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  #1  
Old 05-06-2002, 02:36 PM
Honesty Honesty is offline
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Does meat really stay in your body for 7 days?

I've spoken to a few vegetarians and vegans and they often say the reason they are is because meat stays in the body forever. Seeing how the body has enzymes to break down fats and proteins, how can this be?

While I am at it. Is it also true that Humans are the only animals who get painfully sick if they consume uncooked meat? A vegetarian told me this as proof that Humans are made to herbivores.

Thanks for reading,

Brian
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  #2  
Old 05-06-2002, 02:44 PM
OfBlinkingThings OfBlinkingThings is offline
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yes sir

Well brian, lets just say you get you moneys worth when you buy a steak. Meat can stay in your colon for up to 6 months in some cases, turning a wonderful black color and giving you bad breath. Its not that veggies just shoot through you, but they are not as hard to process as, lets say, a pickled pigs foot. May I suggest a colonic and Yves veggie burger my friend?

See you in line at the Sizzler
OfBlinkingThings
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Old 05-06-2002, 02:46 PM
OfBlinkingThings OfBlinkingThings is offline
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Well brian, lets just say you get you moneys worth when you buy a steak. Meat can stay in your colon for up to 6 months in some cases, turning a wonderful black color and giving you bad breath. Its not that veggies just shoot through you, but they are not as hard to process as, lets say, a pickled pigs foot. May I suggest a colonic and Yves veggie burger my friend?

See you in line at the Sizzler
OfBlinkingThings
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  #4  
Old 05-06-2002, 03:00 PM
DPWhite DPWhite is offline
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Cites?

Without cites, it's vegetarians who are full of crap.

Eat animals, don't love them.
Sneaking up on a plant and eating it is not sporting.
Plants are living things and have rights too.
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  #5  
Old 05-06-2002, 03:23 PM
DPWhite DPWhite is offline
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I apologize. That was too sarcastic for General Questions.
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  #6  
Old 05-06-2002, 03:26 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
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Re: Does meat really stay in your body for 7 days?

Quote:
Originally posted by Honesty
I've spoken to a few vegetarians and vegans and they often say the reason they are is because meat stays in the body forever. Seeing how the body has enzymes to break down fats and proteins, how can this be?
Your skepticism is well founded. The idea that meat somehow "stays in the body forever" is is complete nonsense. Meat - which lacks indigestible cellulose - is much easier to break down and digest than vegetable matter.

Quote:
While I am at it. Is it also true that Humans are the only animals who get painfully sick if they consume uncooked meat? A vegetarian told me this as proof that Humans are made to herbivores.
What makes you think humans typically get painfully sick from eating uncooked meat? I don't. Inuits don't. Many people like their steak rare, and steak tartare is also a popular dish.

And of course Cecil has discussed whether
Are humans meat eaters or vegetarians by nature.
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  #7  
Old 05-06-2002, 03:30 PM
AndrewL AndrewL is offline
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Nonsense. Even totally indigestible matter (IE, a marble or chewing gum) doesn't take more than a few days to pass through your body. Your digestive system doesn't hold on to stuff until it's done, it pushes everything through at about the smae rate. And meat digests more easily and quickly than plant matter.
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Old 05-06-2002, 03:43 PM
Darwin's Finch Darwin's Finch is offline
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Re: yes sir

Quote:
Originally posted by OfBlinkingThings
Well brian, lets just say you get you moneys worth when you buy a steak. Meat can stay in your colon for up to 6 months in some cases, turning a wonderful black color and giving you bad breath. Its not that veggies just shoot through you, but they are not as hard to process as, lets say, a pickled pigs foot. May I suggest a colonic and Yves veggie burger my friend?
And here's where a little rational thought can go a long way. See, if meat stays in the colon for up to six months, then so will everything behind it. And a six-month long bout of constipation is unheard of (at least by me).

Then, of course, there are all these sphincters throughout the digestive tract which prevent back-flow of materials. Unless you've got major problems (which are completely independent of your diet), intestinal gas travels in one direction. So the whole bad breath bit is silly as well. Bad breath is caused by not brushing your teeth, or illness, not by eating meat or getting constipated.

And here's what Cecil says about colonics.
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  #9  
Old 05-06-2002, 03:56 PM
scotth scotth is offline
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.
Quote:
meat stays in the body forever.
I guess you could say that at least some of everything you eat stays in your body effectively forever. For example, if you eat something containing calcium, it is quite possible that at least some tiny amount of that calcium would be integrated into your bones and stay there for life. It is reasonable that at least some of the individual atoms that make up a body at birth will still be in it at its death. Probably not a high percentage. But, with the countless number of atoms in your body at birth, it is a reasonable idea. What any of that has to do with you should eat is beyond me.

Quote:
Is it also true that Humans are the only animals who get painfully sick if they consume uncooked meat? A vegetarian told me this as proof that Humans are made to herbivores.
I have eaten uncooked meat on many occasions. I never got painfully sick from it. The reason you get sick from some uncooked meat is that is may contain micro organisms that aren't good for you. Cooking the meat kills them and makes potentially unsafe meat, safe. If the meat doesn't have dangerous level of micro organisms in it raw, it won't hurt you a bit to eat it that way.

We are not made to be herbivores. Strict vegetarians have to work pretty hard to escape dietary deficiencies. They frequently fail.

Do we (in the industrialize world) eat more meat than is required (or even desired) for good health? Most likely. Removing all of it is not the answer, though.

It seems the problem of today is that we are getting too good at growing food. The amount of physical labor that most people are required to do is minimal and food is abundant beyond the immaginations of people a couple hundred years ago. These, combined with a lack of self discipline is the problem.

Going vegetarian puts a barrier back up to overeating. It is much harder to be overnurished on such a diet. This may be a good thing for some (maybe alot) of people. That doesn't mean we are built to be vegetarians.

World class athletes are very rarely strict vegetarians. This is a group of people that examine what they eat carefully. What is even better about this group is that they have a very useful measuring stick for the efficacy of a diet, namely their measured performance. If we were built to be vegans, it would stand to reason that the best performance would be on such a diet
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  #10  
Old 05-06-2002, 05:53 PM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
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I thought all food stays in your body for a lot longer than seven days. Or, at least, a portion of it does. If it didn't, you'd just waste away.
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  #11  
Old 05-06-2002, 06:21 PM
Darwin's Finch Darwin's Finch is offline
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I think the intended argument is more along the lines of "meat stays in your colon for [insert ridiculous amount of time here]"
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  #12  
Old 05-06-2002, 07:51 PM
kanicbird kanicbird is offline
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Cite please

and btw I have eaten raw meat (mainly beef) many times (including complete meals) and never got sick from it.
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  #13  
Old 05-07-2002, 12:05 AM
stockton stockton is offline
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I had a chicken tandoori on Friday that stayed in my system for about 2 hours.

...yes, I am sure. TMI.

Everything you eat passes through in its own turn, just like you in the gift shop at the amusement park. You can't hang around Graceland forever, the crowd behind you will force you out. Just like yesterday's burger. Mmmm, yesterday's burger..
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  #14  
Old 05-07-2002, 12:37 AM
Lure Lure is offline
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On the raw meat thing,I've eaten raw clams and oysters many times,not only didn't I get sick,out of a doz. usually only 2 or 3 work (if I'm lucky enough)
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  #15  
Old 05-07-2002, 12:55 AM
Omnivore Omnivore is offline
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Knowing people in the medical field, I can say with authority that nothing packs itself into the colon for more than a few days if you eat a normal diet of meat and veggies. The veggies act like a broom and sweep out the intestines with all of their fiber. You can have diverticuli (little pouches in the intestine, like a weak spot in an inner tube that expands outward) that may capture and hold things over long, but a good diet even sweeps them out. If not, then they cause pain and you go for treatment.

I am always amazed at the 'eternal meat' thing that so called professionals come up with when they should know better or at least crack open a first year medical or nursing book that explains the digestive system to you. That's like homeopathic medicines: dilute something into oblivion then place a drop of the water on an inert pill so the 'ghost' of the medication can magically fight a disease. None of the original substance is even in the water drop!
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  #16  
Old 05-07-2002, 02:38 AM
sailor sailor is offline
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I have eaten raw meat many times. I'd get home with some ground beef and just eat it. I never got sick . . . But it is much safer to cook the meat just like it is safer to cook the vegetables. There have been a few cases of people dying when they got E Coli from eating undercooked meat. So better cook it but note you can get E Coli from vegetables too.
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  #17  
Old 05-07-2002, 03:12 AM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is offline
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The argument about humans being the only creatures that get sick from eating raw meat falls apart when you consider that predator animals typically eat their meat fresh, in the heart-still-beating sense of the word. Carrion eaters have adapted to a diet of less-than-fresh, but they're pretty far removed from humans on the evolutionary spectrum.

The next time a vegatarian starts bugging you about your diet, try telling him/her about that last nature show you saw where the lioness clamped her jaws on the throat of the water buffalo and squeezed for long slow minutes while the blood spilled over her razor-sharp fangs...

Ah, nature. Gotta love it.
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  #18  
Old 05-07-2002, 04:56 AM
sailor sailor is offline
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And who said animals don't get sick from what they eat? All animals, whether they eat meat or vegeatbles, get sick from their food. Some people have this idealised view of nature where everything works fine and in balance. Animals get sick and die from their food all the time.
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Old 05-07-2002, 05:27 AM
levdrakon levdrakon is online now
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I'm blessed (cursed?) with a very quick colon. What I eat today comes out tomorrow. I used to believe my vegetarian friends when they told me I had pounds of undigested meat in my gut, but I no longer believe that. I guess it's an unwanted aspect of aging, but I'm pretty in touch with my colon, and I can guarentee you there're no lingering deposits of meat in there.

And I loves me some good steak.
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  #20  
Old 05-07-2002, 05:31 AM
Shalmanese Shalmanese is offline
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Food isn't neccesarily stuck in the colon per se but you do get stories of Bezoar stones (balls of hair) and other strange objects lodged within the Digestive tract (usually the stomach) for many years and are usually only found upon death.

Also, I have heard the argument that Humans could never evolutionarily been vegetarians since your tooth enamel would wear away far too quickly from eating unwashed and uncooked vegtables. It is assumed that since we learned to wash and cook vegtables, our teeth haven't changed that much.
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  #21  
Old 05-07-2002, 06:09 AM
LorieSmurf LorieSmurf is offline
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Guys, please don't think that because one vegetarian told the OP this, that all vegetarians think the same way. I feel like the replies are leaning that way. I certainly don't believe that, and I betcha a lot of vegetarians on this board don't believe that. I don't think that eating meat is bad for a person, I just don't want to eat it for myself (it's a personal ethical thing). I believe that since I'm a human being with freedom to choose, I can either choose to be omnivore, carnivore, or herbivore. Um...or ovo-lacto vegetarian (whichever category that fits into...LOL) . And if you're making good food choices (getting all the calories, protein, carbs, and fats you need), then eat what you want to eat.

Lorie
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  #22  
Old 05-07-2002, 09:13 AM
hawthorne hawthorne is offline
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A hilarious and frank Guardian article on the matter (the topic of a recent Fathom thread). Something's in there.
Quote:
The enema within
When photographer Anthony Cullen heard the clank of glass on porcelain, he didn't need to examine the contents of the toilet bowl between his legs. He instinctively knew he had just passed the marble he had swallowed as a five-year-old; the small coloured sphere - "I think it was a bluey" - had lodged in his colon for 22 years. His nonchalance was understandable. Having flushed 400 pints of coffee and vinegar solution around his large intestine through 10 enemas, and taken 100 herbal laxatives, he had become hardened to extraordinary sights. He had already excreted yards of long stringy mucus "with a strange yellow glaze", several hard black pellets and numerous pieces of undigested rump steak. Like an iceberg breaking away from a glacier, the marble was simply the latest object to drop off the furred up wall of his colon.
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  #23  
Old 05-07-2002, 09:27 AM
El Zagna El Zagna is offline
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OK, according to my New Age source, the meat doesn't just sit in the colon but rather attaches itself to the lining of the colon walls as a "mucoid plaque". Personally, I think it's all BS, but at least that would explain how other stuff would pass through the colon while the meat remained.
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  #24  
Old 05-07-2002, 10:47 AM
Floater Floater is offline
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And according to a friend who had found it at some other New Age site, that's into intestinal cleansing, (unfortunately the site is only in Swedish) it takes around 24 hours for a meal to pass your body.
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  #25  
Old 05-07-2002, 10:52 AM
Captain Amazing Captain Amazing is offline
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Well, the problem is that there isn't evidence that "mucoid plaque" exists.

Mucoid plaque is a pet theory of Dr. Richard Anderson. Anderson is a professor of natural medicine in Arizona(I think it's Arizona). Anderson believes that when a person ingests toxins, they form a "mucoid plaque" in the large intestine, which contributes to disease. He therefore reccomends things like high colonics, to cleanse the mucoid plaque.
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  #26  
Old 07-05-2002, 10:32 AM
The Mermaid The Mermaid is offline
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Bullshit.

On an almost daily basis, I see pics of the lining of the bowels. It's called colonoscopy. I have even gazed upon the wonder that is my own colon. I was unimpressed. Not a trace of the prime rib I had the week before or even the pork chop I had the day after that.

Unless you suffer from severe obstipation or possibly diverticuli, nothing is still in your colon a week after you eat it.
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  #27  
Old 07-05-2002, 11:44 AM
Exapno Mapcase Exapno Mapcase is offline
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From Merriwether Lewis' journals:

Quote:
...each [Indian] had a peice of some discription and all eating most ravenously. Some were eating the kidnies the melt [spleen] and liver and the blood running from the corners of their mouths, other were in a similar situation with thte paunch and guts. ... one of the last [to arrive] had provided himself with about nine feet of the small guts one end of which he was chewing on while with his hands he was squezzing the contents out at the other.
excerpted from Stephen E. Ambrose, Undaunted Courage. [Just read this page today, so I had to share.]

These Indians, who had been living on berries, were undoubtedly not unique. Stories of the frontier, of explorers, and of people who just wind up lost and starving will have untold numbers of incidents in which people eat raw meat.

If you go back far enough in human history you will find a time before fire, in which all meat eaten was raw. It's not likely that all of our more recent ancestors had fire on hand at all times for their convenience, either. It is as much a certainty as we can know about history that human digestive systems evolved to handle raw meat as a normal diet of the diet.

I've written books in which digestion played a large role, so I've done a fair amount of research into the subject. The above posters are of course correct in debunking the OP's vegan friends. I am constitutionally against proselytizing of all kinds, because it almost always leads to people telling outrageous lies (conscious or not) as part of the process. There are many vegans who live lives of conviction without inflicting falsehoods on others, but, as always, the few tarnish the many.
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  #28  
Old 07-05-2002, 01:11 PM
Gozu Tashoya Gozu Tashoya is offline
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"I'm not a vegetarian because I love animals. I'm a vegetarian because I hate plants."
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  #29  
Old 07-05-2002, 02:23 PM
Epimetheus Epimetheus is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by scotth
.
I guess you could say that at least some of everything you eat stays in your body effectively forever. For example, if you eat something containing calcium, it is quite possible that at least some tiny amount of that calcium would be integrated into your bones and stay there for life. It is reasonable that at least some of the individual atoms that make up a body at birth will still be in it at its death. Probably not a high percentage. But, with the countless number of atoms in your body at birth, it is a reasonable idea. What any of that has to do with you should eat is beyond me.

Just a small nitpick. While nutrients in your body may last awhile, your body replaces the cells, bones everything every so often.
From: http://www.cybermacro.com/articles31.html


Quote:
Every part of our body will replace itself, some parts faster than others. For example, approximately every 10 years, your entire skeleton has replaced itself. Contrast this rate to the replacement rate of the lining of the stomach. Because of the hostile environment contained by the stomach lining, it will replace itself approximately once every three hours. To illustrate the process of continual replacement of tissue, just think about your hair. It grows, and it is cut and trimmed, and it continues to grow
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  #30  
Old 07-05-2002, 08:02 PM
stockton stockton is offline
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KKBattousai, you are my new hero.
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  #31  
Old 07-05-2002, 09:25 PM
violet9 violet9 is offline
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Just for the record = fire was discovered and used by hominids about 100,000 years ago by homo erectus - that gives plenty of evolutionary time to develop a constitutional preference for cooked food. If we were "bloody raw carnivores" it seems to me, we would have developed larger canine teeth for tearing. Neanderthals had much broader surfaces, a different cusp shape and heavier enamel on their teeth for grinding tough, raw foods.
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Old 07-05-2002, 09:33 PM
violet9 violet9 is offline
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Just for the record = fire was discovered and used by hominids about 100,000 years ago by homo erectus - that gives plenty of evolutionary time to develop a constitutional preference for cooked food. If we were "bloody raw carnivores" it seems to me, we would have developed larger canine teeth for tearing. Neanderthals had much broader surfaces, a different cusp shape and heavier enamel on their teeth for grinding tough, raw foods. Our teeth are delicate little things by comparison.

I appreciate SuperLorie's comments - we are perhaps the only animal that can consciously choose our diet - that's a great thing. I'm not a vegetarian, but I do think there are a lot of ethical and socio-ecological reasons why eating less meat is a very good thing. I was reading Fanny Trollope's "Domestic Manners of the Americans" written in 1828 and she marveled that "even the poorest among the Americans eat meat three times a day." That in a time when most Europeans saw meat on the table once a week or less. We have always been richly blessed in this country, and I think that this historical legacy encourages many Americans to be vaguely suspicious of vegetarians and like types - as if they are somehow unpatriotic.
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  #33  
Old 07-05-2002, 10:09 PM
Exapno Mapcase Exapno Mapcase is offline
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Humans are omnivores, not carnivores. Both our teeth and our digestive systems have evolved to fit.

Didn't Cecil have a column on this?

Ah, here it is.
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  #34  
Old 07-05-2002, 10:39 PM
David Simmons David Simmons is offline
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Re: Re: Does meat really stay in your body for 7 days?

Quote:
Originally posted by Colibri


Your skepticism is well founded. The idea that meat somehow "stays in the body forever" is is complete nonsense. Meat - which lacks indigestible cellulose - is much easier to break down and digest than vegetable matter.

Just to dot the "i's" and cross the "t's" on Colibri's post here is what the Britannica says about cellulose: "The basic structural component of plant cell walls, cellulose comprises about 33 percent of all vegetable matter (90 percent of cotton and 50 percent of wood are cellulose) and is the most abundant of all naturally occurring organic compounds. Nondigestible by man,[bold face added] cellulose is a food for herbivorous animals (e.g., cows, horses) because they retain it long enough for digestion by microorganisms present in the alimentary tract; protozoans in the gut of insects such as termites also digest cellulose."

It is also well to remember that the ruminants have an extra digestion compartment, the rumen, where the cellulose is held for a period to be partially digested and then brought up, chewed again to further break it down and then reswallowed. That cellulose is really, really tough stuff. The cell walls of trees are of cellulose and they manage to support trees over 300 ft. high in high winds.

Isaac Asimov points out in one essay that strictly vegetarian animals have one type of bile salts that help break down vegetable matter, strict carnivores have a different type of bile salts for handling flesh, and man has both kinds. This indicates that people are biologically omnivorous.
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  #35  
Old 07-06-2002, 05:24 AM
ratty ratty is offline
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Just another vegan checking to say that all vegans/vegetarians don't think these things: meat staying in your body for some ridiculous time period is patent nonsense.

But I would like to add some other "getting sick from food" info: You can get sick from eating raw vegetables. And not just from the natural poisons contained in sprouting potatos, raw beans, or certain mushrooms. Vegetables can also carry pathogens they pick up from the soil, from the groundwater, or even from the air. Overuse of pesticides can also make some people sick. Meat and dairy products seem more likely to carry microbial pathogens and other assorted gastrointestinal nasties such as protozoans and helminths, but vegetables are suspect as well. The important thing is food safety: good washing techniques, thorough cooking, and making sure you are not contaminating whatever food you are preparing with dirty hands, dirty utensils, or dirty kitchen surfaces. (Cutting boards are apparently a big source of microbial life.)
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