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Old 01-24-2014, 08:44 PM
LilyoftheField is offline
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wow, I saw a coyote in my backyard today!


...and I'm going to have to say it has changed my image of coyotes. Because I had never seen one before 'in the wild' so to speak. I live in suburbia. I have seen several hawks and once I saw a fox...but that's about the biggest wild predator that I have seen in real life not counting people, dogs and cats.

So, my idea of coyotes is that were kind of scrawny and skulking and maybe even a little mangy. You know kind of like a homely, underfed, neglected dog. Nothing like the magnificent healthy gorgeous mini-wolf that I saw in my yard this morning! It was amazing to me! I am so grateful that I was able to watch that clearly strong, young and healthy animal that casually loped through my yard today. He was only ten feet away from my deck and my dog barked at him through the window, causing him to glance in our direction. He had that pointy muzzled foxy wolfish face and he did not even pause, just continued on through my yard, through my neighbor's yard and off into the woodsy area across the road.

And now that I know that coyotes have moved that close to the neighborhood, looks like Markie is not going to be getting any more 'off leash' time outside...(and dammit, nobody was following him with a plastic bag to clean up his poop!)
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Old 01-24-2014, 08:48 PM
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Where do you live?

I've spotted, and heard, a lot of coyotes in the last couple of years in eastern Ontario. I presume the population of them is directly proportional to the deer population, so both seem to be growing considerably. Anecdotally speaking.
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Old 01-24-2014, 09:00 PM
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I got to be up close to a caged coyote that had been injured and was being kept at a wildlife sanctuary and they have the most beautiful multicolored coats. But yes, keep a close eye on your dog and if he's really little, definitely be wary about off leash time.
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Old 01-24-2014, 09:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
Where do you live?

I've spotted, and heard, a lot of coyotes in the last couple of years in eastern Ontario. I presume the population of them is directly proportional to the deer population, so both seem to be growing considerably. Anecdotally speaking.
You might be interested in this, which just made its debut the other day.

(I think PBS is available outside the US, but just in case, it's an episode of the Nature series that deals with the "Coywolf" [a wolf-coyote hybrid]. It originated about 90 years ago when western coyotes moved into territory that had been abandoned by eastern wolves due to deforestation. As it so happened, the two species met up in northern Ontario, and their descendants have been moving south ever since.)
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Old 01-24-2014, 09:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
Where do you live?

I've spotted, and heard, a lot of coyotes in the last couple of years in eastern Ontario. I presume the population of them is directly proportional to the deer population, so both seem to be growing considerably. Anecdotally speaking.
I live in northeast ohio and I did know that there were coyotes in the area - I've even heard them in the distance in the evening when I would walk with my dog, but I've never actually seen one before. The one that visited this morning was after a snow storm last night that left several inches on the ground. But the sun came out this morning and when I saw him it was sunny and bright on the new fallen snow. I had also thought that coyotes were more nocturnal, so it was especially surprising to see one this morning in the sunlight trotting through the deep snow. He looked well fed and I ascribe that to the fact that we had a very robust rabbit population this past summer!
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Old 01-24-2014, 09:19 PM
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Yes, they are beautiful creatures. And very smart. They know where the groceries are. They don't go hungry. Happy you had an opportunity to see this amazing creature in the wild.
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Old 01-24-2014, 09:19 PM
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We had a LOT of coyotes where I used to live. When it snowed, there were Coyote tracks everywhere. In the warm weather I could hear two packs howling back and forth to each other in the fields of the Christmas tree farm in front of our property. Eerie sound for sure.
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Old 01-24-2014, 09:20 PM
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Originally Posted by OttoDaFe View Post
You might be interested in this, which just made its debut the other day.

(I think PBS is available outside the US, but just in case, it's an episode of the Nature series that deals with the "Coywolf" [a wolf-coyote hybrid]. It originated about 90 years ago when western coyotes moved into territory that had been abandoned by eastern wolves due to deforestation. As it so happened, the two species met up in northern Ontario, and their descendants have been moving south ever since.)
Interesting. It played fine for me. Thanks.
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Old 01-24-2014, 09:21 PM
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I got to be up close to a caged coyote that had been injured and was being kept at a wildlife sanctuary and they have the most beautiful multicolored coats. But yes, keep a close eye on your dog and if he's really little, definitely be wary about off leash time.
My dog is not small enough to be considered 'prey' to a coyote. But I think if he were to chase after one or surprise it at a kill, there could be a fight - and my dog would not win! Normally, he is old enough and well trained enough that most mornings I let him out off leash to take care of business in the yard - and he comes right back. But I'm pretty sure that he would chase or otherwise take issue with, any coyote that might be in the area. And that would not end well. So I think I'm going to have to only let him out on his tie out now...
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Old 01-24-2014, 09:25 PM
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Meh. My pooch is a tiny Bichon, and I put her *out all the time in my rural Ottawa area. She's 12 years old and hasn't been munched yet.

*ETA: Off the leash I mean.

Last edited by Leaffan; 01-24-2014 at 09:25 PM.
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Old 01-24-2014, 10:38 PM
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Chicago has a population of tagged and collared coyotes, they've been tracked by wildlife people for years. It still surprises me when sightings get covered on the news, (except when one ends up in a store, of course that makes news) they're well known to live in the city and surrounding suburbs. They mostly stick to large parks and cemeteries, and tend to use the railroad tracks as means for travel, since the strips of land along the tracks are generally undisturbed by people.
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Old 01-24-2014, 10:46 PM
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Used to be a lot of coyotes on the campus of Cal Poly Pomona when I went to school there a decade ago. There also used to be a lot of wild rabbits that would hop along and get snatched up by the coyotes. I grew up near the bay area and never saw coyotes up there, so it was kind of surreal to see that happening so close to downtown L.A.
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Old 01-24-2014, 11:25 PM
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Coyotes follow humans. Humans kill their only natural predators (wolves) and leave food (garbage, cats, small dogs and small children) out for the taking.

Coyotes are amazing critters, smart, crafty and sneaky. While you might only see one at a time, they are pack animals. They are loyal and loving to their mates and cubs.

They will kill skunks to feed their cubs, they kill cats and gang up to kill dogs. They have been known to attack small children. Yes, I can show cites if needed, I'm kinda tired tonight and we are in MPSIMS.

Coyotes know to hide from the dominate predators AND for the most part, they know to look before crossing the road.

Coyotes are a perfect example of evolution in action in short time.

Oh sorry, for getting distracted for my admiration of coyotes as a species.

They are very beautiful animals and I'm glad you got a good look at one.
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Old 01-24-2014, 11:30 PM
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You might be interested in this, which just made its debut the other day.
We watched it. Amazed at how comfortable the animals were around people. And that bit toward the end, when the coyote encountered a dog. I expected some friendly butt-sniffing but neither seemed interested.
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Old 01-25-2014, 02:07 AM
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I come across them every once in while in the streets around here (East Hollywood/Los Feliz), which is next to Griffith Park, where they thrive. Interestingly, in the middle of Griffith Park is the zoo, where they have a lone coyote sadly kept in a cage.
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Old 01-25-2014, 02:14 AM
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He musta been after that Road Runner again. Did he have a strapped to his back with the word "ACME" painted on the side?
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Old 01-25-2014, 03:31 AM
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Originally Posted by LilyoftheField View Post
So, my idea of coyotes is that were kind of scrawny and skulking and maybe even a little mangy. You know kind of like a homely, underfed, neglected dog. Nothing like the magnificent healthy gorgeous mini-wolf that I saw in my yard this morning!
A coyote looks bigger and healthier in winter because its coat is fuller and more lustrous. If you see him again in the spring, he'll be shedding hair and will look more scrawny and mangy. He won't actually be mangy, and he won't be any less healthy. They just don't need a full lustrous coat in the summer.
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Old 01-25-2014, 08:05 AM
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We have an occasional coyote here in western Pennsylvania. A few years ago a neighbor came around and asked everyone if we minded him shooting any coyote. Surprisingly, no one minded. Had he asked about deer, squirrel, rabbit, etc everyone would have objected.
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Old 01-25-2014, 10:48 AM
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This thread is amusing. Round these parts, coyotes are considered a filthy nuisance and are killed on site.

I popped one a couple weeks ago, and "Gary", who I shot thru the neck a few years ago, is hanging over the back of a chair. His buddies are howling out back as I type this!
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Old 01-25-2014, 11:34 AM
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This thread is amusing. Round these parts, coyotes are considered a filthy nuisance and are killed on site.

I popped one a couple weeks ago, and "Gary", who I shot thru the neck a few years ago, is hanging over the back of a chair. His buddies are howling out back as I type this!
Probably howling "No Justice, No peace" in coyote.

"There Gary was, minding his own business, and Gatopescado just up and shot him. Gary wasn't doing nothing, he didn't deserve to die"

"No Justice, No Peace"



Capt
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Old 01-25-2014, 12:00 PM
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Coyotes hunt by day in Albuquerque, usually in open space parks or along the river. They don't seem terribly shy and I've gotten a few pictures. Mountain lions and bears sometimes come to town too, with the lions sometimes eating pets. The police usually tranquilize them and move them out to the wilderness.
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Old 01-26-2014, 09:03 AM
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My dog is not small enough to be considered 'prey' to a coyote. But I think if he were to chase after one or surprise it at a kill, there could be a fight - and my dog would not win! Normally, he is old enough and well trained enough that most mornings I let him out off leash to take care of business in the yard - and he comes right back. But I'm pretty sure that he would chase or otherwise take issue with, any coyote that might be in the area. And that would not end well. So I think I'm going to have to only let him out on his tie out now...
I've heard that sometimes they will have a lone coyote lure a dog into chasing them into the brush where the rest of the pack is waiting. They're smart. I would not count on having him tied up to keep him safe.

Last edited by River Hippie; 01-26-2014 at 09:05 AM.
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Old 01-26-2014, 10:59 AM
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Coyotes live on our property.

Even then, we rarely see them, as they most often move & hunt at night.

Many a nights I have been awoken by them. They rapidly yelp/bark for a minute or so, then go quiet. I am not sure what causes them to do this.

We also live about 1000 yards from a train track. When the train goes by, the engineer blows the whistle. The coyotes will respond to the whistle by howling in the same key as the whistle.
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Old 01-26-2014, 11:06 AM
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We have an occasional coyote here in western Pennsylvania. A few years ago a neighbor came around and asked everyone if we minded him shooting any coyote. Surprisingly, no one minded. Had he asked about deer, squirrel, rabbit, etc everyone would have objected.
I have mixed feelings about them.

On the one hand, I have respect for their intelligence, hunting skills, and survival instincts. On the other hand, they're not indigenous to Ohio (the first sighting was around 100 years ago), and they've destroyed the rabbit population. Given the latter, I have no problem with people shooting them.

Here in Ohio, it's open season on coyotes. If you have a hunting license, you can hunt them 365/24/7, with any caliber rifle, and there's no bag limit.
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Old 01-26-2014, 11:43 AM
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I live in a semi-suburban, semi-rural area on the North Shore of Massachusetts, and I've seen them in broad daylight at least three times, going about their business and not particularly impressed that a human was nearby observing them.

Once while riding my horse, who spotted the coyote before I did and stopped dead till it had trotted across our path and out of sight, then went ahead reluctantly with senses tuned to the place in the woods where it had disappeared.

Once while driving along a back road, when it crossed the road several dozen yards ahead of me and kept trotting across the field beyond, not appearing to care that my car had halted when I drew abreast so I could watch it go.

Once emerging from behind the greenhouse at the farm where I was boarding my horse, walking calmly onto the farm lane leading away from the barnyard where my car had just pulled in. It stopped, turned to look at me, paused, then turned away and trotted leisurely away toward the hay fields.

There's very restricted hunting of anything in my area, although there is a coyote hunting season. Even that is hedged about with restrictions -- necessary, I'd say, given how densely settled the region is despite its semi-rural character. Coyotes appear to know they're pretty safe, and don't have much fear of humans. Cats and dogs regularly go missing.
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Old 01-26-2014, 05:40 PM
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I used to have a three or four hundred yard wide field to the north of me separating my neighborhood from another. A small creek ran through it and the coyotes would pass through hunting and going to the open fields east of town. Then they routed the creek into an underground drainage pipe and built a development there.

Now my neighborhood is overrun with rabbits. I liked the coyotes much better.
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Old 01-26-2014, 05:44 PM
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I come across them every once in while in the streets around here (East Hollywood/Los Feliz), which is next to Griffith Park, where they thrive. Interestingly, in the middle of Griffith Park is the zoo, where they have a lone coyote sadly kept in a cage.
That's probably a very crazy coyote, poor critter.

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Originally Posted by Gatopescado View Post
This thread is amusing. Round these parts, coyotes are considered a filthy nuisance and are killed on site.

I popped one a couple weeks ago, and "Gary", who I shot thru the neck a few years ago, is hanging over the back of a chair. His buddies are howling out back as I type this!
I didn't say I wanted them hanging around in my back yard and eating the stray cats, I said that I admire their adaptability and how loyal and crafty they are.

Oh, and its sight or cite. Sorry, that's one of my peeves. Yeah, I've got a lot of them.
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Old 01-26-2014, 06:04 PM
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I prefer Foxes.
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Old 02-07-2014, 03:49 PM
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I've heard that sometimes they will have a lone coyote lure a dog into chasing them into the brush where the rest of the pack is waiting. They're smart. I would not count on having him tied up to keep him safe.
Also known to use a female in heat to lure out a dog to the rest of the pack. No dog, no matter how large is safe from them, really. They get overwhelmed by numbers.

Sorry about that "sight" error. I shoulda caught that. I are college educated, after all.
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Old 02-07-2014, 08:08 PM
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My dog is not small enough to be considered 'prey' to a coyote. But I think if he were to chase after one or surprise it at a kill, there could be a fight - and my dog would not win! Normally, he is old enough and well trained enough that most mornings I let him out off leash to take care of business in the yard - and he comes right back. But I'm pretty sure that he would chase or otherwise take issue with, any coyote that might be in the area. And that would not end well. So I think I'm going to have to only let him out on his tie out now...
Coyotes are territorial and view dogs as competition for food and mates. So they don't always view your dog as dinner. Where I live in Arizona they have been known to attack dogs being walked on leashes. And they are definitely not afraid of people. Where coyotes are abundant, it pays to be vigilant.
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Old 02-07-2014, 08:15 PM
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Coyotes can be rabid. Even if they can't beat your dog in a fight, they can give it rabies and you'll have to out him down. Or you might get bitten and you'll have to go through treatment for rabies.

I'd get a BB or pellet gun (that way you don't kill it) and drive it it off with a few well-placed shots. Better safe than sorry.
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Old 02-07-2014, 08:42 PM
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Also known to use a female in heat to lure out a dog to the rest of the pack. No dog, no matter how large is safe from them, really. They get overwhelmed by numbers.

Sorry about that "sight" error. I shoulda caught that. I are college educated, after all.
Coyotes are really pretty amazing. They are one of the few species of wild animals who's population increases with human expansion.

No, I'm sorry. I'm like the world's worst speeler and really should be the last to cast stones. Besides, on re-reading what you wrote, you could have meant that you shot them in situ, which really does make sense.
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