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  #51  
Old 10-11-2012, 05:45 PM
skdo23 skdo23 is offline
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Let me guess, you also dazzle your co-workers by your frequent use of words like "win-win," "paradigm," and "dynamic," and when you interviewed for your current job you told the interviewer that your greatest weakness is that you work too hard.
  #52  
Old 10-11-2012, 05:48 PM
mbh mbh is offline
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Originally Posted by flano1 View Post
Blame the Baby Boomers!

No more Sunday-Going-To-Meeting-Clothes for us!
This, but I think for slightly different reasons.

Up until World War II, the vast majority of the population did hard physical labor. They spend most of their week wearing khakis or dungarees. For social occasions, they dressed up. The suit and tie was a welcome escape from the weekday routine.

In the 1950s and 1960s, many people moved up to the middle class, into white-collar jobs, where the suit and tie were part of the weekday routine. So casual clothes became the escape from workday drudgery.
  #53  
Old 10-11-2012, 05:49 PM
Mewl Dear Mewl Dear is offline
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I seem to be the opposite of the OP.
I went to my grandmas funeral a couple of months ago.
Most of the older men wore suits, none of the grand kids did. I haven't owned a suit in decades so wore nice jeans and a button down and decent shoes, no one seemed to mind. My 70 something uncle wore jeans and a pink tee advertising his business.
OP, do you wear a bowler hat to baseball games?
It was the style back in the day.
I don't even own a suit, you can call home and ask my wife.
  #54  
Old 10-11-2012, 05:54 PM
Lemur866 Lemur866 is offline
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Originally Posted by GQELITE33 View Post
I think this all comes down to a pychological standpoint.

If I feel more confident wearing a suit , then I will wear a suit.

If you want to wear jeans and gym shoes, and feel more confident doing that, be my guest.
Yes, this is true. I would NOT feel more confident wearing a suit, I'd feel as nervous as if I was dressed in a Roman toga. There are times where it would be appropriate to wear a Roman toga, and when those times come up I will wear a Roman toga no matter how uncomfortable I am wearing it. But for sitting at my desk working?

I work in technology in Seattle. If you wore slacks and a buttoned shirt every day to work people would think you like to dress up, but that would be your style. If you wore a suit and tie to work every day people would think you were crazy. There are client-facing parts of the industry where people dress according to the expectations of the clients, so if you are in the legal department you wear a suit and tie. But if you're sweating in the server room you could wear a t-shirt and jeans, or shorts and sandals, or dockers and a buttoned up shirt according to your taste.

People don't wear suits because they'd stand out as the weird one. If you're wearing a suit and tie because you've got your eye on a different job, a job where wearing a suit and tie is the uniform, then why don't you get that job? You wearing a suit means you don't fit in, and don't want to fit in. That's fine, but what are you doing here?
  #55  
Old 10-11-2012, 06:07 PM
RaftPeople RaftPeople is offline
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Originally Posted by Great Antibob View Post
Ok, so that works for you.

Why should that mean it works for everybody else?

Rather than the question you originally asked, you are explicitly stating, "Why don't other people share MY values and what's wrong with THEM?", which is an entirely different kettle of fish.
I love these threads on the SDMB. Other entertaining ones:
1 - Why do you like tattoos (as in you shouldn't)
2 - Why do you like parties (as in your shouldn't)
3 - Why so you like sports (as in you shouldn't)
4 - table manners
5 - car you drive
6 - etc.


I just don't understand how anyone can like the color blue. It makes no sense. Red is so much more colorful, it has heart and warmth, blue is like a frozen landscape buried in the depths of time after nuclear holocaust.

Everyone should like red just like I do.
  #56  
Old 10-11-2012, 06:11 PM
RaftPeople RaftPeople is offline
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Originally Posted by Lemur866 View Post
I work in technology in Seattle.
I work in seattle and I wear lederhosen every day.

Once, at a meeting, I was wearing my favorite lederhosen and the CEO was just wearing a suit, our customers arrived and they all thought I was CEO.

They said "How can you NOT be the CEO? You are wearing lederhosen! You must be the CEO! You are the only person we will deal with at this company!"
  #57  
Old 10-11-2012, 06:14 PM
Blakeyrat Blakeyrat is offline
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Originally Posted by RaftPeople View Post
I work in seattle and I wear lederhosen every day.
You joke, but utilikilts are considered acceptable standard office wear in Seattle.
  #58  
Old 10-11-2012, 06:45 PM
gazpacho gazpacho is offline
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You joke, but utilikilts are considered acceptable standard office wear in Seattle.
My wife wants me to get a utilikilt. She says I have the legs for it. But I am not willing to spend $200 on a joke that I know I will not wear. On the other hand I let her buy me a fair number of suits for a lot more than that. Which I only wear to funerals and fancy dinners.
  #59  
Old 10-11-2012, 07:05 PM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
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The main factors in why people dress down much more today compared to previous generations?
we finally figured out that dressing expensively doesn't say anything about how competent or how good a person the wearer is. For example:

Quote:
In my profession, I want people to know I am the boss. I am the leader of the pack. I want them to say "There is the Alpha Male!"
to me, that says you are either extremely arrogant or extremely insecure.

Quote:
I have always taken pride in my clothing and having it pressed and dry cleaned and making sure it looks great. I shine my shoes a couple times a week.I make sure I groom myself at an exceptional level and smell nice. It makes me feel good and gives me confidence in myself. If I look in the mirror and look like I should be giving a speech in front of thousands, I will feel like a bad ass. I will feel power. Thats the way I look at it. Its all psychological.
You are not your clothes. I'm sure the people behind Enron, Adelphia, MCI Worldcom, and Cerberus all dressed very smartly too.

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If I go out and spend money on nice clothes, I am gonna wear them. Get my moneys worth out of them. Then I will go out and buy some new clothes that are nice, and wear those as much as I can.

If I invest money into something, I don't want it sitting in a closet for months on end. I will make sure to wear them when I can. If I go to a steakhouse where the waiters are in tuxes, that tells me that wearing a suit is more than acceptable. Why would you own dress clothes and not wear them? When you invest money into something, get your moneys worth out of them. Thats they way I look at it. Find places where you can go to do this.

Thats why when I go out , I go to nice places. Cause I invest money into slacks, dress shirts, and suits.
So basically, you live to be a peacock. I doubt you're impressing anyone, least of all me.

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Why in the world do people find that dressing up is hard work? If looking sharp is hard work or uncomfortable, then that is really bazarre to me.. Just my two cents.
here's why- formal wear (either business or black-tie) requires well-fitted clothing. Which for most of us means "tailored." I'm proportioned such that I've found it damn near impossible to get a dress shirt off-the-shelf which simultaneously fits my neck, shoulders, chest, and waist. So now I'd have to pay a tailor to fit shirts to me.

and the final reason? It's not expected in my profession. I'm an engineer, anything better than jeans & a tee is de rigueur. If I showed up in a suit and tie, nobody would say "well, there's a go-getter who is moving up fast!" They'd wonder "why is he wearing a suit? Must have an interview."
  #60  
Old 10-11-2012, 07:18 PM
Llama Llogophile Llama Llogophile is online now
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I hate dressing up largely because I've always felt neckties are stupid and pointless unless you use them as napkins. If the trend is toward more casual wear and this causes the tie to go the way of the dodo, I'm all for it.
  #61  
Old 10-11-2012, 07:48 PM
skdo23 skdo23 is offline
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Originally Posted by GQELITE33 View Post
Want to be taken seriously? Dress the part!
....and try to avoid actually using the word "Amway."
  #62  
Old 10-11-2012, 07:48 PM
ZenBeam ZenBeam is offline
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Originally Posted by RaftPeople View Post
I just don't understand how anyone can like the color blue. It makes no sense. Red is so much more colorful, it has heart and warmth, blue is like a frozen landscape buried in the depths of time after nuclear holocaust.

Everyone should like red just like I do.
I think you meant to put this part in a new thread.





(Cause that would be awesome.)
  #63  
Old 10-11-2012, 08:14 PM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is offline
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Related thread, only with fewer responses.
  #64  
Old 10-11-2012, 08:33 PM
suranyi suranyi is offline
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Originally Posted by Blakeyrat View Post
I work in IT in Seattle. This isn't true in any company I've worked at. In fact, in my first professional position, I usually out-dressed the CEO. (And I was just wearing normal business casual attire.) The boss I most respect wore blue jeans and torn concert t-shirts from 15 years ago, every day.

It's not the 60s anymore.
That's true. I work in the Bay Area, but our division is based in Orange County, and the company headquarters is in Maryland. Here we're all very casual, and that's true down south as well, but back east there are a lot of people in suits in upper management.

So it depends on the company and the local environment.
  #65  
Old 10-11-2012, 08:38 PM
suranyi suranyi is offline
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Originally Posted by Blakeyrat View Post
To give the cliched and expected answer, if she's that shallow I don't want to meet her.

But more seriously, despite my looking like a slob (by your definition), I've never had any problems in that department. Maybe you're hanging out at the wrong bars.



You haven't yet demonstrated that your point-of-view is the majority view, or even a common view.
Actually, as it turns out, the first time my wife saw me I was wearing a suit. It just happened to be a formal occasion. I don't normally wear a suit very often.

However, she thought I looked good in the suit, and that was one thing that drew her to me.
  #66  
Old 10-11-2012, 08:44 PM
sunstone sunstone is offline
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When I go to a wedding or funeral, I dress to show respect.

But as a person who has been the boss almost all of my professional life, I did not rely on clothing to make a statement. If my associates and "underlings" didn't know I was the boss regardless of my clothing, I certainly was doing something wrong.

I wore business casual, and never had anyone treat me with anything other than respect. Being inherently competent, confident, and assured can be deeper than clothes.

Now I am retired, and never go to the Captain's Table on cruises. And I live where a tie and sports coat is acceptable anywhere. Ahhh, comfort.
  #67  
Old 10-11-2012, 08:53 PM
Lasciel Lasciel is offline
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I actively dislike most suits.

If a man in a suit really actually does look GQ, then that's attractive. I'm not trying to be harsh here, but the chances of the OP actually looking like he stepped out of the pages of GQ (regardless of his clothing and grooming choices) are slim to none. Those photo-shoots are carefully calibrated, tricked-out, bedecked, and then photoshopped to make those suits and those particular models look good.

99% of the population will not look as good in a suit as those pictures would like you to think. (Likewise for women's clothing, so don't think I'm knocking suits overly harshly.)

In the meantime, to the OP; I think that you perhaps think a great deal about your appearance, and that's not a bad thing, but lots of other people really couldn't give two shits, other than making sure that we're clean, groomed, decent, and wearing clothing that matches the dominant trends in our work/social environment. You know what? That's totally ok! Think of it this way - it makes you peacocks stand out more, so you can feel superior to all of us "slobs."

BTW - I don't take showers in the morning, nor do I drink juice, coffee, or eat breakfast. I must be racking up some great cosmic negative karma there, huh?
  #68  
Old 10-11-2012, 09:12 PM
RaftPeople RaftPeople is offline
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Originally Posted by Blakeyrat View Post
You joke, but utilikilts are considered acceptable standard office wear in Seattle.
I have seen a person or two wearing one of those.
  #69  
Old 10-11-2012, 09:35 PM
JRDelirious JRDelirious is offline
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Y'know, the invisible hand of the marketplace is a wonderful thing. Many restaursants and nightclubs noticed that requiring jackets and ties meant they were turning away people whose money was as green as anyone else's so they adjusted. And not dressing up to business does not mean not dressing nicely. There's a way to go between ditching the grey-flannel-suit uniform and looking like a fool with your pants on the ground. Now I can arrive at the club in a sharp-pressed shirt, fine well-fitted pants, vintage jacket and Allen Edmonds loafers, and they'll show me in just as happily as when I'm in my suit and tie. Options.

People did use show up in suit and tie even to baseball games and ride the train to and from menial jobs, as late as the mid-20th century, it's true. But in the past, a regular Joe's going-out wardrobe would be centered on one good suit(or dress) or two that could take a whole lot of wear if you took good care. Moneyed people OTOH would have specific suits and dresses for specific parts of the day and specific events. It's another artifact of post-WW2 prosperity to have middle-class people own a lot of clothes that they wear for one or two seasons and then get rid of or wear out.
  #70  
Old 10-11-2012, 10:02 PM
Ulfreida Ulfreida is offline
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The Why happened in the sixties. When I was a child, there was a dress code for school -- for example girls wore dresses that came to the middle of the knee, no more no less, and I also remember stiff crinkly slips that made one's skirt stand out, that was standard until about 1962 or so. They were very unpleasant. I remember when I was in fifth grade a teacher was sent home by the principal because her skirt was too short. That was 1966.

In the late sixties/early seventies there was, you may have heard, an enormous revolution in dress, via young people. Young women defiantly began wearing pants, miniskirts, long skirts that swept the floor; young men wore their hair long, wore flowered indian print shirts, bell bottomed jeans, all very suddenly . . .

The "fifties" were a real historical anomaly in the extreme conformity that was imposed. I didn't realize this until recently. The pent-up creativity and rebelliousness was kind of an explosion -- I remember in 7th grade going to a Donovan concert at the Oakland Coliseum and being amazed at all the young women dressed apparently in nightgowns. At that stage I was being daring wearing blue jeans.

Really, that was the beginning and it never went away, it just got more so. On the west coast particularly, the dress code just melted away, first for creative types of professions, but eventually just about everyone was included. Women, who always must tread a difficult line professionally in their dress, I think experience things rather differently than men. Many professions demand that women look "pulled together" in a way not required of men.

There are all sorts of practical reasons and cultural reasons, but personally I find it kind of sad that it has increased to the degree that there is hardly any way to mark a different level of formality or specialness any more. I dress up for church and to go out to dinner at a nice restaurant and stuff, but I know that I am going to be one of the few people who does so, it's like writing with a fountain pen, just an idiosyncratic holdover from the past.
  #71  
Old 10-12-2012, 12:05 AM
GreenElf GreenElf is offline
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I have to think this comes from late-90s tech culture, when computer skills became a lot more important all of the sudden, and a generation of college graduates rose rapidly through the ranks without being indoctrinated into "business culture" first.
I thought it was late 70s -early 80s tech culture, especially Gates and Jobs, that ushered in casual attire at work.
  #72  
Old 10-12-2012, 12:11 AM
Clothahump Clothahump is offline
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I'll wear a suit for a job interview. I will occasionally wear my Taekwondo dress blue suit. I'll wear a suit if SWMBO threatens to dismember me if I don't.

Other than that, it's business casual for me, baby!
  #73  
Old 10-12-2012, 12:22 AM
Ravenman Ravenman is offline
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Originally Posted by GQELITE33 View Post
Only in todays society can you show up to dinner at a five star steakhouse and have someone be surprised to see someone dressed up in a suit.
May I ask, did you recently have an experience like this? Because you seem a little annoyed by people not dressing as nicely as tradition may recommend. Does it bother or annoy you when people don't wear a suit to a nice restaurant or a play?
  #74  
Old 10-12-2012, 12:26 AM
Frisco Frisco is offline
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What happened? The 60s happened. (Stands in front yard shaking fist at those damned, dirty hippies.).

I think it's hilarious that so many people who express disdain for a nice suit under the guise of some naive rebellion spirit don't even recognize they haven't given up wearing a uniform -- they've just rationalized wearing a tackier uniform.
  #75  
Old 10-12-2012, 12:28 AM
Son of a Rich Son of a Rich is offline
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You know who was a sharp dresser? Hitler.
  #76  
Old 10-12-2012, 12:49 AM
alphaboi867 alphaboi867 is offline
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Originally Posted by GQELITE33 View Post
When they are campaigning in blue collar communities. In the White House they will always be dressed in a suit.
Even state dinners aren't as formal as they used to be. A generation ago there were always white tie. Now they're black tie. Of all the state dinners hosted in the 8 yrs of the Bush presidency only one was white tie; the one given for Queen Elizabeth II. And even Bush wanted it to be black tie, but he was overuled by Mrs Bush.

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Originally Posted by Ulfreida View Post
...I remember when I was in fifth grade a teacher was sent home by the principal because her skirt was too short. That was 1966...
The girls PE teacher at my HS once mentioned that when she started teaching back in the '70s she wasn't allowed to set foot outside the gym unless she changed into a dress & stockings first.
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  #77  
Old 10-12-2012, 02:31 AM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Originally Posted by suranyi View Post
That's true, but the the guy in the suit is the guy who tells the guy like you what stuff to get done.
Nope the CEO of my old company was famous for not wearing suits (except when meeting with world leaders) and saying that ties were only good for keeping soup off your buttons. The suits took orders from him. He's a billionaire, btw. Nobody in my management chain from me to him wore suits.
  #78  
Old 10-12-2012, 02:40 AM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Dressing up takes time, effort and money invested into a persons image. The more they do that, the more they make a statement that they care about themselves. A person who wants to be perceived as a leader and set an example, dresses up. People that are comfortable just being one of the sheep, dresses down. Bill Gates was never the type of guy that would ever dress up. He was a hippie nerd savant who had high intelligence and even though he is very smart he is very ignorant when it comes to style sense.
Just because it is GQ and all, Gates was never a hippie. Gates went to Harvard. I lived in Cambridge at that time - there were hippie types hanging out in Harvard Square, but not in Harvard or MIT.
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In my profession, I want people to know I am the boss. I am the leader of the pack. I want them to say "There is the Alpha Male!"
In my profession clout comes from skill and knowledge. A suit wearing guy without these gets laughed at behind his back - or in front. Note that the PHB in Dilbert wears a suit - thus are suits considered in the tech industry.
  #79  
Old 10-12-2012, 02:59 AM
Spectre of Pithecanthropus Spectre of Pithecanthropus is offline
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I think one big reason is that interiors are kept warmer than they were in the old days. Maybe it's age creeping up on me, but I can't remember the last time I was anywhere indoors and could wear a jacket and tie without feeling uncomfortably warm. I like to wear a sharp suit now and then but what good is it if you can't keep the jacket on? Without the jacket the suit loses all its visual power and you look like a 1950s-era hardware store clerk.


For men, practical considerations may also play a role. When I wear jeans I know I'm not going to lose things out of my pockets when I sit down, particularly in a car. I can carry my wallet in a back pocket without worrying about said pocket wearing out and a tiny hole appearing at its edge over time. I've had that happen with slacks. Also, with jeans anything you put in the front pockets pretty much stays put, but in slacks it jingles and rattles, at least in my case. It's annoying.
  #80  
Old 10-12-2012, 03:30 AM
Spoons Spoons is online now
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As a lawyer, I must show up in court wearing a suit, tie, and dress shoes. The Court expects that I will be suitably attired to speak before it. It can order me home to change; and if I do not obey or if I protest, I can be held in contempt of court.

As a lawyer, I must attend upon my clients in the local jail wearing, at the very least, a sports jacket, tie, and slacks. My inmate clients expect their lawyer to look like a lawyer.

As a private citizen, I'm torn. Perhaps because I have to wear them so often, I don't like suits, jackets, and ties; but I will grant they have their place in the private sphere: weddings and funerals, for example. Still, if I could get away without them, I would; but at my age, not wearing a suit and tie at a funeral might be seen as disrespectful to the deceased. In fact, I was surprised to find, at the recent funeral of a relative, that my nephews not only refused to wear anything other than golf shirts and khakis, but that neither owned a suit, a jacket, or a tie. "They refuse to wear anything like that," their mother (my sister) said. I find this hard to believe, as I was forced into jackets and ties from a young age (weekly church, family gatherings, dinners at Grandma's, etc.), and I'm surprised that my sister wouldn't follow our mother's lead and force her kids into at least owning a jacket and tie for such occasions. I had to have such clothing and was not allowed to refuse to wear it on those occasions, but I guess my sister has other ideas. Times and generations change, I suppose.

I do like dressing up from time to time, and when my ex-wife and I went out for a fancy dinner, or to a company Christmas party, or similar; I always wore a jacket and tie. After all, she always wore a pretty outfit, and I wanted to look like I belonged with her. Besides, I have some nice ties that go well with my shirts and sport jackets--why not show them off?
  #81  
Old 10-12-2012, 08:38 AM
JKellyMap JKellyMap is offline
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Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
My guess is role models. When I was a kid any adult you saw higher than waiter or ditch digger was in a suit...
The "waiter" part of this is now ironic, given that very often these days the waiters are the most sharply dressed people in a typical restaurant.
  #82  
Old 10-12-2012, 09:38 AM
BubbaDog BubbaDog is offline
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Originally Posted by GQELITE33 View Post
Dressing up takes time, effort and money invested into a persons image. The more they do that, the more they make a statement that they care about themselves.
I missed that somehow. All I get out of seeing somebody dressed up is a sense of sadness that they would probably be more comfortable in casual clothes.

Quote:
A person who wants to be perceived as a leader and set an example, dresses up.
And a true leader leads. A leader doesn't have to wear a leader uniform to prove he is the leader.
Quote:
People that are comfortable just being one of the sheep, dresses down. Bill Gates was never the type of guy that would ever dress up. He was a hippie nerd savant who had high intelligence and even though he is very smart he is very ignorant when it comes to style sense.
You statement disproves itself. Proves the statement I made above. A true leader simply leads. Put a buffoon in a suit and it try to call it a leader and you get the pointy haired guy in the Dilbert comic strip.

Quote:
In my profession, I want people to know I am the boss. I am the leader of the pack. I want them to say "There is the Alpha Male!"
My guess is that your "team" follows you because you lead and not due to your spiffy appearance.

Quote:
I have always taken pride in my clothing and having it pressed and dry cleaned and making sure it looks great. I shine my shoes a couple times a week.I make sure I groom myself at an exceptional level and smell nice. It makes me feel good and gives me confidence in myself. If I look in the mirror and look like I should be giving a speech in front of thousands, I will feel like a bad ass. I will feel power. Thats the way I look at it. Its all psychological.
Your only point that I agree with. Clothes help you be want you want to be. If nice clothes give you a mental boost then go with it. In my case and the case of others we neither lead nor follow based on appearance.

I'm an owner of the company I work in. I am sitting at my desk now in my cargo shorts and T-shirt. I wrote the dress code that I will share with you in it's entirety. My apologies if it is too verbose -

Don't come to work stinky!

Everyone here strictly follows that code.

Last edited by BubbaDog; 10-12-2012 at 09:38 AM.
  #83  
Old 10-12-2012, 09:41 AM
GQELITE33 GQELITE33 is offline
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Originally Posted by Lasciel View Post
I actively dislike most suits.

If a man in a suit really actually does look GQ, then that's attractive. I'm not trying to be harsh here, but the chances of the OP actually looking like he stepped out of the pages of GQ (regardless of his clothing and grooming choices) are slim to none. Those photo-shoots are carefully calibrated, tricked-out, bedecked, and then photoshopped to make those suits and those particular models look good.

99% of the population will not look as good in a suit as those pictures would like you to think. (Likewise for women's clothing, so don't think I'm knocking suits overly harshly.)

In the meantime, to the OP; I think that you perhaps think a great deal about your appearance, and that's not a bad thing, but lots of other people really couldn't give two shits, other than making sure that we're clean, groomed, decent, and wearing clothing that matches the dominant trends in our work/social environment. You know what? That's totally ok! Think of it this way - it makes you peacocks stand out more, so you can feel superior to all of us "slobs."

BTW - I don't take showers in the morning, nor do I drink juice, coffee, or eat breakfast. I must be racking up some great cosmic negative karma there, huh?
A man will look good in a suit if he goes and gets it Tailored properly to fit his body type. Also when you go to a place that does this, they will work with you to find the best color combinations and suit that fits you the best. I know this for a fact! Don't buy suits off the shelf! You gotta get them tailored.

Also you do not have to wear a suit everyday to look good. I was thinking about this thread this morning and I came off the wrong way. In no way was I saying you have to wear a suit every single day to look nice. Today I am not wearing a suit. I am wearing a nice dress shirt and a pair of nice slacks with dress shoes. No tie btw.

Last edited by GQELITE33; 10-12-2012 at 09:44 AM.
  #84  
Old 10-12-2012, 09:59 AM
ralph124c ralph124c is offline
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There is another reason why men don't wear jackets/suits in the office anymore-offices are well heated these days. Back in the old (pre-1950's days), offices were poorly heated-you needed to wear a jacket to keep warm.
In places that still lack central heating, you still see guys wearing jackets.
  #85  
Old 10-12-2012, 10:09 AM
Anaamika Anaamika is offline
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As a woman, I just want to interject to say, while I love a suit-wearin' man, provided he looks good in it and it's fitted, I love blue jeans too. It's all about how you rock it (and hygiene) of course.
  #86  
Old 10-12-2012, 10:35 AM
Great Antibob Great Antibob is offline
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So, we're coming off a historic recession (which we still haven't recovered from), families on two incomes are making comparatively less than single income households from the 70s, there's still high unemployment, and people need to spend more money to get (1) "decent" clothes which have been (2) tailored?

If it wasn't obvious before, it's certainly obvious now that reality and this thread parted ways long ago.
  #87  
Old 10-12-2012, 10:35 AM
Telemark Telemark is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GQELITE33 View Post
A man will look good in a suit if he goes and gets it Tailored properly to fit his body type. Also when you go to a place that does this, they will work with you to find the best color combinations and suit that fits you the best. I know this for a fact! Don't buy suits off the shelf! You gotta get them tailored.
You still haven't addressed the point that most folks don't need a suit to look good or to dress well for the events in their lives. Dressing in a nice suit is fine, but unless you want to look like a person in a suit it's not appropriate.

Back at a previous job we had an engineer (a good one, too) who decided he was going to dress up for work to gain an edge and aim for a higher job. He looked like a fool wearing a suit in our office, and he definitely lost points on the respect scale because it was so transparent. He looked good; the suits were nice and well fitted. But the effect was so jarring as to destroy his credibility in the software development environment. He eventually dropped the idea and went back to jeans and his career continued its upward track.
  #88  
Old 10-12-2012, 10:35 AM
GQELITE33 GQELITE33 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaamika View Post
As a woman, I just want to interject to say, while I love a suit-wearin' man, provided he looks good in it and it's fitted, I love blue jeans too. It's all about how you rock it (and hygiene) of course.
Well said on that one.
  #89  
Old 10-12-2012, 10:42 AM
GQELITE33 GQELITE33 is offline
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How about you keep it simple.

Follow your companies dress code. Simple as that.

If you go to a five star restaurant, dress like you are at a five star restaurant.

Dress the Part. The end.

But it doesn't hurt to have your own style, if its positive and you look good doing it.

Last edited by GQELITE33; 10-12-2012 at 10:43 AM.
  #90  
Old 10-12-2012, 10:45 AM
Malden Capell Malden Capell is offline
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Isn't it also that back in the day, people bathed/showered less frequently and so they put on elaborate clothing and many layers (such as kummerbunds, waistcoats and cravats) as a means of suppressing bodily odour?
  #91  
Old 10-12-2012, 10:59 AM
BMalion BMalion is offline
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On a personal note, I used to love wearing a suit. I was a chef in the old days and suits were exciting and fun. I still own six (6!) tuxedos and 2 kilt outfits, one casual and one formal, plus a utilikilt. I can tie every tie knot known to man. Plus I have a formal Japanese outfit. I own about a dozen hats and two opera capes. Several 3-piece suits and two antique pocket watches.

Sadly, I am now in a wheelchair and have trouble with buttons and zippers, let alone a tie. So I wear sweatsuits 24/7 (except the shower).

Some of my friends dress like hobos, and some like federal judges.

Having lived both sides of the coin, I see everyone is different. Do what feels right but don't look down on others.
  #92  
Old 10-12-2012, 11:13 AM
Coustralee Coustralee is offline
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this thread reminds me of an ad where an actor would imply that you're not a real man if you're not taking care of your skin - by using moisturiser.
  #93  
Old 10-12-2012, 11:15 AM
msmith537 msmith537 is offline
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I think it depends on location, industry and other factors. I work a block from Wall Street and there are plenty of people in suits. Lawyers always seem to wear suits. I always wear suits to client meetings, as do my peers.

Although more often than not, I see people wearing what I call "Deloitte casual friday". Black dress pants and a blue or white dress shirt from Brooks Brothers or Thomas Pink or wherever. Which is still pretty casual when compared to Wall Street of old.
  #94  
Old 10-12-2012, 11:26 AM
GQELITE33 GQELITE33 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msmith537 View Post
I think it depends on location, industry and other factors. I work a block from Wall Street and there are plenty of people in suits. Lawyers always seem to wear suits. I always wear suits to client meetings, as do my peers.

Although more often than not, I see people wearing what I call "Deloitte casual friday". Black dress pants and a blue or white dress shirt from Brooks Brothers or Thomas Pink or wherever. Which is still pretty casual when compared to Wall Street of old.
Well said as well.
  #95  
Old 10-12-2012, 11:32 AM
Exapno Mapcase Exapno Mapcase is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GQELITE33 View Post
How about you keep it simple.

Follow your companies dress code. Simple as that.
I don't work for a company. And the word is company's. A possessive, not a plural. I judge people by their use of language a million times more than I do their dress. You apparently don't. Why is that? Language, unlike dress, is actually important.

Quote:
If you go to a five star restaurant, dress like you are at a five star restaurant.
Fine. I'll never go to a five-star restaurant, which means I'm safe.

Quote:
Dress the Part. The end.
I'm dressing my Part. The end.
  #96  
Old 10-12-2012, 11:33 AM
GQELITE33 GQELITE33 is offline
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Five reasons why young men should dress sharp

Reason #1: Dressing sharp draws positive attention

From http://www.realmenrealstyle.com/5-re...d-dress-sharp/

MODERATOR NOTE..........................................

GQELITE33. You can't just quote a hugh block of text from another website. I deleted most and put in your source.

samclem, moderator

Last edited by samclem; 10-12-2012 at 01:16 PM. Reason: Copyright infringment.
  #97  
Old 10-12-2012, 11:34 AM
Kiyoshi Kiyoshi is offline
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I wonder whether, back in 1812, GQELITE33's great-great-great-great-great-great-grandfather was saying: -

Only in to-day's Society can one show up to Dinner, and have Some-one be surprised to see him dressed in Knee-Breeches and Stockings! Indeed, the only time one finds it normal to see Some-one in a Gold-embroidered Tail-Coat is at a Wedding! When did Dressing-Up become such a Chore? A Man should feel good about putting on a powdered Wig and looking quite the Dandy.

Fashion changes. The suit has been with us for a very long time, and (I hope) is now on its way out.

Also, not everyone thinks of a suit as "sharp". Personally, I find that a suit makes a man look stiff, dull, unattractive, and a lot older than he really is.

Last edited by Kiyoshi; 10-12-2012 at 11:36 AM.
  #98  
Old 10-12-2012, 11:40 AM
GQELITE33 GQELITE33 is offline
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What Does Dressing Sharp Mean?

Before we get to the reasons why young men should dress sharp, I believe that we should examine what “dressing sharp” means. Below are four definitions of the sharp-dressed young man.

1. Dressing sharp means to wear clean clothes that fit


MODERATOR NOTE #2.

See my note in the previous post.

samclem, moderator

Last edited by samclem; 10-12-2012 at 01:19 PM. Reason: removed copyright infringement
  #99  
Old 10-12-2012, 11:43 AM
GQELITE33 GQELITE33 is offline
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A stylish well fitted suit will never go out of style. The only thing that goes out of style with suits is the color patterns.

P.S. The double breasted suit is not in style right now btw.

Last edited by GQELITE33; 10-12-2012 at 11:43 AM.
  #100  
Old 10-12-2012, 11:44 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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I own my own business, a sole proprietorship. There are few perks to my situation, but one is that I can wear whatever the fuck I want. And I do.
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