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  #201  
Old 09-17-2017, 10:30 PM
River Hippie River Hippie is offline
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I always notice when a British person tacks on the unnecessary (to my reasoning) time.

AE: "I'll be there in ten minutes."

BE: "I'll be there in ten minutes time."
  #202  
Old 09-17-2017, 10:31 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
To this American, "geezer" definitely implies advanced age, but does not imply anything at all about frailty. You can have a tottering old geezer or a tough old geezer. And in the case of "tough old geezer", there's definitely an undertone of respect.
To me, in US English, "geezer" connotes a grumpy old man.
  #203  
Old 09-18-2017, 12:02 AM
cochrane cochrane is online now
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Originally Posted by Rick Kitchen View Post
American waitresses of a certain age will call their customers "honey" or "sweetie".
Or "Shug." (Short for "Sugar."
  #204  
Old 09-19-2017, 07:42 AM
Green Bean Green Bean is offline
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Various ways to resurrect a "plural you":

You-uns [yunz or yinz], as already noted in Pittsburg area.

Yous or Yous guys; New Joisey

Y'all --> All y'all; various parts of the south

No, normal people don't say "youse guys" in New Jersey. Nor do we say "bada bing bada boom." Or "Joisey," for that matter.

I've only ever heard youse guys used once, by a school lunch lady on Long Island* in 1978 or so. I remember it because I went home and asked my mommy what she was on about.** Never heard it in "in the wild" again.

"Y'all" is common, even outside the South. "Yinz" was definitely in use in Pittsburgh, at least amongst working-class folks in the early '90s when I lived there - though I think it was typically avoided because "Yinzer" had become a negative stereotype.

* Long Island is indeed pronounced Lawn Guyland by natives, though not in such an exaggerated way.
** Deliberate use of a British-ism there. We would say "what she was talking about" instead.

Last edited by Green Bean; 09-19-2017 at 07:44 AM.
  #205  
Old 09-19-2017, 08:07 AM
Aspidistra Aspidistra is offline
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Originally Posted by Green Bean View Post
No, normal people don't say "youse guys" in New Jersey.
You have to come to Australia for that one...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Green Bean View Post
Nor do we say "bada bing bada boom." Or "Joisey," for that matter.
...but there, I got nothin'
  #206  
Old 09-19-2017, 08:12 AM
Ludovic Ludovic is offline
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Perhaps not *subtle* but while evacuating from Irma I listened to the Beeb overnight on my 22(!) hour drive from Melbourne to Louisville and some - but not all - announcers pronounced the name of the next hurricane as "Joe-zay". Which made me cringe but then I realized that the American pronunciation of "Hoe-zay" probably makes Spanish speakers cringe equally.
  #207  
Old 09-19-2017, 08:53 AM
LSLGuy LSLGuy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Green Bean View Post
No, normal people don't say ... Or "Joisey," for that matter.

I've only ever heard youse guys used once, by a school lunch lady on Long Island* ...

* Long Island is indeed pronounced Lawn Guyland by natives, though not in such an exaggerated way.
...
And many New Jerseyians totally do say "Joisey", though not in such an exaggerated way.

Or at least that's what it sounds like to most people from elsewhere.

Last edited by LSLGuy; 09-19-2017 at 08:53 AM.
  #208  
Old 09-19-2017, 11:13 AM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Back in college, I had a roommate from New Jersey, and in most regards, his accent was basically just the Wonder Bread newscaster accent that you could hear anywhere in America... except that he called the compartment you pull out in a dresser a "draw", instead of a "drawer". I'm not sure if he thought it was spelled "draw", or knew the spelling and was just eliding the final R.
  #209  
Old 09-19-2017, 12:35 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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"Youse" and "youse guys" is definitely used among some (sub)dialects in Chicago. I will occasionally use it in the phrase "Hey, whatchoose guys up to?" "Youse" is far more common. I could swear I've heard it in the New York metro area, but there's just so many accents out there.

Last edited by pulykamell; 09-19-2017 at 12:37 PM.
  #210  
Old 09-19-2017, 02:21 PM
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is offline
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Quote:
"Y'all" is common, even outside the South. "Yinz" was definitely in use in Pittsburgh, at least amongst working-class folks in the early '90s when I lived there - though I think it was typically avoided because "Yinzer" had become a negative stereotype.
I had a roommate in the Air Force from Youngstown, Ohio who sayd "yunz".

When I was going to college, there was a guy in one of my classes from Southern Georgia, who spoke with what would almost have qualified as a New Jersey/Brooklyn accent, with the "joisey" pronunciation.
  #211  
Old 09-19-2017, 04:50 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by River Hippie View Post
I always notice when a British person tacks on the unnecessary (to my reasoning) time.

AE: "I'll be there in ten minutes."

BE: "I'll be there in ten minutes time."
But does it then become "ten minutes' time"?
  #212  
Old 09-20-2017, 03:47 AM
MrDibble MrDibble is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
except that he called the compartment you pull out in a dresser a "draw", instead of a "drawer".
Oh, that's how we say it here as well - so it's a "chest of draws" - even though you'll write "chest of drawers"
  #213  
Old 10-30-2017, 07:28 PM
Melbourne Melbourne is offline
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Can the Rightponders clarify a usage I often hear on British television: the singular were. An example might be someone saying of a third person "He weren't a bad bloke."

Is this a subjunctive nicety I should know, or merely a characteristic usage of a particular class or locale?
The subjunctive mode is common -- you must remember (1) that in England, politeness is often a form of rudeness, and (2) openness is an American characteristic. A British TV character wouldn't call his friends "nice" or "good" unless he was taking the piss or was unsufferably worthy.

On the other hand the subjective tense is local dialect. An Australian would say "he wasn't a bad bloke" or "He's not a bad bloke".
  #214  
Old 10-31-2017, 08:32 AM
Malleus, Incus, Stapes! Malleus, Incus, Stapes! is offline
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One I've been wondering about is "hold by".

In Orthodox Jewish communities, it's a way of saying you follow a particular religious ruling- i.e., "I don't do X, I hold by Rabbi Ploni." I don't think I've heard it used in any way in the wider world. I don't know if there are other English speakers who say something similar, or if it's just a Yiddishism that found its way into Yinglish.
  #215  
Old 10-31-2017, 09:13 AM
wonky wonky is offline
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Originally Posted by Malleus, Incus, Stapes! View Post
One I've been wondering about is "hold by".

In Orthodox Jewish communities, it's a way of saying you follow a particular religious ruling- i.e., "I don't do X, I hold by Rabbi Ploni." I don't think I've heard it used in any way in the wider world. I don't know if there are other English speakers who say something similar, or if it's just a Yiddishism that found its way into Yinglish.
It's somewhat common where I grew up, almost always in the negative "I don't hold by these newfangled ideas."
  #216  
Old 10-31-2017, 10:35 AM
Pleonast Pleonast is offline
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Originally Posted by MrDibble View Post
Oh, that's how we say it here as well - so it's a "chest of draws" - even though you'll write "chest of drawers"
In my mid-Ohio accent: /dɹɔɹz/, rhymes with "wars". I'm not surprised a non-rhotic dialect like from New Jersey would drop the latter "r".
  #217  
Old 10-31-2017, 10:53 AM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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My Scottish grandmother used to use the term "He makes a good screw" to describe someone who had a good job/salary. This didn't go over well with the other wives in town until it was explained to her what that meant on this side of the pond.
  #218  
Old 10-31-2017, 11:04 AM
Cardigan Cardigan is offline
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Folks in the Great Lakes area frequently append unnecessary possessives to business names, regardless of whether it's in the name or not. e.g. Let's shop at Meijer's
  #219  
Old 10-31-2017, 11:42 AM
BobLibDem BobLibDem is offline
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Originally Posted by Cardigan View Post
Folks in the Great Lakes area frequently append unnecessary possessives to business names, regardless of whether it's in the name or not. e.g. Let's shop at Meijer's
Yes, we do. It just sounds right to us.
  #220  
Old 10-31-2017, 04:52 PM
Malleus, Incus, Stapes! Malleus, Incus, Stapes! is offline
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Originally Posted by jsgoddess View Post
It's somewhat common where I grew up, almost always in the negative "I don't hold by these newfangled ideas."
Oh, that's right!
  #221  
Old 10-31-2017, 06:26 PM
Filbert Filbert is online now
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Originally Posted by Cardigan View Post
Folks in the Great Lakes area frequently append unnecessary possessives to business names, regardless of whether it's in the name or not. e.g. Let's shop at Meijer's
That's common in quite a bit of England as well: I'm going to Lidl's, do you want anything?
  #222  
Old 10-31-2017, 06:41 PM
John Mace John Mace is offline
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That's common in quite a bit of England as well: I'm going to Lidl's, do you want anything?
I've lived all over the east coast in the US and in CA, and I've heard it commonly used in all those places. I use it myself, and I've never lived in the midwest.
  #223  
Old 10-31-2017, 07:18 PM
monstro monstro is offline
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African American Vernacular and Standard American English have all kinds of subtle differences.

AAVE: You mean.
SAVE: You are mean.

AAVE: You be mean.
SAVE: You are habitually mean.

AAVE: Where you stay at?
SAVE: Where do you live?

In AAVE, it is not uncommon to hear "been done." As in, "Why are you asking me when I'm going to graduate? I been done that." The emphasis is always on the "been", because the expression is only used when you're referring to something that happened a long time ago.

This is not the same thing as "done been". You use "done been" when you're referencing something that has been done in the past, but not necessarily a long time ago. As in, "Have I ever been to NYC? Yeah, I done been there." I don't know what American dialect(s) use "done been", but I've heard it used.
  #224  
Old 10-31-2017, 07:53 PM
John Mace John Mace is offline
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In ATVE, "Uh" is apparently the answer to any question asked by an adult.

ATVE = American Teenage Vernacular English.
  #225  
Old 10-31-2017, 08:22 PM
wonky wonky is offline
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Originally Posted by monstro View Post
African American Vernacular and Standard American English have all kinds of subtle differences.

AAVE: You mean.
SAVE: You are mean.

AAVE: You be mean.
SAVE: You are habitually mean.

AAVE: Where you stay at?
SAVE: Where do you live?

In AAVE, it is not uncommon to hear "been done." As in, "Why are you asking me when I'm going to graduate? I been done that." The emphasis is always on the "been", because the expression is only used when you're referring to something that happened a long time ago.

This is not the same thing as "done been". You use "done been" when you're referencing something that has been done in the past, but not necessarily a long time ago. As in, "Have I ever been to NYC? Yeah, I done been there." I don't know what American dialect(s) use "done been", but I've heard it used.
I mentioned multiple modals upthread, and this reminds me of them where there is a lot of nuance to the extra word that people might miss. I'll say "I might could do that" or "I might would like that" or "I shouldn't ought to do that" or even "I might should better do that." The emphasis can be on any modal, depending on the meaning.
  #226  
Old 10-31-2017, 08:23 PM
Melbourne Melbourne is offline
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Originally Posted by Malleus, Incus, Stapes! View Post
One I've been wondering about is "hold by".

In Orthodox Jewish communities, it's a way of saying you follow a particular religious ruling- i.e., "I don't do X, I hold by Rabbi Ploni." I don't think I've heard it used in any way in the wider world. I don't know if there are other English speakers who say something similar, or if it's just a Yiddishism that found its way into Yinglish.
Talking about religion, Melbourne.vic.aus, kids:

"Who do you go for?" ... "I go for the Hawks, who do you go for?" ... "Richmond"

I go for the Cats myself (Geelong).
  #227  
Old 11-01-2017, 11:54 PM
AppallingGael AppallingGael is offline
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I have skimmed the first 50 posts here, but the danger of my repeating someone else's example is for me outweighed by the additional time of mine it would take to read all five pages.

So--one of my favorite Britishisms is "didn't we?" and the like. For example, "We arrived yesterday, didn't we?" Or "Earth revolves around the sun, doesn't it?" "I'm more confident than I pretend to be, aren't I?"
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