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  #51  
Old 03-22-2017, 06:11 PM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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Originally Posted by OsageOrange View Post
If you only want drawn animation, no soap for me...but if stop-motion animation a la Rankin-Bass is okay, then I miss "Rudolph' Shiny New Year" and "Nestor, The Long-eared Christmas Donkey."
Don't they still show the Rudolph new year special on CBS? I remember seeing it again just a couple of years ago. Could have been a download, I suppose. The donkey one I had forgotten even existed.


There is short film called "Snowman in July" that I used to see occasionally on a local morning kidís show. Haven't seen that one in decades until I looked it up on Youtube. Never suspected that it was actually a German film made deep inside of WWII. Hereís the version I remembered, and hereís the original German.
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  #52  
Old 03-22-2017, 07:57 PM
Senegoid Senegoid is online now
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Bambi Meets Godzilla, Marv Newland, 1969.
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  #53  
Old 03-22-2017, 08:44 PM
stillownedbysetters stillownedbysetters is offline
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Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post

How many of you got together with your family specifically to watch the California Raisins Claymation Christmas Special?
Me! Me! For our family, it wouldn't be Christmas without the Raisins.
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  #54  
Old 03-23-2017, 09:47 AM
Uncle Jocko Uncle Jocko is offline
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Me! Me! For our family, it wouldn't be Christmas without the Raisins.
I concur! The scene with the skating walruses and the penguins never fails to send me into hysterics, and I also love Quasimodo conducting Carol of the Bells.

We had a VHS tape with bunches of holiday specials recorded off TV when our kids were small, and I burned it to DVD a few years ago. The Raisins was one of those, as well as 'Twas The Night Before Christmas with the mice and the smartypants mouse kid who almost ruined Christmas by writing a letter to Santa telling him he wasn't real ... nobody caught the logic flaw in that?

Last edited by Uncle Jocko; 03-23-2017 at 09:48 AM..
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  #55  
Old 03-23-2017, 11:41 AM
txjim txjim is offline
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Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
<snip>
How many of you got together with your family specifically to watch the California Raisins Claymation Christmas Special?
It would be on my annual viewing schedule, right after A Charlie Brown Christmas if I had it on DVD. Thanks for the link! Here we come a waffling....
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  #56  
Old 03-23-2017, 12:29 PM
MovieMogul MovieMogul is offline
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Originally Posted by Uncle Jocko View Post

'Twas The Night Before Christmas with the mice and the smartypants mouse kid who almost ruined Christmas by writing a letter to Santa telling him he wasn't real ... nobody caught the logic flaw in that?
He didn't write the letter to Santa; he wrote it to the editor of the newspaper which published it and that's where Santa read it.

One of my favorite Xmas special songs was from that show (sung by Joel Grey): "Even a Miracle Needs a Plan"


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  #57  
Old 03-23-2017, 12:37 PM
Earl Snake-Hips Tucker Earl Snake-Hips Tucker is offline
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The Enormous Egg (1968), about an egg that hatches into a triceratops.
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  #58  
Old 03-23-2017, 12:53 PM
msmith537 msmith537 is online now
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Ahh, the good old days when Rankin-Bass dominated the Christmas special animation market with an iron grip.

Peter Jackson's Hobbit and Lord of the Rings films were OK. But there was just a disturbing lack of rotoscoped orcs in them. And they didn't even sing!


Pretty sure we'll never see the 70s animated version of The Lion, The Witch & The Wardobe again (not Rankin-Bass).
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  #59  
Old 03-23-2017, 03:53 PM
Uncle Jocko Uncle Jocko is offline
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Originally Posted by MovieMogul View Post
He didn't write the letter to Santa; he wrote it to the editor of the newspaper which published it and that's where Santa read it.

One of my favorite Xmas special songs was from that show (sung by Joel Grey): "Even a Miracle Needs a Plan"


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D'oh! Of course that's right. That's what I get trying to recall an animated Christmas special from 1974 ... (that I may or may not have watched as recently as last holiday season ... don't judge me!).

Last edited by Uncle Jocko; 03-23-2017 at 03:53 PM..
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  #60  
Old 03-23-2017, 05:23 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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Originally Posted by Senegoid View Post
Bambi Meets Godzilla, Marv Newland, 1969.
Marv Newland, produced by Mr. and Mrs. Newland.

I used to see it on the old "Night Flight" - anyone remember that show?
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  #61  
Old 03-23-2017, 05:30 PM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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Originally Posted by jayjay View Post
A Cosmic Christmas

A vague memory of the ET wise men haunted me for years until I had the opportunity to look it up when the internet got big.
Never heard of that one before, but watched it last night. The intent was good, I suppose, but it is very uneven, and I can see why it did not become a beloved classic. (Also, I see that it is an early work by the same studio that made the Boba Fett segment of The Star Wars Christmas Special.)
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  #62  
Old 03-23-2017, 06:26 PM
Melbourne Melbourne is offline
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Originally Posted by Senegoid View Post
Bambi Meets Godzilla, Marv Newland, 1969.
I had heard about that for years before I saw it. So when it came on, I settled down to watch it.

I wasn't disapointed.
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  #63  
Old 03-23-2017, 06:28 PM
Spoons Spoons is offline
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The Night the Animals Talked. (Wikipedia link.)

Shown only four times on ABC, from 1970 to 1973, never since; and never released on VHS or DVD. But apparently, now available on YouTube.
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  #64  
Old 03-23-2017, 06:48 PM
Melbourne Melbourne is offline
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Hooves of fire (Robbie the reindeer).

It's not as old as most of the others mentioned here, but it managed to go from being shown to being not shown, without going through 'classic'.

Perhaps it didn't age as well because it references "Chariots of Fire" instead of "A Christmas Carol", but I liked it. (Never heard the American voice-overs, only the English version).
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  #65  
Old 03-23-2017, 07:33 PM
burpo the wonder mutt burpo the wonder mutt is offline
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Originally Posted by Earl Snake-Hips Tucker View Post
The Enormous Egg (1968), about an egg that hatches into a triceratops.
Hey, Earl, just so I can be sure I'm not going loopy, that wasn't animated, right? I mean, I was a sprout when I first saw it, but I would swear it was live action.
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  #66  
Old 03-23-2017, 08:59 PM
ChockFullOfHeadyGoodness ChockFullOfHeadyGoodness is offline
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Originally Posted by Dendarii Dame View Post
I enjoyed the music of Olive, the Other Reindeer. It was based on a picture book. Olive is a dog.
Cartoon Network used to show this one several times every December up until a few years ago. Probably lost the rights, and as far as I can tell, no other network has picked them up. It was our family's viewing tradition, and it's gone. (No, going to Target, buying the DVD and popping it in at home doesn't count. Just like A Charlie Brown Christmas just isn't right without ads for Dolly Madison snacks.) I search the channel guide every December, and it's just not there.

I remember watching a number of Dr. Seuss adaptations from the 1970s. None of them had the staying power of The Grinch. There was The Cat in the Hat, The Lorax (which got reissued when the CGI adaptation came out a few years ago), and several others.

I dimly remember a Ziggy adaptation in the early 1980s. Ziggy didn't talk.
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  #67  
Old 03-23-2017, 09:35 PM
Earl Snake-Hips Tucker Earl Snake-Hips Tucker is offline
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Originally Posted by burpo the wonder mutt View Post
Hey, Earl, just so I can be sure I'm not going loopy, that wasn't animated, right? I mean, I was a sprout when I first saw it, but I would swear it was live action.
Yeah, I think you're right. I think I'm conflating it with a 'Gumby' ep where he (somehow) encounters a triceratops (named 'Trixie').
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  #68  
Old 03-23-2017, 09:55 PM
nightshadea nightshadea is online now
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Originally Posted by OsageOrange View Post
If you only want drawn animation, no soap for me...but if stop-motion animation a la Rankin-Bass is okay, then I miss "Rudolph' Shiny New Year" and "Nestor, The Long-eared Christmas Donkey." And come to think of it, there is a cel-animated special we never see anymore...a cartoon version of "The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe." Among other things, that one got Fenris Ulf's name right. No other production has ever done that. The animation was done in pretty simple lines, but that just made Aslan look more authoritative and a little scary.
you can get all of the Rankin bass Christmas specials from warner's in various multi disc collections
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  #69  
Old 03-24-2017, 05:44 AM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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Originally Posted by ChockFullOfHeadyGoodness View Post
Cartoon Network used to show this one several times every December up until a few years ago.
I thought you must be mistaken on that, since it was only made a few years ago. So I googled, and it was made in 1999? Holy crap, Olive the Other Reindeer is old enough to vote!

Quote:
I remember watching a number of Dr. Seuss adaptations from the 1970s.
There's also Horton Hears a Who. I have that one on DVD, because it was a double-feature with How the Grinch Stole Christmas (the originals of both, not the remakes.)

(As an aside, I've always if "lorax" was supposed to be a pun on "hyrax." Never found an answer, though.)
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  #70  
Old 03-24-2017, 06:11 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Originally Posted by MovieMogul View Post
One of my favorite Xmas special songs was from that show (sung by Joel Grey): "Even a Miracle Needs a Plan"
It's one of your favorites, and you didn't notice that the lyric is "hand"?
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  #71  
Old 03-24-2017, 08:20 AM
psychonaut psychonaut is offline
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Damn, I thought this thread was going to be about some new series of animated TV movies spun off of Lost.
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  #72  
Old 03-24-2017, 01:19 PM
furryman furryman is offline
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Damn, I thought this thread was going to be about some new series of animated TV movies spun off of Lost.
In this episode Scooby and the gang investigate the mystery of the bunker.
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  #73  
Old 03-24-2017, 01:46 PM
Kimballkid Kimballkid is offline
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Zoinks!

Last edited by Kimballkid; 03-24-2017 at 01:47 PM..
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  #74  
Old 03-24-2017, 04:49 PM
Just Asking Questions Just Asking Questions is offline
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Originally Posted by Melbourne View Post
I had heard about that for years before I saw it. So when it came on, I settled down to watch it.

I wasn't disapointed.
(emphasis mine)

You should have been, if you made a big tub of popcorn, and pop, and candy.

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  #75  
Old 03-25-2017, 03:38 AM
Jeep's Phoenix Jeep's Phoenix is offline
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Originally Posted by nightshadea View Post
you can get all of the Rankin bass Christmas specials from warner's in various multi disc collections
Be forewarned though, most DVD versions of "Frosty the Snowman" also contain the abomination that is "Frosty Returns".
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  #76  
Old 03-25-2017, 11:52 AM
jayjay jayjay is offline
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Be forewarned though, most DVD versions of "Frosty the Snowman" also contain the abomination that is "Frosty Returns".
They gotta get rid of it somehow...
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  #77  
Old 03-25-2017, 08:06 PM
Melbourne Melbourne is offline
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Originally Posted by Just Asking Questions View Post
(emphasis mine)

You should have been, if you made a big tub of popcorn, and pop, and candy.

The big build up could have spoiled the experience, but I hadn't understood/processed the critical structural point of the story arc...

...so I got to appreciate it without the weight of accurate preconceptions

Last edited by Melbourne; 03-25-2017 at 08:08 PM..
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  #78  
Old 03-31-2017, 06:22 AM
DLuxN8R-13 DLuxN8R-13 is offline
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There was Cricket On The Hearth, a pretty lame Christmas cartoon with the voices of Danny and Marlo Thomas -- and one startling scene of totally unexpected violence.

The Mad, Mad Mad Comedians was a half-hour collection of animated versions of several living funnyfolks doing their familiar routines.

The Man Who Hated Laughter starred animated versions of several then-popular characters from newspaper comics; all I really recall of it is that Little Iodine sang a song.

Lastly, I think there was a Fat Albert special long before the series; my memory of it is that it had really original art and animation which looked very urban and gritty.
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  #79  
Old 03-31-2017, 06:47 AM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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Originally Posted by DLuxN8R-13 View Post
Lastly, I think there was a Fat Albert special long before the series; my memory of it is that it had really original art and animation which looked very urban and gritty.
This one looks like it really is lost.
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  #80  
Old 03-31-2017, 07:08 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Originally Posted by DLuxN8R-13 View Post
There was Cricket On The Hearth, a pretty lame Christmas cartoon with the voices of Danny and Marlo Thomas -- and one startling scene of totally unexpected violence.

The Mad, Mad Mad Comedians was a half-hour collection of animated versions of several living funnyfolks doing their familiar routines.

.
[I]Cricket on the Hearth was another of Chuck Jones' efforts. I never saw it.

I recall watching The Mad, Mad, Mad Comedians. it was a Rankin-Bass effort, and better than most, although to much of its run time seemed to be the chorus singing "The Mad, Mad, Mad Comedians". The Smothers Brothers were among those used, but the highlight was a Marx Brothers routine that used Groucho's voice, although Paul Frees had to dub in Chico and (according to imdb) Zeppo (nobody, of course had to do Harpo). It was the "Napoleon" sketch from their 1924 comedy "I'll say she is".

it was their highest-rated show ever (according to Wikipedia), and was supposed to be a pilot for a proposed series, but the series never took place. in those post-Flintstone, pre-Simpsons era, prime time animation didn't get off the ground -- all the attempts I recall fizzled.
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  #81  
Old 03-31-2017, 11:09 AM
MrAtoz MrAtoz is offline
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[I]Cricket on the Hearth was another of Chuck Jones' efforts. I never saw it.
Was it? I thought it was Rankin-Bass. Did Jones ever do anything for them? If it is his work, it's certainly not up to his usual standards. It's included on one of my Rankin-Bass holiday DVDs, as a "special feature."

It's a feature, all right, but it ain't that special! In fact, it's dreary and dull, even by Rankin-Bass standards.
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  #82  
Old 03-31-2017, 11:30 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Originally Posted by MrAtoz View Post
Was it? I thought it was Rankin-Bass. Did Jones ever do anything for them? If it is his work, it's certainly not up to his usual standards. It's included on one of my Rankin-Bass holiday DVDs, as a "special feature."

It's a feature, all right, but it ain't that special! In fact, it's dreary and dull, even by Rankin-Bass standards.
Sorry -- I'm thinking of a Cricket in Times Square --

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cr...n_Times_Square

Some of his other work at the time:

Quote:
As the Tom and Jerry series wound down (it was discontinued in 1967), Jones produced more for television. In 1966, he produced and directed the TV special How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, featuring the voice and facial models based on the readings by Boris Karloff.[9]

Jones continued to work on other TV specials such as Horton Hears a Who! (1970), but his main focus during this time was producing the feature film The Phantom Tollbooth, which did lukewarm business when MGM released it in 1970. Jones co-directed 1969's The Pogo Special Birthday Special, based on the Walt Kelly comic strip, and voiced the characters of Porky Pine and Bun Rab. It was at this point that he decided to start ST Incorporated.[7]

MGM closed the animation division in 1970, and Jones once again started his own studio, Chuck Jones Enterprises. He produced a Saturday morning children's TV series for the American Broadcasting Company called The Curiosity Shop in 1971. In 1973, he produced an animated version of the George Selden book The Cricket in Times Square and would go on to produce two sequels.[7]

Three of his works during this period were animated TV adaptations of short stories from Rudyard Kipling's Mowgli's Brothers, The White Seal and Rikki-Tikki-Tavi. During this period, Jones began to experiment with more realistically designed characters, most of which having larger eyes, leaner bodies, and altered proportions, such as those of the Looney Tunes characters.[citation needed]

Jones resumed working with Warner Bros. in 1976 with the animated TV adaptation of The Carnival of the Animals with Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chuck_Jones

Last edited by CalMeacham; 03-31-2017 at 11:32 AM..
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  #83  
Old 03-31-2017, 12:14 PM
Cardigan Cardigan is offline
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I recall seeing an animated Christmas special in the early 1970's that was about all the barnyard animals acquiring the power of speech on Christmas day. I think there was even a song featured called 'It's Great to Communicate"

Saw it one time and never saw or heard of it again.

Last edited by Cardigan; 03-31-2017 at 12:14 PM..
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  #84  
Old 03-31-2017, 12:45 PM
MrAtoz MrAtoz is offline
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Originally Posted by Cardigan View Post
I recall seeing an animated Christmas special in the early 1970's that was about all the barnyard animals acquiring the power of speech on Christmas day. I think there was even a song featured called 'It's Great to Communicate"

Saw it one time and never saw or heard of it again.
I remember that one, too! The Night the Animals Talked. Apparently it was only shown four times.

I had not remembered that it had songs, but it did--written by no less than Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne!
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  #85  
Old 03-31-2017, 02:14 PM
Balance Balance is offline
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Originally Posted by MovieMogul View Post
One of my favorite Xmas special songs was from that show (sung by Joel Grey): "Even a Miracle Needs a Plan"
Even as a small child, I thought that song was the show's only redeeming feature. Everything else about it annoyed me. It's likely that I put a more snarky spin on "You pray, and I'll plan" than was intended, at that. (And it's "Hand", as The Other Waldo Pepper pointed out.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
(As an aside, I've always if "lorax" was supposed to be a pun on "hyrax." Never found an answer, though.)
I've always assumed as much, between the pun and the Lorax's appearance. We're not likely to get it confirmed, unless the good doctor made notes that someone has squirreled away somewhere.
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  #86  
Old 03-31-2017, 04:07 PM
Maus Magill Maus Magill is offline
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Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
If you're looking for lost Pogo animation, there's the 1980 clay animation epic I Go Pogo (AKA Pogo for President) (some places claim 1984, but I read a piece about it in Cinefantastique in 1980). It had rotten distribution (I understand that at one point it was sold through those photo developing booths), and AFAIK has never been on TV or DVD:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_cEzNVuzKg

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0087925/
I have vague memories of seeing I Go Pogo on HBO in the early eighties.
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  #87  
Old 04-01-2017, 03:30 PM
Richard John Marcej Richard John Marcej is offline
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I have vague memories of seeing I Go Pogo on HBO in the early eighties.
I have it on VHS, but since my VCR's no longer work, it's nothing more than a door stop. Unless I can find it on DVD or get it transferred, it'll be lost for me
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  #88  
Old 04-01-2017, 04:19 PM
WildBlueYonder WildBlueYonder is offline
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When I was a youngster (many, many years ago), they used to show a full-length cartoon of "A Christmas Carol" starring the nearsighted Mr. Magoo. It pretty much disappeared from the airways (probably because it was in black and white, IIRC) and I haven't seen it in a long time, but for me and probably many kids in the 50's and 60's it was our introduction to Dicken's classic.
I loved Mr Magoo in whatever....

Quote:
Originally Posted by DLuxN8R-13 View Post
There was Cricket On The Hearth, a pretty lame Christmas cartoon with the voices of Danny and Marlo Thomas -- and one startling scene of totally unexpected violence.
Loved the show but I had no idea it was Danny and Marlo

Wasnt there something called "The mouse and the Mayflower" or was it on the Mayflower?


I dont remember a "Puff the Magic Dragon" show, as an adult I've listened a bit better to the lyrics, poor Puff.Sad song. Dont really want to listen to it anymore. I used to have a yellow 78 record of it...I've tried to save it over the years but it seems to have disappeared. Maybe it got into one of the other jackets of albums I still have. I played that record to death!

Last edited by WildBlueYonder; 04-01-2017 at 04:24 PM..
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