudding"..."Mark Bittman"....

OH! You mean strata!

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/...-and-mushrooms

I'm mainly seen strata as a breakfast dish at country inns and B&Bs. The host can cook the ham and eggs and toast (and mushrooms, peppers, onions, whatever) all together in one big casserole, and save the trouble of making individual dishes.
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  #61  
Old 09-15-2017, 11:19 AM
Max Torque Max Torque is offline
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Bread pudding is awesome, and raisins elevate it to greater heights of awesomeness. Optimally, the raisins need a pre-soak to plump them up before they're added to the pudding. Little stuff like that is what changes good to great.
  #62  
Old 09-15-2017, 11:29 AM
Leaffan Leaffan is offline
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Bread pudding: is this strictly an American (USA) thing?

Serious question.

(I've never had it, but we were never dessert people.)
  #63  
Old 09-15-2017, 11:38 AM
sitchensis sitchensis is offline
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It's okay but it's never the best option. I'd rather have French toast.
  #64  
Old 09-15-2017, 12:14 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
Bread pudding: is this strictly an American (USA) thing?
It's one way of using up stale bread. I wouldn't say Americans were any thriftier than anyone else. I would rather have meatballs, myself.
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  #65  
Old 09-15-2017, 12:27 PM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
Bread pudding: is this strictly an American (USA) thing?

Serious question.

(I've never had it, but we were never dessert people.)
:shrug:

The 15 Best Places for a Bread Pudding in Toronto
  #66  
Old 09-15-2017, 01:21 PM
Skammer Skammer is offline
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Good bread pudding is amazing. Sadly, not all bread pudding is good.
  #67  
Old 09-15-2017, 08:07 PM
gkster gkster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aspenglow View Post
My pear tree produces prodigious amounts of fruit about every other year. I don't much care for canned pears, so after I've had my fill of fresh ones, I dehydrate the rest. Dried pears are addictive, and one of my favorite things to do with them is to chop and add them to a bread pudding. I'll bet you'd like that version, too.
Yesss!!!!

As for bread pudding being American? I've had it in Latin America where it's known as budin de pan (literally bread pudding)
According to this site in the UK, the type that Americans like is what Britons call "bread and butter pudding", and UK bread pudding is drier
https://christinascucina.com/aunt-ro...utter-pudding/

Here's a BBC recipe that calls for the pudding to be cut into square slices when cooked; from the picture it looks like a dry cake.
https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/13355/bread-pudding
  #68  
Old 09-15-2017, 08:25 PM
Murderface Murderface is offline
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YES, bread pudding is where it's at.
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  #69  
Old 09-15-2017, 08:53 PM
CelticKnot CelticKnot is offline
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I have never met a bread pudding I didn't like. It's just hardly available here.
Bread pudding is often served with some kind of hard sauce. I found a bread pudding at a grocery store bakery but didn't want to hassle with making a sauce, and was inspired. Eggnog flavor ice cream is the perfect replacement for hard sauce on a warm dessert. I've only seen it available during the winter holiday season, but is also perfect for the mincemeat pie I must have at Thanksgiving. And I don't have to buy a bottle of liquor that will sit in a cabinet for a year, or cook.
  #70  
Old 09-15-2017, 08:55 PM
burpo the wonder mutt burpo the wonder mutt is offline
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^ You. Are. A. Genius.
  #71  
Old 09-15-2017, 09:09 PM
CelticKnot CelticKnot is offline
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Approved by SDMB! My weekend is made!
  #72  
Old 09-15-2017, 10:57 PM
Mudshark Mudshark is offline
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I love it, but no raisins. I'll eat it with the raisins, but when I make it, no raisins.
  #73  
Old 09-15-2017, 11:18 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
Bread pudding: is this strictly an American (USA) thing?

Serious question.

(I've never had it, but we were never dessert people.)
There's variants of it across a wide spectrum of cuisines. Wikipedia claims its origins are English, but I imagine pretty much any culture with bread will have come up with some sort of bread pudding as a use for stale bread at some time. (The Polish version, for instance, is not baked, but made with bread, poppy seeds, sugar, and milk and then maybe nuts, raisins, a liqueur of some sort, butter, cream, honey, etc. Not necessarily all or even most of those. The simplest kind could just be the basic four ingrients.)
  #74  
Old 09-16-2017, 08:54 AM
aruvqan aruvqan is offline
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
A savory custard is a heavenly thing. I do a dish of artichoke bottoms baked in egg and cream that is so French it sings the Marsellaise when you take it out of the oven.
That sounds wonderful. I have a bag of frozen artichoke bases, might try combining with a torn up sourdough boule, some chopped bacon, some chopped brie and egg custard [fines herbes blend for seasoning with some cracked black pepper and maybe minced garlic]

What is the recipe you use for your artichokes in egg and cream?
  #75  
Old 09-16-2017, 12:13 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Originally Posted by aruvqan View Post
That sounds wonderful. I have a bag of frozen artichoke bases, might try combining with a torn up sourdough boule, some chopped bacon, some chopped brie and egg custard [fines herbes blend for seasoning with some cracked black pepper and maybe minced garlic]

What is the recipe you use for your artichokes in egg and cream?
I had a fire in my house seven months ago, and we STILL don't have a functioning dining or living room, and 50% of my cookbooks are in storage. If it helps, it's from 1984's THE VOGUE COOKBOOK (don't judge me; I bought it secondhand):

https://www.amazon.com/Vogue-French-...vogue+cookbook

I remember only beaten eggs with light cream, salt and pepper, and artichoke bottoms baked en casserole in a slow oven until the custard set. Maybe you can call it up online. It's the very first recipe in the legumes chapter.
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  #76  
Old 09-17-2017, 01:50 PM
jsgoddess jsgoddess is offline
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Inspired by this thread, I had to make bread pudding today. Excellent stuff.
  #77  
Old 09-17-2017, 03:36 PM
Two Many Cats Two Many Cats is offline
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I voted no, but that's because I know I've had it before, but I can't remember what it was like. That tells me I didn't hate it, but I didn't love it either. I've had bread pudding at least two or three times, so it's strictly meh to me.
  #78  
Old 09-18-2017, 04:27 AM
MrDibble MrDibble is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
Bread pudding: is this strictly an American (USA) thing?
Nope, definitely not.
  #79  
Old 09-18-2017, 10:11 AM
DesertDog DesertDog is offline
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Originally Posted by Drunky Smurf View Post
Just make your own it's really easy.

Let some bread go stale.
Then cover and soak in water.
Sprinkle cinnamon on top.

Eat.
<Strikes DS off his list of people to get recipes from.>

Quote:
Originally Posted by bordelond View Post
Interesting. Life-long New Orleanian ... here to say that bread pudding is a well-loved local classic. Lots of people make it lots of different ways, it's true. But around here, bread pudding with raisins is the definitive version. Others' MMV, it seems.
Ages ago, Joe Sagreto, founder of the New Orleans School of Cooking, was giving cooking demos/lectures aboard the Delta Queen on a Thanksgiving cruise from NOLA to Natchez and back. One of them was on bread pudding and he asserted that so many restaurants in the Big Easy offer it because they're trying to compete with a lot of grandmothers. He then said, "I used to say that you could make it out of anything but..." and launched into an anecdote about how he gave a half dozen can't miss recipes including bread pudding to a friend who'd signed on as cook on an oil platform in the Gulf -- there's no place to hide from a crew angry at the cook. A month later he was back.

"So how'd it go?"

"Wonderful! They loved this and that and the other thing."

"...but not the bread pudding?"

"Well, you said you could make it out of anything, right?"

"...Yeah?"

"Well, I had some left-over jalapeño cornbread. They'd get a raisin on one side and a bit of jalapeño on the other and I think it confused 'em."

About then a woman in the audience piped up, "How about an egg and cheese base instead of egg and cinnamon?"

"Hmmm..." and you could see the wheels turning in his head.
  #80  
Old 09-18-2017, 10:30 AM
jsgoddess jsgoddess is offline
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I was all-in on using the jalapeno cornbread until you mentioned raisins.
  #81  
Old 09-18-2017, 10:43 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Originally Posted by DesertDog View Post
About then a woman in the audience piped up, "How about an egg and cheese base instead of egg and cinnamon?"

"Hmmm..." and you could see the wheels turning in his head.
That sounds pretty good as a savory dish.
  #82  
Old 09-18-2017, 10:45 AM
running coach running coach is offline
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Originally Posted by jsgoddess View Post
I was all-in on using the jalapeno cornbread until you mentioned raisins.
It's even better if you saute the jalapenos.

*flees*
  #83  
Old 09-18-2017, 02:34 PM
Aspenglow Aspenglow is offline
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Originally Posted by jsgoddess View Post
Inspired by this thread, I had to make bread pudding today. Excellent stuff.
Got me yesterday, too. Made it for dessert last night and had a slice for breakfast this morning. Delish!!
  #84  
Old Yesterday, 10:10 AM
butler1850 butler1850 is offline
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I thought for years that it was a vile substance... wouldn't even try it or look in it's direction.

Then someone introduced me to "Baked french toast." I later found out that it was nothing more than whole-slice instead of chunked-slice bread pudding.

It's now among my favorite things to do with leftover bread (when that happens).
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