Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #201  
Old 09-17-2017, 09:30 PM
River Hippie River Hippie is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: N.E. Indiana, USA
Posts: 4,808
I always notice when a British person tacks on the unnecessary (to my reasoning) time.

AE: "I'll be there in ten minutes."

BE: "I'll be there in ten minutes time."
Advertisements  
  #202  
Old 09-17-2017, 09:31 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 40,851
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
To this American, "geezer" definitely implies advanced age, but does not imply anything at all about frailty. You can have a tottering old geezer or a tough old geezer. And in the case of "tough old geezer", there's definitely an undertone of respect.
To me, in US English, "geezer" connotes a grumpy old man.
  #203  
Old 09-17-2017, 11:02 PM
cochrane cochrane is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: The Nekkid Pueblo
Posts: 18,321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Kitchen View Post
American waitresses of a certain age will call their customers "honey" or "sweetie".
Or "Shug." (Short for "Sugar."
  #204  
Old 09-19-2017, 06:42 AM
Green Bean Green Bean is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: NJ, Exit #137
Posts: 11,819
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
Various ways to resurrect a "plural you":

You-uns [yunz or yinz], as already noted in Pittsburg area.

Yous or Yous guys; New Joisey

Y'all --> All y'all; various parts of the south

No, normal people don't say "youse guys" in New Jersey. Nor do we say "bada bing bada boom." Or "Joisey," for that matter.

I've only ever heard youse guys used once, by a school lunch lady on Long Island* in 1978 or so. I remember it because I went home and asked my mommy what she was on about.** Never heard it in "in the wild" again.

"Y'all" is common, even outside the South. "Yinz" was definitely in use in Pittsburgh, at least amongst working-class folks in the early '90s when I lived there - though I think it was typically avoided because "Yinzer" had become a negative stereotype.

* Long Island is indeed pronounced Lawn Guyland by natives, though not in such an exaggerated way.
** Deliberate use of a British-ism there. We would say "what she was talking about" instead.

Last edited by Green Bean; 09-19-2017 at 06:44 AM.
  #205  
Old 09-19-2017, 07:07 AM
Aspidistra Aspidistra is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 4,195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Green Bean View Post
No, normal people don't say "youse guys" in New Jersey.
You have to come to Australia for that one...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Green Bean View Post
Nor do we say "bada bing bada boom." Or "Joisey," for that matter.
...but there, I got nothin'
  #206  
Old 09-19-2017, 07:12 AM
Ludovic Ludovic is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: America's Wing
Posts: 26,769
Perhaps not *subtle* but while evacuating from Irma I listened to the Beeb overnight on my 22(!) hour drive from Melbourne to Louisville and some - but not all - announcers pronounced the name of the next hurricane as "Joe-zay". Which made me cringe but then I realized that the American pronunciation of "Hoe-zay" probably makes Spanish speakers cringe equally.
  #207  
Old 09-19-2017, 07:53 AM
LSLGuy LSLGuy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Southeast Florida USA
Posts: 19,373
Quote:
Originally Posted by Green Bean View Post
No, normal people don't say ... Or "Joisey," for that matter.

I've only ever heard youse guys used once, by a school lunch lady on Long Island* ...

* Long Island is indeed pronounced Lawn Guyland by natives, though not in such an exaggerated way.
...
And many New Jerseyians totally do say "Joisey", though not in such an exaggerated way.

Or at least that's what it sounds like to most people from elsewhere.

Last edited by LSLGuy; 09-19-2017 at 07:53 AM.
  #208  
Old 09-19-2017, 10:13 AM
Chronos Chronos is online now
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 71,678
Back in college, I had a roommate from New Jersey, and in most regards, his accent was basically just the Wonder Bread newscaster accent that you could hear anywhere in America... except that he called the compartment you pull out in a dresser a "draw", instead of a "drawer". I'm not sure if he thought it was spelled "draw", or knew the spelling and was just eliding the final R.
  #209  
Old 09-19-2017, 11:35 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 40,851
"Youse" and "youse guys" is definitely used among some (sub)dialects in Chicago. I will occasionally use it in the phrase "Hey, whatchoose guys up to?" "Youse" is far more common. I could swear I've heard it in the New York metro area, but there's just so many accents out there.

Last edited by pulykamell; 09-19-2017 at 11:37 AM.
  #210  
Old 09-19-2017, 01:21 PM
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Citrus Heights, CA, USA
Posts: 13,174
Quote:
"Y'all" is common, even outside the South. "Yinz" was definitely in use in Pittsburgh, at least amongst working-class folks in the early '90s when I lived there - though I think it was typically avoided because "Yinzer" had become a negative stereotype.
I had a roommate in the Air Force from Youngstown, Ohio who sayd "yunz".

When I was going to college, there was a guy in one of my classes from Southern Georgia, who spoke with what would almost have qualified as a New Jersey/Brooklyn accent, with the "joisey" pronunciation.
  #211  
Old 09-19-2017, 03:50 PM
gigi gigi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Flatlander in NH
Posts: 24,367
Quote:
Originally Posted by River Hippie View Post
I always notice when a British person tacks on the unnecessary (to my reasoning) time.

AE: "I'll be there in ten minutes."

BE: "I'll be there in ten minutes time."
But does it then become "ten minutes' time"?
  #212  
Old 09-20-2017, 02:47 AM
MrDibble MrDibble is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Cape Town, South Africa &
Posts: 21,094
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
except that he called the compartment you pull out in a dresser a "draw", instead of a "drawer".
Oh, that's how we say it here as well - so it's a "chest of draws" - even though you'll write "chest of drawers"
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:59 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2017 Sun-Times Media, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017