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  #1  
Old 04-12-2002, 10:00 AM
rookie23 rookie23 is offline
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Truth wanted: Does DuraLube actually work?

Or any of those miracle lubricants for that matter?

I want to know because i have a mechanic friend that says it doesn't work any better than synthetic oil. He says it's better to change oil frequently.

Is there any lubricant that does what DuraLube claims?

This has been on my mind for ages...
Seeing those DuraLube commercials almost made me buy the stuff...
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  #2  
Old 04-12-2002, 10:06 AM
EVO95 EVO95 is offline
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I believe DuraLube works in the sense that it's made somebody a pile of money, but other than that, I couldn't tell you. I'm hesitant to believe any of those claims, since I couldn't trust any "proof testing" done any more than any other marketing ploy. For the money, I'll stick to changing my Pennzoil every 3K. It's a great way to kill an hour out in the garage (two if you do it right) and a few beers, while the SO cleans toilets.
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  #3  
Old 04-12-2002, 10:21 AM
Pergau Pergau is offline
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Until I discovered what DuraLube is I thought this thread was going to be hot!
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  #4  
Old 04-12-2002, 10:43 AM
Gary T Gary T is offline
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Bob Sikorsky is an automotive engineer who has written several consumer-oriented books and has a weekly question and answer column that appears in many newspapers. I get aggravated with his column (I'm an auto repair professional) because he often seem to miss the point of what's has been asked, offering an answer that doesn't address the real question. Nevertheless, he is knowledgeable and well educated in automotive technology.

In one of his columns where he did appropriately answer the question, he clearly condemns DuraLube and Prolong because they contain chlorine compounds. While these are effective extreme-pressure additives, they are corrosive and do more harm than good over time. This is his area of expertise and I have confidence in his assessment.

Auto manufacturers and oil refiners invest a lot in research and development. The increasingly long life of most modern engines indicates their efforts are yielding good results. You can be sure that if DuraLube-type substances were beneficial, they would incorporate them in their products. The fact that they don't speaks volumes.

General rule of thumb: if it's advertised in an infomercial, it's probably not very good. If the product could stand on its own merits, it wouldn't be necessary to go to such elaborate lengths to try to sell it.
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  #5  
Old 04-12-2002, 02:16 PM
Morgainelf Morgainelf is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Gary T
General rule of thumb: if it's advertised in an infomercial, it's probably not very good. If the product could stand on its own merits, it wouldn't be necessary to go to such elaborate lengths to try to sell it.
Not pertinent to the DuraLube conversation, but I had to jump in. There are some great products advertised in infomercials. It can be a very cost effective means of direct advertising, and shouldn't reflect negatively on the product. There are some products that are so new/revolutionary/unusual that it is nearly impossible to demonstrate their merits in a retail situation. Direct marketing is sometimes the only way a company can ensure that a product is presented fairly.

DuraLube not withstanding.
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  #6  
Old 04-12-2002, 03:10 PM
Tedster Tedster is offline
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Yep, Bob Sikorsky has a great book "Drive it Forever" which is a good read for anyone trying to maintain their ride for any length of time.

Your mechanic friend is correct -- keeping fresh clean oil in your engine is the key, not miracle additives. STP (or the formula) was invented by Germany during world war II since they were trying to stretch their supplies of petroleum as far as they could. We aren't in that situation, thankfully.

Note that no aircraft manufacturers or associated companies recommend any kind of wonder-lube product -- they use synthetic oils exclusively in the jet aircraft. Know any pilots who put duralube in their rotary piston engine aircraft? Bet you can't find one. Would you put in your plane?
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  #7  
Old 04-12-2002, 07:26 PM
racer72 racer72 is offline
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Don't listen to anyone else on this subject. I am not quoting any so called experts who's opinion matter more if they get paid to mention the product (such as Mr. Sikorsky) nor am I giving a second hand opinion.

In 1989, I entered a demolition derby with a 1974 Chevy Impala station wagon. The car had a 350 engine with about 105,000 miles on it. All I did to the engine was change the oil, adding 5 quarts of Valvoline 50 weight racing oil and one bottle of Duralube. The first thing I noticed when hot lapping the car, it was running about 20 degrees cooler than when I drove the car on the road. On a race track, the engine should have run warmer. For the final smash em up, 36 cars took to the track in all out mayhem. 5 minutes in, I took a direct hit to the radiator and lost all my coolant. Of course, my temp gauge pegged at 260 degrees. In any normal engine, 5 minutes at that temperature will cook bearings and things will start to seize up. My car continued to run fine without water, a broken idler arm 20 minutes after the radiator went finally stopped me.

The car was drug home and sat for over a year without being touched. I had to move and sold what was left of the car for $40. The kid that bought the car put a battery in it, started it up and drove it onto a car trailer. He put the engine in a pickup and got another 25,000 miles out of it. If you use a quality synthetic or synthetic blend, Duralube will add nothing. But for an older car, it could keep the car on the road much longer. You do not want to use it in a car that burns oil, it will ruin the catelytic converter. I regularly drive my vehicle to well over 150,000 miles and I have always used Duralube when the car hits about 100,000. I have owned a car that has suffered any major engine damage in the 30 or so years I have been driving.
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  #8  
Old 04-12-2002, 07:28 PM
racer72 racer72 is offline
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The last line should read I have NEVER owned a car that has suffered any major engine damage.
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  #9  
Old 04-12-2002, 08:47 PM
Tedster Tedster is offline
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Any worn engine that burns oil to any appreciable extent will degrade the catalyzer.

Still, if there were miracle additives wouldn't you expect to see them utilized in aircraft? There's no snake oil when it comes to aviation products.
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  #10  
Old 04-14-2002, 02:35 PM
Gary T Gary T is offline
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Testimonials, true or not, sound great but don't prove anything. That's why they're the favored advertising method for super diet pills and other things that don't work.

The results of a carefully constructed, properly run scientific study with enough subjects to eliminate the occasional fluke experience might be helpful. Don't hold your breath waiting, though.
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  #11  
Old 04-14-2002, 02:40 PM
Gary T Gary T is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by racer72
I am not quoting any so called experts who's opinion matter more if they get paid to mention the product (such as Mr. Sikorsky)...
Do you know how stupid this sounds? First of all, Sikorsky is an expert--not a "so-called" expert--on tribology (look it up). Secondly, why would anyone pay him to thoroughly pan the product? You're not making any sense here.
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  #12  
Old 04-14-2002, 10:28 PM
Chris Luongo Chris Luongo is offline
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I have a copy of Drive It Forever, which is an excellent book. Some of Sikorsky's suggestions are very simple and practical, while others are a bit on the obsessive side, but he's certainly a smart and thoughtful guy. Also, I believe he was a car engineer too.

I agree with the others; if the stuff was so good, GM would be pouring it in at the factory, and recommending it in the owner's manual too.

One other thing not to forget. I'm almost SURE that people who use DuraLube get more life from their cars than people who don't. Wanna know why? Because the kind of guy who would be interested in a product like DuraLube, also takes great care of his car in general, which is actually what makes his car last longer. Make sense?
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  #13  
Old 04-14-2002, 10:39 PM
LolaBaby LolaBaby is offline
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I've been working on cars for over 13 years, and the best thing you can do for your car is to CHANGE THE OIL regularly. I've also worked in an auto parts store part-time and the best thing about the countless additives we've sold is the money it's made my boss.

The one additive I do add occasionally is Chevron's Techroline and it's only because of the fact that when I used to work at a GM dealership, it was a RECOMMENDED FIX by GM ENGINEERS for a fuel clogging problem they were having. I figure if the engineers themselves recommended it, it can't be that bad.

The last thing is, adding anything can't hurt (to a certain extent).
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  #14  
Old 04-15-2002, 12:18 AM
Gary T Gary T is offline
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I believe that's [i]Techron[?i], LolaBaby. It's the best in-the-tank fuel additive I've run across. It was also house-branded by some other auto manufacturers. And you're right--if the car manufacturer recommends or sells it, that's as good an endorsement as you'll ever get.

Gotta disagree with this, though: The last thing is, adding anything can't hurt (to a certain extent). Some additives do cause harm. Again, the auto manufacturers generally advise against them. It's in the owner's manuals, which no one reads.
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  #15  
Old 04-15-2002, 12:48 AM
LolaBaby LolaBaby is offline
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Sorry, yeah...Techron. That's the ONE thing I add to my cars...nothing else.

I remember old-school mechanics once, pouring transmission fluid down a carburetor and I was freaking out before they explained the carbon-blasting properties it had. I guess it worked to a certain extent. However, you can't pull stunts like that today.

And yeah...that's why I added the "to a certain extent" at the end. Sugar in a gas tank will do no one any good.
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  #16  
Old 04-15-2002, 08:56 AM
lucwarm lucwarm is offline
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Let's assume that Duralube won't make your car last longer.

Here's what I want to know:

Can you really put Duralube in, drain the radiator, drain the oil, etc., and run your car around for a while without seizing up? How long?
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  #17  
Old 04-15-2002, 01:51 PM
Gary T Gary T is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by lucwarm
Can you really put Duralube in, drain the radiator, drain the oil, etc., and run your car around for a while without seizing up?
Sure. You can also skip putting in the DuraLube and do the same thing.
Quote:
How long?
Not nearly as long as if you'd left it alone.

For the sake of argument, let's assume that if you pull the above stunt with DuraLube, the engine runs 20 minutes before going south, and if you do it without the DuraLube it runs 5 nimutes before it's toast. The question remains, so what? This isn't how engines are normally used--it's a bogus test. This is the type of thing infomercials are famous for, compelling and amazing demonstrations that have nothing to do with the true value--or lack thereof--of the product in question. If, for example, DuraLube were to ruin the crankshaft bearings over a 20,000 mile period, there would be no hint of it from doing the above.
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  #18  
Old 03-24-2013, 10:09 AM
CAPTRNSUSN CAPTRNSUSN is offline
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Bloggers, I definitely am not qualified to comment on the efficacy of Duralube, et.al. However the argument that the failure of Boeing, Airbus, Cessna, & so in to adopt the product proves a product's reliability fails to consider manufacturers complete for market share & may be regulated in what products can be used in manufacturing.

I lack any statutory reference for aircraft build requirements but consider that the recent rash of B777 failures seems to revolve around a new battery design which apparently was rushed through the FAA approval process & avoided the avoided the usual close scrutiny of USG testing requirements. I argue that if batteries require FAA approval, so too would a lubricant for a more critical aircraft component, the engine.

In regards to the argument that if Duralube proved superior to standard motor oil, GM & the rest would use it instead. Following that position to an inevitable conclusion I ask, why doesn't every vehicle roll off the manufacturing plant with synthetic oil in the pan? Cost, obviously, controls most decisions. Also, anyone who purchased & subsequent looked under the hood of new knows the batteries, shocks, tires, & other components of a car do not come from top shelf products in the industry.

Finally in re aircraft, airlines save money where they can. Consider, @ least in the past, that airlines used retreaded tires )https://bulk.resource.org/courts.gov...5.86-6047.html ) & components from a Lockheed L-1011 that crashed into the Everglades ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern...nes_Flight_401 ).

Last edited by CAPTRNSUSN; 03-24-2013 at 10:12 AM..
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  #19  
Old 03-24-2013, 03:21 PM
gotpasswords gotpasswords is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAPTRNSUSN
I lack any statutory reference for aircraft build requirements but consider that the recent rash of B777 failures seems to revolve around a new battery design...

In regards to the argument that if Duralube proved superior to standard motor oil, GM & the rest would use it instead. Following that position to an inevitable conclusion I ask, why doesn't every vehicle roll off the manufacturing plant with synthetic oil in the pan? Cost, obviously, controls most decisions.
The Boeing 787 Dreamliner is the airplane with the recent battery problems.

As for oil, since the 2011 model year, most Hondas roll off the line with a factory fill of 0W-20 synthetic, and GM cars also come with synthetic - 5W-30, I think. My 2006 Dodge pickup was born with synthetic oil in its pan, so your question appears to be moot.

ETA: Flight 401 was a failure of the crew to fly the airplane. They were distracted with a warning light and nobody was actually paying attention to keeping the airplane in the air. The plane may have had recapped tires, but the tires did not cause the warning light or the crash.

Last edited by gotpasswords; 03-24-2013 at 03:25 PM..
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  #20  
Old 03-24-2013, 03:22 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Originally Posted by Pergau View Post
Until I discovered what DuraLube is I thought this thread was going to be hot!
Ditto.
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  #21  
Old 03-24-2013, 03:38 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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When the dura is in need of lubrication, usually it is supplied by the body. But if one is not producing enough lube on one's own, DuraLube would probably not be my first choice to lubricate dura mater (tough mother). I'd probably opt for half normal saline.
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  #22  
Old 03-24-2013, 04:10 PM
GreasyJack GreasyJack is online now
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Incidentally, this thread wasn't too long after Dura Lube settled a big false advertising lawsuit with the FTC: http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2000/03/motor.shtm

I'm suprised nobody mentioned it back then.
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  #23  
Old 03-24-2013, 04:15 PM
Amateur Barbarian Amateur Barbarian is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Morgainelf View Post
Not pertinent to the DuraLube conversation, but I had to jump in. There are some great products advertised in infomercials. It can be a very cost effective means of direct advertising, and shouldn't reflect negatively on the product. There are some products that are so new/revolutionary/unusual that it is nearly impossible to demonstrate their merits in a retail situation. Direct marketing is sometimes the only way a company can ensure that a product is presented fairly.
You'll excuse me if I invoke something I learned from a co-worker many years ago. During a long reading of some smarmy company announcement, she kept pointedly holding her arm straight up over her head. When I asked her about it later, she said it meant...

"Save the watch; the shoes are gone!"
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  #24  
Old 03-24-2013, 04:18 PM
Amateur Barbarian Amateur Barbarian is online now
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Originally Posted by Gary T View Post
Sure. You can also skip putting in the DuraLube and do the same thing.
Precisely. Back when it was Slick 50 making all the claims, they'd put the goo in an engine, run it a bit to magickafy the wear surfaces, then drain all the oil out. By golly, the engine would run an hour, two or more with no oil at all. What incredible stuff!

Of course, if you choose an engine not sensitive to things like camshaft wear, it helps. But mostly, you never run the test on an un-Slicked engine... because it would run just as long without oil.
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  #25  
Old 03-24-2013, 04:19 PM
ralph124c ralph124c is offline
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Frankly, there are tons of oil additives, with no real evidence that they do any good. Why wouldn't fleet operators or state police vehicles use them? I remember that all sort of claims were made for synthetic oils-but most mechanics say that regular oil changes (with SAE certified oil) is all you need to do.
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  #26  
Old 03-24-2013, 04:42 PM
Amateur Barbarian Amateur Barbarian is online now
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The amount of mysticism and woo around oil types and additives, as you can find on any motoring forum, approaches the ravings of high-end audiophiles and other religious beliefs. The notion that such a product is so new and spectacular (oh, and suppressed by Big Oil and Big Carmakers) that it can only be sold on an infomercial is just hilarious.

If it worked, they couldn't make enough of it for the vehicle fleets of America, who will go to great lengths to reduce fuel use and reduce maintenance costs.
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  #27  
Old 04-15-2013, 08:42 PM
Wesley Clark Wesley Clark is online now
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I've never tried duralube. I have tried Lucas heavy duty oil stabilizer. My car burns about half a quart of oil a month, so I normally have to add that much each month. The manual calls for changing the oil out every 5 months.

The last time I got my oil changed I had a quart of Lucas put in with the oil, and in the last 5 months (I just had the oil changed again last weekend) the car did not lose more than half a quart over the entire 5 months.

So that product worked for me on my car burning/leaking oil.
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  #28  
Old 04-16-2013, 08:42 AM
Robb Robb is offline
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I knew I read racer72's testimonial somewhere before.
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  #29  
Old 04-16-2013, 08:59 AM
Dog80 Dog80 is offline
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I have tried a similar product named Motorkote.

My motorcycle has a very rough gear change action. I don't know if it is normal for this specific model or simply my motorcycle has some kind of defect. Whenever I add some Motorkote the gear changes become silky-smooth. Only problem is that the effect doesn't last for more than a couple of months. Whatever is in Motorkote does work but breaks down eventually.
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  #30  
Old 04-16-2013, 09:47 AM
Crafter_Man Crafter_Man is offline
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Originally Posted by ralph124c View Post
I remember that all sort of claims were made for synthetic oils-but most mechanics say that regular oil changes (with SAE certified oil) is all you need to do.
I think using synthetic oil in a water-cooled engine is a waste of money. So I just use regular 'ol oil in my automobiles. However, I do use synthetic oil in my riding mower and lawn tractor. Those engines get pretty hot, especially in the summer, and I figure synthetic oil will hold up much better in these engines compared to non-synthetic oil.
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  #31  
Old 04-16-2013, 02:38 PM
Arkcon Arkcon is offline
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Ironic how this decade old thread references Drive It Forever by Bob Sikorsky. When I read his book, it raved about the Inset Fuel Stabilizer, which is grade A hokum: http://www.skepdic.com/inset.html
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  #32  
Old 04-16-2013, 03:10 PM
Keeve Keeve is online now
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Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
When the dura is in need of lubrication, usually it is supplied by the body.
For regular humans, yeah, I suppose so. But I'm not so sure about zombies.
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  #33  
Old 04-16-2013, 03:28 PM
Saint Cad Saint Cad is offline
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I notice the reviver of this zombie, Susan, Captain in the Royal Navy, has only made that one post on this Board. What she says must be true if they are willing to take time out of their apparently busy schedule to post it.
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  #34  
Old 04-16-2013, 09:58 PM
whc.03grady whc.03grady is offline
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Originally Posted by Amateur Barbarian View Post
"Save the watch; the shoes are gone!"
???
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  #35  
Old 04-17-2013, 03:50 AM
obbn obbn is offline
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Originally Posted by LolaBaby View Post
Sorry, yeah...Techron. That's the ONE thing I add to my cars...nothing else.

I remember old-school mechanics once, pouring transmission fluid down a carburetor and I was freaking out before they explained the carbon-blasting properties it had. I guess it worked to a certain extent. However, you can't pull stunts like that today.

And yeah...that's why I added the "to a certain extent" at the end. Sugar in a gas tank will do no one any good.
The ATF (automatic transmission fluid) "trick" can and had worked wonders on rotary engines. A common problem in high mileage rotary engines is a build up of carbon on the corner apex seals. Sometimes this build up will not allow the seal to set properly, causing a loss of compression. A common fix if to pour ATF down the carb or inject it into the spark plug holes on the fuel injected models with the ignition coil disconnected. Bump the engine and let the ATF circulate, wait 24 hours, reconnect the coils and fire it up. You'll have the neighbors calling the fire department as the smoke produced out the exhaust will convince them the entire county is on fire, but there's a good chance your compression levels are now restored! It isn't unheard of to take a rotary engine from a junkyard, subject it to the ATF treatment and bring it back to life. ATF if great stuff for us rotorheads!
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  #36  
Old 05-22-2013, 11:02 AM
duralubefan duralubefan is offline
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Dura Lube

I have used dura lube for about 10 years. I have a 97 Ford Crown Vic with over 80K miles on it and it gets a solid 18 to 20 mpg. I also use Mobil 1. This product has proven itself to me over a considerable period of time. On a trip in 05 or 06 I used this product, with transmission treatment, and standard Havoline motor oil, in a 92 Ford Crown Vic and over the entire trip which totaled more than 1400 miles and the last portion included some extensive high speed driving I averaged 27.75 mpg.
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  #37  
Old 05-22-2013, 11:18 AM
california jobcase california jobcase is online now
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Sounds like a '97 Grand Marquis I had- 20 mpg city and 27 mpg at 70+mph highway, consistent over 50,000 miles, using no additives or synthetic oils whatsoever. Same numbers stated by a friend of mine over the life of two Grand Marquis (same car basically as a Crown Vic).
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  #38  
Old 05-22-2013, 02:33 PM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
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Originally Posted by duralubefan View Post
I have used dura lube for about 10 years. I have a 97 Ford Crown Vic with over 80K miles on it and it gets a solid 18 to 20 mpg. I also use Mobil 1. This product has proven itself to me over a considerable period of time. On a trip in 05 or 06 I used this product, with transmission treatment, and standard Havoline motor oil, in a 92 Ford Crown Vic and over the entire trip which totaled more than 1400 miles and the last portion included some extensive high speed driving I averaged 27.75 mpg.
I have a turbocharged Dodge Neon with 163,000 miles. It doesn't use oil between changes and I've only ever put in conventional 10W-30 in it. In a modern engine, you don't need any dodgy additives. In fact, I would say in a modern engine you absolutely don't want to dump any additives in there. The engine was designed for and validated with the grade of oil the manufacturer tells you to use. Motor oil is an engineered fluid with rather stringent standards. You don't need anything else inside your engine.
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  #39  
Old 05-22-2013, 09:51 PM
california jobcase california jobcase is online now
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Oh- the 50k miles I put on the car I mentioned was from 123,000 to 173,000 miles.
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  #40  
Old 05-22-2013, 10:14 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is online now
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I take one drop of Duralube and stir it into a 55 gallon drum of motor oil. I take 1 drop from that drum and stir it into 1 quart of oil. I take one drop of that and stir it into each quart of oil I put in the car. It's very effective because even though there may not be any Duralube in the oil I add to the car the oil has an enduring memory of the Duralube and is just as effective.
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  #41  
Old 05-23-2013, 07:56 AM
Saint Cad Saint Cad is offline
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My understanding is that in the mid-1980's, motor oil engineering took a huge step forward and so a lot of the old remedies like Rislone or thicker oil as the car got older that may have made sense in the past no longer applied. That being said, I think Duralube and Slick50 simply thickened the oil.
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  #42  
Old 05-23-2013, 09:42 AM
chargerrich chargerrich is offline
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Dura Lube paid 2 million in a consumer lawsuit to settle charges of deceptive and misleading ads.

Anyone that would buy this product, deserves to lose their money.

Edit - An even better link to the FTC HERE

Last edited by chargerrich; 05-23-2013 at 09:44 AM..
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  #43  
Old 05-23-2013, 09:56 AM
Valgard Valgard is offline
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Originally Posted by TriPolar View Post
I take one drop of Duralube and stir it into a 55 gallon drum of motor oil. I take 1 drop from that drum and stir it into 1 quart of oil. I take one drop of that and stir it into each quart of oil I put in the car. It's very effective because even though there may not be any Duralube in the oil I add to the car the oil has an enduring memory of the Duralube and is just as effective.
It's Hoilistic!
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  #44  
Old 05-23-2013, 10:19 AM
johnpost johnpost is online now
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Originally Posted by TriPolar View Post
I take one drop of Duralube and stir it into a 55 gallon drum of motor oil. I take 1 drop from that drum and stir it into 1 quart of oil. I take one drop of that and stir it into each quart of oil I put in the car. It's very effective because even though there may not be any Duralube in the oil I add to the car the oil has an enduring memory of the Duralube and is just as effective.
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It's Hoilistic!
that's oilistic.
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  #45  
Old 05-23-2013, 12:04 PM
Raza Raza is offline
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I thought it was oileopathic.
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  #46  
Old 05-23-2013, 01:28 PM
Saint Cad Saint Cad is offline
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I thought it was oileopathic.
More like oileopathetic
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  #47  
Old 08-05-2014, 03:55 PM
draston draston is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2014
dura lube works

I use their engine treatment and it saved me. My engine burns oil, I just checked my dip stick and found not even a drop on the dip stick. I put in 2 quarts of oil. [I am grateful not stupid] My car has been running fine for a 200 Hyundai with over 150k miles on it with Dura lube in it. . A friend of mine who had a car that would shudder due to losing oil after a certain amount of time put Dura lube in it after we saw the commercial back in the 90s and wow did it work and this was in Phoenix. After quite some time with no shudder for weeks we decided to check the oil level , to our surprise there was only one drop on the dip stick. I am sold . I highly recommend using Dura lube to anyone ! Very happy ; David Aston of Magna , Utah
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  #48  
Old 08-05-2014, 07:17 PM
Sicks Ate Sicks Ate is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: KS, US
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Aw dammit, I clicked on this because I thought it was another sex thread.
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  #49  
Old 08-05-2014, 09:16 PM
Isilder Isilder is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2013
Automotive engineers actually do chemical tests on oils to measure the rate of wear - they can measure concentration of metal in the oil ! From this they can know the source of the metal as the rings, valves, bore ,head are made of different metals.. and they know how much wear occurs.. the wear rate ..

If Duralube or other oil or oil additive was better for longevity , the engine manufacturer would specify it for their engine !
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