Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-14-2017, 06:55 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,138
A gecko in the house.

We have seen Mediterranean house geckos outside, but Mrs. Plant (v.3.0) found one living near the aquarium stand. We would like to capture him and take him outside before the cat gets him. Temps will remain warm in Arkansas for another month at most. She reports he already as a stumpy tail.
Any gecko trappers here?
  #2  
Old 10-14-2017, 07:26 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 37,286
How to catch a gecko.

Seems to me like the shoebox method might be the most useful, especially if you can maintain it so it is warmer and more humid than the room.

You could also tell it you want to buy insurance.
  #3  
Old 10-14-2017, 10:04 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,138
Thanks!
The insurance thing might work...
  #4  
Old 10-14-2017, 10:19 PM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 4,628
Quote:
Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
Thanks!
The insurance thing might work...
If Mrs. Plant didn't say "Uh-oh, better get gecko", you should conciser upgrading to v4.0...

Meanwhile, the idea of something called the "Mediterranean gecko" in Arkansas got me to googling. Introduced species. Apparently found here in South Carolina, too. (Along with several other species of lizard--now I"m wondering why I've never seen anything other than what I've always heard called a "streakfield.")

Back to the gecko, apparently they bark. So maybe your cat will say "yeah, fuck this shit" and leave it alone.

Last edited by Darren Garrison; 10-14-2017 at 10:20 PM.
  #5  
Old 10-14-2017, 10:29 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
Meanwhile, the idea of something called the "Mediterranean gecko" in Arkansas got me to googling. Introduced species. Apparently found here in South Carolina, too. (Along with several other species of lizard--now I"m wondering why I've never seen anything other than what I've always heard called a "streakfield.")
She works nights, and when I see her off at 9:00 PM on warm nights she sometimes points out a gecko on the outside wall close to the mailbox. They are fast little suckers.
Perhaps I should use a wet mailbox as a trap. Hmmm...
  #6  
Old 10-14-2017, 11:38 PM
Beckdawrek Beckdawrek is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: So.Ark ?
Posts: 1,704
My cats catch them all the time, usually they don't kill and never do they eat them, guess they taste bad. I have never called them geckos, they are just lizards. Ignorance has been stomped on again.
  #7  
Old 10-14-2017, 11:46 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 37,286
I've got them in my apartment in Panama. They're the closest thing I have to pets.
  #8  
Old 10-15-2017, 12:37 AM
TokyoBayer TokyoBayer is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Taiwan
Posts: 9,049
We get them here in Taiwan. Wife doesn't like them, but the kids and I don't mind. Catching them in the house is tricky because of all the places they can hide.
  #9  
Old 10-15-2017, 02:49 AM
dba Fred dba Fred is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Arizona
Posts: 963
A meal worm in one hand and a fish scoop in the other (both available at a pet store).

It sounds more like a chirp than a bark to me; I approximate the sound by drawing in air between the teeth and cheek.
  #10  
Old 10-15-2017, 03:45 AM
cochrane cochrane is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: The Nekkid Pueblo
Posts: 18,947
I've seen geckos inside my house here in Arizona. They usually cling high on the walls near the ceiling. I leave them alone as they're beneficial and they'll usually find their way back outside.
  #11  
Old 10-15-2017, 02:17 PM
Hari Seldon Hari Seldon is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Trantor
Posts: 11,181
The place I used to stay at in Barbados had a gecko living behind a large photo on the wall. It would come out regularly. It didn't bother us and we never bothered it. Why should we? Maybe it ate some bugs.
  #12  
Old 10-15-2017, 02:28 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
Elephant Whisperer
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 38,307
They're in Hawaii of course, but while we've seen some in our condominium complex and even a couple inside our unit, not as much as we'd like. And we do like them.

They are rampant in Thailand. I remember finding the flattened remains of one inside the door jamb of my house in the North way back when. Poor fellow.
__________________
Carpe diem! But first, coffee.
  #13  
Old 10-15-2017, 02:29 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siam Sam View Post
They are rampant in Thailand. I remember finding the flattened remains of one inside the door jamb of my house in the North way back when. Poor fellow.
Something else to worry about in addition to cats.
  #14  
Old 10-15-2017, 02:34 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
Elephant Whisperer
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 38,307
Another one in Bangkok we found flattened inside the folds of this floor mat / pillow. That's always the wife's objection to them, that we could squash them. Otherwise, they're actually beneficial, eating mosquitoes and other bugs.
__________________
Carpe diem! But first, coffee.
  #15  
Old 10-15-2017, 02:52 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 37,286
Quote:
Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
Something else to worry about in addition to cats.
Once I came home from work, turned on the ceiling fan, poured myself a beer, and sat down in my easy chair. After about a minute I heard loud SPLAT! I looked over and found a dead gecko at the base of the wall.

Apparently he had been resting on top of one of the fan blades. He was able to hang on for a while but once the fan got up to full speed he was flung against the wall.

A while ago when I had some untidy neighbors in the apartment below I had a roach infestation. Once or twice I reflexively swatted a roach to find it was a gecko, much to my chagrin.

Now that I don't have roaches I can assume any little scurrying animal in the apartment is a gecko and leave it be.
  #16  
Old 10-15-2017, 03:00 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
Elephant Whisperer
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 38,307
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
A while ago when I had some untidy neighbors in the apartment below I had a roach infestation. Once or twice I reflexively swatted a roach to find it was a gecko, much to my chagrin.
Reminds me of a friend of a friend in Thailand. This was a lady from Texas, sent to Thailand by her church in some sort of missionary capacity. She was a real piece of work. Lived in the main northern city of Chiang Mai, a thoroughly modern city chock full of Western conveniences, restaurants etc. Lived in an ultra-modern condo with all the conveniences -- air-conditioning, cable TV, washer/dryer, refrigerator etc. But she was supposed to write an account of her doings once a month for the church newsletter back home. This pampered and spoiled lady made it sound like she was on the Lewis and Clark Expedition. One of the many "hardships" she detailed was this gecko invasion and how she had to beat them mercilessly with a broom.
__________________
Carpe diem! But first, coffee.

Last edited by Siam Sam; 10-15-2017 at 03:01 PM.
  #17  
Old 10-15-2017, 10:46 PM
Topologist Topologist is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 335
When I was a kid we lived in the Philippines for a few years. It was said that a house was not a home unless it had geckos living in it. You didn't want to chase them away.
  #18  
Old 10-15-2017, 11:01 PM
Trancephalic Trancephalic is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 863
If the insurance fails, try Dana Gould
  #19  
Old 10-15-2017, 11:21 PM
Noel Prosequi Noel Prosequi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: In the Ning Nang Nong
Posts: 1,294
Lots here in Brisbane Australia, too. Plus is that they eat spiders. Minus is that they find their way into air conditioners where they die and clog up various important functions.
  #20  
Old 10-16-2017, 04:15 AM
wolfpup wolfpup is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 7,481
You people living in the southern climes amaze me. As a resident of the Great White North, where the largest and most terrifying of nature's beasts usually found in urban houses is the common housefly, if I found a lizard in the house I'd consider it a Major Emergency. Like, the kind that 911 was invented for!

Actually I'm going to give myself credit for commendable bravery in the face of danger on one rare occasion. I once heard loud noises in the living room late one night, things being knocked over, etc. I went out to investigate and found ... a masked home invader! Yep, a raccoon had come down the chimney and was sitting on the fireplace mantle! It was looking at me like, yeah, I know, maybe not the smartest thing I ever did, but now I'm here, and what are ya gonna do about it?

I was half asleep and anxious to continue my slumbers, so I opened the front door, got a broom, and after a bit of sword-like manoevering the raccoon exited the front door and went off into the night, leaving a living-room full of sooty pawprints.

I had no dog at the time or the consequences could have been a good deal more lively!
  #21  
Old 10-16-2017, 08:08 AM
chappachula chappachula is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 5,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hari Seldon View Post
The place had a gecko living behind a large photo on the wall. It would come out regularly. It didn't bother us and we never bothered it.
Why should we?
Why?--
Well...because.....it's a CREEPY CRAWLY LIZARD!!!!!
And inside a house, creepy crawly things are scary and gross.

I do.not.like.critters in my house.
(Unless they are furry and purr. )

Now, outdoors, they are free to live in peace in my garden, happily communing with the ants and the bugs, while they engage in political negotiations and peace treaties with the neighbor's cats.

But indoors they scare me.
  #22  
Old 10-16-2017, 12:24 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 37,286
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfpup View Post
You people living in the southern climes amaze me. As a resident of the Great White North, where the largest and most terrifying of nature's beasts usually found in urban houses is the common housefly, if I found a lizard in the house I'd consider it a Major Emergency. Like, the kind that 911 was invented for!
Quote:
Originally Posted by chappachula View Post
Why?--
Well...because.....it's a CREEPY CRAWLY LIZARD!!!!!
And inside a house, creepy crawly things are scary and gross.
These guys are tiny, cute, totally harmless, and quite useful. I enjoy having them.

Last edited by Colibri; 10-16-2017 at 12:24 PM.
  #23  
Old 10-16-2017, 01:00 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
and quite useful. I enjoy having them.
I'll ask him to bring his friends.
  #24  
Old 10-16-2017, 01:32 PM
astorian astorian is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: austin tx usa
Posts: 34,274
I could send my son over- he catches the dang things nearly every night!

Warning: if you catch one in your hand, it will probably shed its tail. Seriously, that's a standard defense. When caught, they shed their tails. The tails keep wiggling for a few minutes after separation. That may attract the predator's attention, giving the little guy a chance to escape. That's why you see many with stumpy tails. (They grow back, but usually not as long or as nicely as before).

Last edited by astorian; 10-16-2017 at 01:35 PM.
  #25  
Old 10-16-2017, 01:52 PM
BeeGee BeeGee is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 914
They're everywhere here. I try to catch them because my cat will tear up a lizard and the rest of my apartment trying to play with it. At work, there are no cats, but there are a few "EEK! A LIZARD" types who will squash one for no damned good reason. I've never had one shed it's tail, but I've never tried to hold it's tail either. One of the easiest ways is to use a sheet of paper in either hand and induce it to run onto the paper. Then I walk it outside and put it down near water. Usually in Tony's plants next door. If it weren't for the cats, I'd leave them alone in the house.
  #26  
Old 10-16-2017, 01:58 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by astorian View Post

Warning: if you catch one in your hand, it will probably shed its tail. Seriously, that's a standard defense. When caught, they shed their tails. The tails keep wiggling for a few minutes after separation. That may attract the predator's attention, giving the little guy a chance to escape. That's why you see many with stumpy tails. (They grow back, but usually not as long or as nicely as before).
Mrs. Plant (v.3.0) reports that our gecko has a stumpy tail, do doubt due to a cat.
  #27  
Old 10-16-2017, 02:04 PM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 4,628
Quote:
Originally Posted by astorian View Post
(They grow back, but usually not as long or as nicely as before).
Does the color match? I'm thinking of this guy that I once saw at the Riverbanks Zoo in Columbia, SC (outside any of the exhibits--he was apparently a visitor, too.) Note the different color of the tail.
  #28  
Old 10-16-2017, 02:11 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 37,286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
Does the color match? I'm thinking of this guy that I once saw at the Riverbanks Zoo in Columbia, SC (outside any of the exhibits--he was apparently a visitor, too.) Note the different color of the tail.
That's not a gecko, it's a Carolina Anole, popularly known as "chameleons" because they can change from brown to green. They also shed and grow back their tails, but not as easily as geckos.

The re-grown tail will usually be shorter and slightly different in color. Your anole looks like it has a re-grown tail based on the color difference.

Last edited by Colibri; 10-16-2017 at 02:15 PM.
  #29  
Old 10-16-2017, 02:24 PM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 4,628
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
That's not a gecko
I didn't claim that it was, merely that it had the trait of tail regeneration.
  #30  
Old 10-16-2017, 02:28 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
That's not a gecko, it's a Carolina Anole, popularly known as "chameleons" because they can change from brown to green. They also shed and grow back their tails, but not as easily as geckos.
There are many of those in the woods here, AKA American chameleon.
  #31  
Old 10-16-2017, 02:38 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 37,286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
I didn't claim that it was, merely that it had the trait of tail regeneration.
Since the subject of the thread is geckos, it was worth pointing it out.
  #32  
Old 10-16-2017, 02:41 PM
astorian astorian is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: austin tx usa
Posts: 34,274
Quote:
Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
There are many of those in the woods here, AKA American chameleon.
My son catches those all the time, too. They're out in the daytime, while the Mediterranean geckos come out after dark.

The male anoles are hilarious to watch in the Spring, when they start doing pushups to impress the ladies.
  #33  
Old 10-16-2017, 02:53 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by astorian View Post
The male anoles are hilarious to watch in the Spring, when they start doing pushups to impress the ladies.
I remember seeing them do that when I lived in the woods.
  #34  
Old 10-16-2017, 03:13 PM
Irishman Irishman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Houston, TX, USA
Posts: 12,193
My brother, sister, and I discovered lizards one trip we went to Texas to visit family. We caught 4 or 5, a couple were "chameleons", and a couple were more textured like an Eastern Fence Lizard. We took them home, but didn't know how to keep them, and this was BG (before Google), so we let them loose in the back yard in a fence pile. Saw them on occasion for a while.
  #35  
Old 10-16-2017, 03:17 PM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 4,628
So after having said that the only lizards I see here are "streakfields", I walk onto the porch just now and making it's way down a baluster was something that wasn't one--I didn't get a great look at it, but I think it was another Carolina Anole. (This is an especially weird coincidence--not only is running across a lizard not an every day thing for me, it isn't even an every year thing.)
  #36  
Old 10-16-2017, 03:35 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
So after having said that the only lizards I see here are "streakfields", I walk onto the porch just now and making it's way down a baluster was something that wasn't one--I didn't get a great look at it, but I think it was another Carolina Anole. (This is an especially weird coincidence--not only is running across a lizard not an every day thing for me, it isn't even an every year thing.)
They are beginning to keep track of everyone who posts in this thread.
I for one welcome our new reptile masters.
  #37  
Old 10-16-2017, 05:42 PM
Icarus Icarus is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: In front of my PC, y tu?
Posts: 4,109
Living in a mediterranean climate, my previous house was affectionately named "Spider Ranch", as that seemed to be the livestock we were raising. Soon enough, the lizards moved in, as there was plenty of good eatin'. They weren't geckos, just some version on stripers. They found their way indoors, much to the amusement of our indoor-only cats. Never a bother, really. I considered them to be contributing members of the household (by eating the bugs).
__________________
Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.
- C. Darwin
  #38  
Old 10-16-2017, 08:11 PM
Atamasama Atamasama is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,618
I lived on Guam for a couple years. Lots of geckos and anoles everywhere. The geckos were more common but anoles were still pretty abundant.

I never had problems with geckos as they kept the population of flies, ants, and cockroaches lower. But the tail thing was creepy.

Anoles on the other hand could be aggressive. They were small but bigger than geckos and I had a couple jump on me and scratch me (not harmful but sure freaked me out).
  #39  
Old 10-16-2017, 09:19 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atamasama View Post
Anoles on the other hand could be aggressive. They were small but bigger than geckos and I had a couple jump on me and scratch me (not harmful but sure freaked me out).
They never attacked me. I found some dead, closed up in a window.
I am told that to capture them for pets, plastic sheeting is spread out under a tree, and the tree shaken. The anoles fall out, and can't walk on the slick plastic.
  #40  
Old 10-16-2017, 11:54 PM
Dag Otto Dag Otto is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Las Cruces
Posts: 4,911
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siam Sam View Post
I remember finding the flattened remains of one inside the door jamb of my house in the North way back when. Poor fellow.
I read this thread earlier today, as I have seen a few house geckos lately. This evening, I happened to discover a dead gecko that was half flattened high, stuck on the door. Dried out, no idea how long ago it died. Weird to read about something obscure like that and then see it a few hours later.
__________________
Take the pebble from my hand and I'll smack you in the mouth with this bamboo staff, Grasshopper.


John Stossel is a fuckwaffle
  #41  
Old 10-17-2017, 11:01 AM
Mixolydian Mixolydian is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Exoburb, FL
Posts: 1,004
Since geckos are typically much slower than the garden variety lizards we typically see here in Florida, the easiest method to catch/release:

1. Find a drinking cup - disposable would be preferred if you don't think washing it out afterwards would be sufficient.

2. Place inverted cup over gecko, hopefully without catching their tail.

3. Without lifting, slide a piece of paper (larger than the cup opening) under the cup.

4. Carefully lift the cup with the paper and gecko therein.

5. Release outside.
  #42  
Old 10-17-2017, 03:12 PM
Snake_Plissken Snake_Plissken is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 9
We have geckos, anoles and curly tailed lizards in abundance here in FLL. Many find their way onto my screened porch. Most of those are ambushed by the cat. The cat plays rough so most don't survive. Anyway...a gecko was evidently shading itself in the gap between the top of my front door and the frame. When I opened the door it fell directly down the back of my shirt. I did a little dance in the front yard to the great amusement of my children.
  #43  
Old 10-17-2017, 03:23 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snake_Plissken View Post
We have geckos, anoles and curly tailed lizards in abundance here in FLL. Many find their way onto my screened porch. Most of those are ambushed by the cat. The cat plays rough so most don't survive. Anyway...a gecko was evidently shading itself in the gap between the top of my front door and the frame. When I opened the door it fell directly down the back of my shirt. I did a little dance in the front yard to the great amusement of my children.
Hence your online name?
  #44  
Old 10-21-2017, 12:14 AM
CelticKnot CelticKnot is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: 2 hours from somewhere
Posts: 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atamasama View Post
I lived on Guam for a couple years. Lots of geckos and anoles everywhere. The geckos were more common but anoles were still pretty abundant.

I never had problems with geckos as they kept the population of flies, ants, and cockroaches lower. But the tail thing was creepy.

Anoles on the other hand could be aggressive. They were small but bigger than geckos and I had a couple jump on me and scratch me (not harmful but sure freaked me out).
We had geckos in our homes on Saipan many times. The tails were unsettling when they were wiggling on the floor. Geckos, unfortunately, are quite adept at finding inconvenient places to die. The worst was recounted by a friend: bread in the toaster, an unpleasant burning smell, toasted gecko.

Honestly, if geckos were controlling the roach population, we would have needed shovels to navigate our apartments. And then there were the termites....
  #45  
Old 10-22-2017, 02:46 PM
astorian astorian is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: austin tx usa
Posts: 34,274
There are all kinds of lizards in South Florida, including many invasive species. Last time I was there, my son caught loads of them. The curly tailed lizards were the most elusive AND the quickest to bite.
  #46  
Old 10-22-2017, 11:58 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Here
Posts: 11,566
I still have the same one.See Just bought pair o' belly-to-belly spreadeagled dried bat lizards on a stick. What are they? [pix]
  #47  
Old 10-23-2017, 10:09 AM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Here
Posts: 11,566
Also note: OP name/subject
  #48  
Old 11-04-2017, 09:22 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,138
I found one on the patio in fallen leaves. I brought him inside to show Mrs. Plant (v.3.0) and released him into the grass.
  #49  
Old 11-05-2017, 03:24 AM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
Elephant Whisperer
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 38,307
Quote:
Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
I found one on the patio in fallen leaves. I brought him inside to show Mrs. Plant (v.3.0) and released him into the grass.
... where he is now telling all the other geckos about his alien abduction.
__________________
Carpe diem! But first, coffee.
  #50  
Old 11-05-2017, 07:35 AM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 54,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siam Sam View Post
... where he is now telling all the other geckos about his alien abduction.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:35 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2017 Sun-Times Media, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017