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Old 12-04-2010, 01:04 PM
snowmonky snowmonky is offline
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Rent Prices for 1 Bedroom and Rent Prices for 1 Bedroom Split with 2 People

I was wondering how much the difference between one bedroom 1 tenant and one bedroom 2 tenants would be. I know that 2 tenants end up paying more than that 1 tenant, but I want to know the difference in rent allowed for same room.
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Old 12-04-2010, 01:11 PM
running coach running coach is offline
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It will depend on where you are. Local market, rent controls, etc.
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Old 12-04-2010, 01:29 PM
snowmonky snowmonky is offline
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I read somewhere a week ago giving some guidelines on rent prices. Like you increase $100 or something for each tenant if it's 2 for room rather than 1 person.

$450 per person for 2 = 900
vs
$800 per person for 1 = 800
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Old 12-04-2010, 02:26 PM
Hello Again Hello Again is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowmonky View Post
I was wondering how much the difference between one bedroom 1 tenant and one bedroom 2 tenants would be. I know that 2 tenants end up paying more than that 1 tenant, but I want to know the difference in rent allowed for same room.
This depends on local market, and charging more per tenant is, in my experience, most common in college towns. It is by no means universal that 2 tenants pay more than one. In NYC, for example, it is not the norm, it is actually indirectly against the law. The price for the apartment is the price for the apartment. It is illegal for the landlord to restrict occupancy to the person on the lease, although they can enforce laws about maximum occupancy. In general, the named tenant is permitted to share the apartment with at least one other person, and their dependents. Cite: NY Real Property Law 235-f.

So, if I sign a lease for $X, and then the next day my boyfriend moves in, the landlord cannot raise the rent (because we signed the lease already) nor can he forbid my boyfriend from occupancy (because I am entitled to at least one additional occupant).

If you are in an area where there is no regulation on this matter (and I wouldn't assume it's legal just because lots of local landlords do it -- you can contact your local tenants union for more info on that) and charging more per tenant is the norm, you an probably figure out a market rate by looking for rent ads in the paper and seeing what is reasonable in the market.
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Old 12-04-2010, 03:00 PM
snowmonky snowmonky is offline
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Very informative. Thank you.
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Old 12-04-2010, 03:03 PM
Pasta Pasta is offline
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Definitely impossible to give a generic answer. In my area, rent does not typically vary with occupancy.

Rental markets are very local in their characteristics.
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Old 12-04-2010, 08:12 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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I would think if the landlord pays for any (or all) of the utilities (gas, water, electricity, garbage pickup, etc) it would be more for more people.
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