Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-22-2017, 10:47 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
I had an abnormal screening mammogram.

Yesterday, I went to another center to have a more advanced mammogram, as well as a breast ultrasound, and the doctor found something that she called an "architectural anomaly" and she wants me to have a needle biopsy, which is scheduled for next Thursday. I know women (and men too) have this done all the time, and the findings are usually benign, but I'm still terrified.

Of course, me the idiot had to consult Dr. Google and really scared myself. None of the images looked anything like what they found; mine was so small, it required significantly blowing up the image, and it kind of looks like a river with a wide spot in it. It's probably a milk duct.

I guess the absolute worst case scenario is that they're going to catch a cancer at stage zero, and they'll get it all in the surgical biopsy. That's all I can think about.
  #2  
Old 09-22-2017, 11:07 PM
Beckdawrek Beckdawrek is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: So.Ark ?
Posts: 1,769
I will be with you in spirit next thur. Good thoughts and karma will come your way!
  #3  
Old 09-22-2017, 11:11 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
The doctor did say that what I have is usually benign, but a biopsy is the only way to tell for sure. That's one positive thing.
  #4  
Old 09-22-2017, 11:12 PM
dropzone dropzone is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Cloud Cuckoo Land
Posts: 28,043
Kid, I am loading happy thoughts on you. Okay, I'm skimming off the happiest, but they're yours, because you are a bud.
__________________
This seems to be pretty definitive.
posted by logicpunk at 10:07 AM on December 20, 2007 [3 favorites]

Last edited by dropzone; 09-22-2017 at 11:13 PM.
  #5  
Old 09-22-2017, 11:16 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
Quote:
Originally Posted by dropzone View Post
Kid, I am loading happy thoughts on you. Okay, I'm skimming off the happiest, but they're yours, because you are a bud.
Thank you for the kind words.

Last night, I caved and took a Valium and drank a little wine a few hours later. People on another website said, "You didn't cave. You did what you had to." Really, it WAS a little wine - one of those single-serving bottles they sell at the grocery store for $1 or so. I keep a couple on hand for tough times like this.
  #6  
Old 09-22-2017, 11:33 PM
AK84 AK84 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 13,943
Best of luck. Health scares are the worst. Dr Google; there is only one thing worse than looking up symptoms, and that is test results. Google cannot replace medical degrees. And I sympathize, I have done it too, you are looking for reassurance and end up thinking about fixing your will.
  #7  
Old 09-23-2017, 12:04 AM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
As a non-practicing HCP, believe me, I know many of the worst case scenarios that could happen.

It's not uncommon for student nurses, doctors, and other HCPs to think they have every disease they're learning about.
  #8  
Old 09-23-2017, 12:24 AM
Sunny Daze Sunny Daze is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Oregon
Posts: 7,548
I did the same thing when I had to get a biopsy. I ended up convinced that I had a 40% chance of cancer. I was terrified, and worried about leaving my young children without a mother. It turned out fine. There are no guarantees of course, but try not to let Google be your diagnostician. The Dr. is the one who actually has seen you.

Sending you best wishes. {{{hugs}}}
  #9  
Old 09-23-2017, 01:20 AM
dropzone dropzone is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Cloud Cuckoo Land
Posts: 28,043
Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
It's not uncommon for student nurses, doctors, and other HCPs to think they have every disease they're learning about.
And can has ANYBODY been more annoying? I've known more than those asshole, but roll my eyes and maintain.
__________________
This seems to be pretty definitive.
posted by logicpunk at 10:07 AM on December 20, 2007 [3 favorites]
  #10  
Old 09-23-2017, 01:24 AM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
Quote:
Originally Posted by dropzone View Post
And can has ANYBODY been more annoying? I've known more than those asshole, but roll my eyes and maintain.
Huh?
  #11  
Old 09-23-2017, 02:52 AM
dropzone dropzone is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Cloud Cuckoo Land
Posts: 28,043
Take whatever someone says with a grain of salt, as even the most over-educated may be wrong.
__________________
This seems to be pretty definitive.
posted by logicpunk at 10:07 AM on December 20, 2007 [3 favorites]
  #12  
Old 09-23-2017, 07:54 PM
Patx2 Patx2 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1,916
Hugs to you! I wish you the best!
  #13  
Old 09-23-2017, 08:15 PM
Miss Mapp Miss Mapp is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Rockville, MD
Posts: 2,769
nearwildheaven, from the way you describe it, it sounds like at the very worst it may be what I had about 4 years ago--the mildest form of DCIS or, as I call it, the teensiest bout of breast cancer. They got the whole problem area out with very good margins; I took Tamoxifen for awhile, and talked to a radiation oncologist but decided against going through that kind of therapy since it seemed like overkill in my case.

Considering what some women go through, I think I suffered the minimal amount of pain and inconvenience over it and was more frightened by the possibilities than by anything that actually happened. I've been clear in all my subsequent mammograms.

Best of luck to you.
__________________
Miss Elizabeth Mapp might have been forty, and she had taken advantage of this opportunity by being just a year or two older.
- E.F. Benson, "Miss Mapp"
  #14  
Old 09-23-2017, 09:07 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 11,387
It's definitely not time to worry yet and certainly not to be terrified. I've had friends who have had multiple biopsies over the years and they turned up nothing every time.

The biopsy itself may freak you out, not because it's painful (it's not), but because, depending on where the spot is in your boob that they want to see, you may be asked to lie facedown on a table and hang your boobs through a hole in the table so the radiologist can roll (in his/her rolling chair) UNDER you to do the deed. I'm not making this up. When my biopsy was scheduled, I googled it and, holy crap, I couldn't believe what I was seeing. As it turns out, you have to remember that they do this all day every day, so this totally strange position is no big deal to them.

My good friend had her biopsy lying on her back because of where the place was that they wanted to check out.

My sitch turned out to be very much like Miss Mapp's-- small Stage 1 cancer, lumpectomy, good margins, some radiation, and an estrogen blocker. Mine really was no big deal. Some cases are, of course, big deals-- not to minimize them. But it's too early for you to worry much.

Keep that picture in your head of you lying facedown (or almost facedown) like a car on a lift, and you'll be too weirded out to be terrified.
  #15  
Old 09-23-2017, 10:02 PM
Two Many Cats Two Many Cats is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 3,503
Yeah, the worst part is the waiting.

Strength to you, and drink if you want.
  #16  
Old 09-23-2017, 11:14 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
I've definitely heard of the face-down breast exam, and it makes sense to me, because that way it's easier to immobilize the breast and find the area they need to examine. They will also put a small wire in the area, which is big enough to show up on an x-ray but not enough to cause problems with MRI machines. This way, it will be easier to locate should that be needed for future reference.
  #17  
Old 09-23-2017, 11:18 PM
dropzone dropzone is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Cloud Cuckoo Land
Posts: 28,043
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
The biopsy itself may freak you out, not because it's painful (it's not), but because, depending on where the spot is in your boob that they want to see, you may be asked to lie facedown on a table and hang your boobs through a hole in the table so the radiologist can roll (in his/her rolling chair) UNDER you to do the deed. I'm not making this up. When my biopsy was scheduled, I googled it and, holy crap, I couldn't believe what I was seeing. As it turns out, you have to remember that they do this all day every day, so this totally strange position is no big deal to them.
Will I never stop falling for women whose medical experience is so stupidly adorable?

"This morning I was in surgery and this guy's bowels were spread on the table. All I could think was, 'Will they have lasagna in the cafeteria?'"

Her, I married.

Last edited by dropzone; 09-23-2017 at 11:19 PM.
  #18  
Old 09-24-2017, 12:17 AM
dropzone dropzone is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Cloud Cuckoo Land
Posts: 28,043
NWH, understand that we are rooting for you. Weekends are the worst. Keep us posted.

Last edited by dropzone; 09-24-2017 at 12:18 AM.
  #19  
Old 09-24-2017, 05:11 PM
Miss Mapp Miss Mapp is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Rockville, MD
Posts: 2,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
I've definitely heard of the face-down breast exam, and it makes sense to me, because that way it's easier to immobilize the breast and find the area they need to examine. They will also put a small wire in the area, which is big enough to show up on an x-ray but not enough to cause problems with MRI machines. This way, it will be easier to locate should that be needed for future reference.
There was a thread some time ago when ThelmaLou had her face-down needle biopsy. The advice I gave her then was:

a. You'll be wearing an open-in-front hospital gown or top; use the flap on whichever side as a sort of hammock to contain the breast that isn't going into the hole in the table. The first time I went through this, I felt as if the non-biopsied breast was going to fall down into the hole too and get in the way. There probably wasn't much danger of that really happening, but the second time, I felt more comfortable with it tucked out of the way.

b. You'll be lying there for 20-30 minutes while they're working on you, and you must keep perfectly still. Find some object in the room to fix your attention on and keep focused on that; it will keep you from feeling restless and wanting to shift position.
__________________
Miss Elizabeth Mapp might have been forty, and she had taken advantage of this opportunity by being just a year or two older.
- E.F. Benson, "Miss Mapp"
  #20  
Old 09-24-2017, 05:25 PM
iiandyiiii iiandyiiii is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 27,045
Best wishes nearwildheaven; I hope everything turns out to be safe!
  #21  
Old 09-24-2017, 05:39 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
I bought a 2-pack of sports bras to keep the girls in place afterwards.

Once again, I looked at images and those were spherical, whereas mine is like a thread or a cord. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I know I shouldn't look at them, but this time I came away very reassured.

Time will tell!
  #22  
Old 09-27-2017, 02:04 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
T-minus 24 hours. I'm starting to worry, even though I know I probably shouldn't.
  #23  
Old 09-27-2017, 03:47 PM
ivylass ivylass is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Orlando(ish)
Posts: 21,258
As a breast cancer survivor, I can tell you that IF you do have cancer, chances are it's caught early enough they can successfully treat it.

Breathe deep, do what you need to do to stay calm, and keep us updated.
  #24  
Old 09-27-2017, 05:01 PM
Helena330 Helena330 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Near Seattle, WA, USA
Posts: 2,831
Not much to say here, just that I'm thinking of you and sending hugs!
  #25  
Old 09-27-2017, 10:29 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
In the meantime, I saw an acquaintance who used to be an ultrasound technician. She said that whenever they caught a suspected cancer, of the breast or anywhere else, they would do a Doppler scan to determine blood flow, and this was easy even for a layperson to see because the B&W image would suddenly turn colorful. If they did this with me, I never saw it, and she said that I probably don't have anything to worry about, on top of the biopsy being scheduled a week after the diagnostic mammogram.



And she's been through this kind of thing twice herself, both with benign results.
  #26  
Old 09-27-2017, 10:45 PM
Sunny Daze Sunny Daze is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Oregon
Posts: 7,548
Best wishes.
  #27  
Old 09-28-2017, 12:21 AM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 11,387
Let us know. We expect a post even before you get up off the table. (Okay... maybe after you get back to your car.) Fingers crossed it will be nothing.
  #28  
Old 09-28-2017, 03:22 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 11,387
How did it go?
  #29  
Old 09-28-2017, 05:44 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
Turns out they don't do it face-down anymore, but I kind of wish they had, because while the doctor was numbing me up, I got really woozy and admitted that I hadn't eaten lunch, and they attributed it to that. They gave me some Sprite and sat me back up again when my color returned, and then the doctor got me all lined up and while it wasn't completely painless, it wasn't anything I couldn't handle. I was able to drive myself home afterwards, and took some Tylenol and have a cold pack in my bra that they gave me.

She (the doctor) will call me with the results on Monday or Tuesday. All signs point to it being benign, one of them (reading between the lines) that she had so much trouble finding the area she was going to biopsy.

They had me sitting up on the wheeled chair that looked like a giant Hoveround that also folded out into a bed, and also said they were grateful I spoke up, because too many people don't and they just kind of keel over. I'm sure they've seen it all.

In other words, mission accomplished.
  #30  
Old 09-28-2017, 07:09 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 11,387
Whether they do it face down or not seems to be related to where the spot is located in your breast. My good friend had her biopsy face up a couple of months ago. I had my facedown one quite recently-- only two years ago. Also, the radiologist came in IMMEDIATELY afterward and gave me the bad news. (He said, "I'm gonna give you the news you don't want to hear.") I preferred that to waiting at home for a phone call or letter.

Glad you got this part over with! Try not to fret over the weekend. And keep us posted.
  #31  
Old 09-28-2017, 10:19 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
ThelmaLou, they may have had reason to believe that yours was cancer, and sent it straight to the pathologist for an immediate look. The tech said that their center stopped doing face-down biopsies a couple years ago. Maybe it's just the center's policy; IDK.

Now that it's over, I'm really not all that worried about it.
  #32  
Old 09-29-2017, 12:05 AM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 11,387
Interesting.
  #33  
Old 09-29-2017, 01:21 AM
Sunny Daze Sunny Daze is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Oregon
Posts: 7,548
I'm glad it's over with.

Just to make things interesting, my biopsy was done while I was standing. Maybe the doctor just chooses what works for them?
  #34  
Old 09-29-2017, 09:54 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
I wore a sports bra to bed last night, and still have it on, and have NO pain in my breast. It's bruised a little bit but that's normal.
  #35  
Old 10-01-2017, 10:47 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
The bruise has surfaced, and it's finally a bit sore but it looks worse than it is (I HOPE!). Tomorrow or Tuesday, I finally get the results.
  #36  
Old 10-02-2017, 09:31 PM
dropzone dropzone is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Cloud Cuckoo Land
Posts: 28,043
Dear friend, my prayers are still with you.
__________________
This seems to be pretty definitive.
posted by logicpunk at 10:07 AM on December 20, 2007 [3 favorites]
  #37  
Old 10-02-2017, 10:23 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
Still no results, and I'm viewing it as "no news is good news".
  #38  
Old 10-02-2017, 10:50 PM
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 9,042
I had an "abnormal, but not alarming" PAP test a couple of years ago. No one knows why; next one was fine. I wasn't worried, because the only man I'd had sex with without condoms was my husband, and he had never had an STD, which put him at low risk for HPV. Plus, he had only had one partner before me that he had had sex with without condoms.

My sexual history made me extremely low-risk, and my next PAP was normal, albeit, a little on the edge of the bell curve.

Since my mother died of ovarian cancer, and on top of that, I an 50, and really sick of periods, I tried to parlay it into a hysterectomy, but no such luck.

I am due for a PAP in a couple of months, and not the least bit worried.

My point is, there are lots and lots of things that can look odd, and require investigation, but are not cancer. The mammogram is just a screening process. I have had several friends who had fluid-filled cysts on palpation (self-exam) that were nothing, and one who had a lipoma, that required surgical removal, and was biopsied for shits and giggles, but was nothing; It was excised under local anesthesia. She looked a little lopsided for awhile, but eventually the tissue evened out.
  #39  
Old 10-03-2017, 01:13 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
I got the news several hours ago.

It's "infiltrating ductal carcinoma".

I will need to schedule a consultation with a surgeon, who will probably order an MRI. I'm hoping a lumpectomy will take care of this. I mean, the radiologist herself could barely see it, so it can't be that bad, right? I hope so.

Thanks for all your support.

My parents don't know yet, and telling them is going to be tough because my mother got similar news 34 years ago.
  #40  
Old 10-03-2017, 01:32 PM
ivylass ivylass is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Orlando(ish)
Posts: 21,258
Oh, dear. I'm sorry to hear that. Keep in mind, this is not your mother's breast cancer. Most likely they can get it out with a lumpectomy, and if it's so small you may just need radiation.

Good luck.
  #41  
Old 10-03-2017, 02:01 PM
Miss Mapp Miss Mapp is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Rockville, MD
Posts: 2,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
I got the news several hours ago.

It's "infiltrating ductal carcinoma".

I will need to schedule a consultation with a surgeon, who will probably order an MRI. I'm hoping a lumpectomy will take care of this. I mean, the radiologist herself could barely see it, so it can't be that bad, right? I hope so.

Thanks for all your support.

My parents don't know yet, and telling them is going to be tough because my mother got similar news 34 years ago.
I think this a level up from what I had. In situ ductal carcinoma means it's still just inside the ducts; infiltrating means it's gotten out of the ducts. Lumpectomy should get it all out, if your margins--the non affected area around the site--are good. They'll tell you after surgery how good or small your margins were. You may have some follow-up treatment, which your medical providers will discuss with you re the best course to take in your situation.

Best of luck with your next steps. And a hug.
__________________
Miss Elizabeth Mapp might have been forty, and she had taken advantage of this opportunity by being just a year or two older.
- E.F. Benson, "Miss Mapp"
  #42  
Old 10-03-2017, 02:04 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
My consultation is on Monday, and he will probably order an MRI. They'll go from there.
  #43  
Old 10-03-2017, 02:08 PM
Sunny Daze Sunny Daze is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Oregon
Posts: 7,548
It sounds like they caught it very early, which is a good thing. Sending best wishes. If there's any way I can be of help, please let me know. Off hand, I am most likely to be of assistance with crucial tasks like sending puppy pictures, but I am also good at lending an ear, and I know the best swear words. {{{hugs}}}
  #44  
Old 10-03-2017, 03:00 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 11,387
Dang.

Mine was "invasive ductal carcinoma" (IDC). I had a lumpectomy and three weeks of radiation, no chemo. It was estrogen-positive, so I'm on Arimidex for at least five years (it's an estrogen-blocker, functionally similar to Tamoxifen, but for post-menopausal women).

I'd like to recommend the message boards at breastcancer.org. They're VAST, but there's a ton of information if you can wade your way through it. The one thing that I've found is that you likely won't find any other woman whose case is exactly like yours, because the variations are so many.

This is doable and you will get through it. It's an unwelcome surprise, but the fact that it was caught so early is a huge plus. Many thousands millions of women have gotten through this and if we can do it, you can do it. The picture is different from when your mom got her diagnosis decades ago. Still very sorry you got the bad news. Big hugs to you!
  #45  
Old 10-03-2017, 03:35 PM
Two Many Cats Two Many Cats is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 3,503
Your mom is still here, remember that.

Perhaps you can confide in her for comfort?
  #46  
Old 10-03-2017, 04:02 PM
Periwinkle Periwinkle is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 353
I am so sorry you are having to go through this! I hope your treatment plan swiftly conquers it and puts you in recovery very quickly. Wishing you all the best of luck and care.
  #47  
Old 10-03-2017, 04:32 PM
LSLGuy LSLGuy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Southeast Florida USA
Posts: 20,228
Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
I got the news several hours ago.

It's "infiltrating ductal carcinoma".

I will need to schedule a consultation with a surgeon, who will probably order an MRI. I'm hoping a lumpectomy will take care of this. I mean, the radiologist herself could barely see it, so it can't be that bad, right? I hope so.

Thanks for all your support.

My parents don't know yet, and telling them is going to be tough because my mother got similar news 34 years ago.
Damn. Not good, but not yet a disaster nor necessarily even a disaster in the making.

As ThelmaLou said, one thing is very much true. Breast cancer treatment today is nothing like the prancing witch doctors of 34 years ago. It is truly remarkable how far we've come in a short time. Much of what your Mom internalized then as truisms is simply outdated and wrong now.

Being worried, and treating this like the risky situation it is is 100% appropriate. Sorta like holding onto a rattlesnake. You don't need to scream or try to crush it. But you do need to pay strict attention and not let go of it.

The process now will be a maddening alternation of big rushes to get tests done Today Dammit, followed by a week of silently waiting for the results and them formulating a plan for the next steps. It's almost designed to make one crazy.

You might find this approach helpful: "My job is to learn more about what I do have, not what I might have. I won't try to get down the road beyond where we know we are now."

Good luck and keep us posted.

Last edited by LSLGuy; 10-03-2017 at 04:33 PM.
  #48  
Old 10-03-2017, 09:32 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
My mother found a lump, had it biopsied, and had a mastectomy when it came back malignant. We found out later that the biopsy got it all, but we didn't know that at the time and that's just how things were done in the early 1980s. And that's OK, because it saved many, many lives.

My grandmother was still living, in a retirement village, and one of her friends was a 50-year survivor! My mother had never known this about her, and imagine what things were like at THAT time. This woman saw her 100th birthday, too.

Honestly, I was never optimistic about this whole thing. I'm just glad I KNOW, and that I found out this early.
  #49  
Old 10-03-2017, 10:02 PM
dropzone dropzone is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Cloud Cuckoo Land
Posts: 28,043
Prayers are there, my friend.
  #50  
Old 10-05-2017, 12:59 AM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 8,961
For now, I'm going to avoid those "support" networks. The ones I've seen frighten me, and seem to be for people with advanced, relapsing, etc. disease. I don't need to see those stories right now.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:01 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2017 Sun-Times Media, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017