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  #51  
Old 09-24-2017, 04:03 PM
JohnnyMac JohnnyMac is offline
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As someone whose anxiety (mildly) flares up talking to people on the phone...I think I could adjust to someone in a niqab, provided she was approachable and friendly. Eyes, body language, okay. I can do that.

A burka I don't think I could deal with. Dealing with doctors, making sure they really hear you, is intimidating and difficult at the best of times. I wouldn't say no out of hand, but I'm not confident I'd see her a second time. I don't know I'd get enough reassurance from someone I can't see.

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  #52  
Old 09-24-2017, 04:35 PM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is online now
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Warning Issued

Responding to a poster's comments that it "only exists in a neaderthal's right wing fantasy world" clearly is an insult. You can disagree without calling the poster a neanderthal. This thread has had a lot of varied opinions without resorting to insults and I want to keep it that way.

You crossed a line- rein it in.

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Originally Posted by Ramira View Post
this is a concept that only exists in the neanderthal far right fantasy worlds.
  #53  
Old 09-24-2017, 07:01 PM
Melbourne Melbourne is offline
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Originally Posted by BigT View Post
She's a cancer patient. I feel a lot of sympathy for her. But, try as I might, I cannot convince myself that replacing her doctor is the right thing to do. I can understand the action, and be sympathetic and not judge her for it, but, ultimately, I have to conclude that it's wrong.
.
Well, you might be right, but your oncologist is the one doctor who is likely to relate to you as a dying person, rather than just a medical case.. When you are feeling lost in a medical nightmare, it's nice to see a caring face.

(I don't know if the original partient is dying, or just has a lump that's been slowly growing for the last 85 years)

Last edited by Melbourne; 09-24-2017 at 07:01 PM.
  #54  
Old 09-26-2017, 09:32 PM
Thylacine Thylacine is offline
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I met my current GP when she was working locally part time doing all the women's business the Turkish Muslim male head of the practice could not. Now, I wouldn't go to a doctor who couldn't touch or examine me but it is a very busy practice and having a woman in two hours a week for hands on stuff seems enough for his female patients.

I would have more trouble with accidentally seeing a dr who considers it wrong to touch me than I would a dr who expressed their religion via dress. I am ok with not seeing faces if I see skills. I do live in an area where face coverings are not all that unusual. I may have felt differently before I got more used to it.


I followed the woman doctor to her general practice a few suburbs down rather than seeing two doctors for one body.
  #55  
Old 09-27-2017, 02:23 AM
PatrickLondon PatrickLondon is offline
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I'm not sure what I distrust more, the whole "a friend of a friend said it happened", or the assumption that it's beyond the wit of even the most anxious patient to say "I'm sorry, I can't quite make out what you're saying behind your burqa/surgical mask", or the implication that there are doctors of any kind, and particularly specialist oncologists, who are so untrained in bedside manner as not to try to put a patient at ease, ask if it's all right to talk in a particular way, or even, especially in the case of cancer, to offer the opportunity to have a recording of what's said, which is not uncommon practice.
  #56  
Old 09-27-2017, 06:28 AM
kayT kayT is offline
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If you are not familiar with doctors who are "so untrained in bedside manner as not to try to put a patient at ease", PatrickLondon, then doctors in London must be very different from many doctors I have met in the United States. Sadly, I have found doctors like that in Texas, Illinois, Wisconsin, and California.
  #57  
Old 09-27-2017, 11:17 AM
astorian astorian is offline
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In and of itself, seeing a doctor in a hijab would not scare me or turn me off, if I were assured by the referring doctor that she was good at her job. Sure, I'd be a bit surprised to see that, just as I'd be surprised to learn that my doctor was a Lubavitcher or a turban-wearing Sikh. But again, if my doctor told me "Dr. Cohen/Singh/Abdul" is the best in the field," I'd take his word for it.

That said, a Lubavitcher OR Sikh OR Islamic doctor who wears unusual garb should KNOW that his/her garb will startle some people, and should develop the people skills to put patients at ease. A sense of humor goes a long way, in that regard.
  #58  
Old 09-27-2017, 11:49 AM
Jennshark Jennshark is offline
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I would be very uncomfortable because when I deal with people I depend on being able to "read" a whole face -- they're smiling with their mouth, but are their eyes smiling? Does this person "look honest"? Is he/she saying something that his/her expression contradicts? Do they look impatient and distracted?

"Smiling eyes" and "honest face" are, of course, in the eye of the beholder; however, there is a lot of interesting research that addresses these things and how humans figure out who to trust (and not trust) and how amazingly quickly these impressions form.

I couldn't roll with this doctor and would change providers immediately. I would be fine with her in a classroom, as a colleague, a n accountant, and so on, but where my health is concerned I need to establish firm trust and wouldn't be able to do so without seeing her whole face.
  #59  
Old 09-27-2017, 12:46 PM
Dorjän Dorjän is offline
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A burqa wouldn't bother me at all, but as a hearing impaired individual I rely heavily on reading lips to understand conversation, so that would be a deal-breaker.
  #60  
Old 09-27-2017, 01:16 PM
Eyebrows 0f Doom Eyebrows 0f Doom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by astorian View Post
In and of itself, seeing a doctor in a hijab would not scare me or turn me off, if I were assured by the referring doctor that she was good at her job. Sure, I'd be a bit surprised to see that, just as I'd be surprised to learn that my doctor was a Lubavitcher or a turban-wearing Sikh. But again, if my doctor told me "Dr. Cohen/Singh/Abdul" is the best in the field," I'd take his word for it.

That said, a Lubavitcher OR Sikh OR Islamic doctor who wears unusual garb should KNOW that his/her garb will startle some people, and should develop the people skills to put patients at ease. A sense of humor goes a long way, in that regard.
This thread isn't about the hijab.
  #61  
Old 09-27-2017, 01:21 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickLondon View Post
I'm not sure what I distrust more, the whole "a friend of a friend said it happened", or the assumption that it's beyond the wit of even the most anxious patient to say "I'm sorry, I can't quite make out what you're saying behind your burqa/surgical mask", or the implication that there are doctors of any kind, and particularly specialist oncologists, who are so untrained in bedside manner as not to try to put a patient at ease, ask if it's all right to talk in a particular way, or even, especially in the case of cancer, to offer the opportunity to have a recording of what's said, which is not uncommon practice.
Whoa. No need to bring TRUST into it. I repeated a story I heard. I wasn't there. You weren't there. I don't know who said what to whom. Neither do you. I extrapolated my question, "would it bother you if you couldn't see your doctor's face?" from that sketchy anecdote.

Quote:
Originally Posted by astorian View Post
In and of itself, seeing a doctor in a hijab would not scare me or turn me off, if I were assured by the referring doctor that she was good at her job. Sure, I'd be a bit surprised to see that, just as I'd be surprised to learn that my doctor was a Lubavitcher or a turban-wearing Sikh. But again, if my doctor told me "Dr. Cohen/Singh/Abdul" is the best in the field," I'd take his word for it.

That said, a Lubavitcher OR Sikh OR Islamic doctor who wears unusual garb should KNOW that his/her garb will startle some people, and should develop the people skills to put patients at ease. A sense of humor goes a long way, in that regard.
A hijab shows the face. So not a problem IMHO.

As for religious garb, or clothing not like that worn by regular folks walking around in the street today: Not so long ago entire hospital systems were run and staffed by nuns who wore clearly identifiable religious garb that made them stand out in today's world, but which, ironically, was often chosen at the time their orders were founded in centuries past, to make them blend in with other womenfolk. Often a nun's habit was the common garb of a widow of that time and place. The idea was NOT to stand out, but as the centuries wore on, well... they really stood out, which is why many switched to white blouses and skirts from Wal-Mart, so as to blend in better.
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