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  #1  
Old 05-15-2002, 04:30 PM
Lorenzo Lorenzo is offline
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Best 70's Rock Drummers?

Phil Ehart (Kansas) and Neil Peart (RUSH) for the same reasons:

Very quick, excellent soloists, interesting styles, awesome live and difficult to imitate

Durability: still recording 25 years after, still in great shape at age 50+, still with the same band 25 years after
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  #2  
Old 05-15-2002, 04:41 PM
buckyogi buckyogi is offline
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John Bonham, Led Zeppelin.
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  #3  
Old 05-15-2002, 04:44 PM
obidiah obidiah is offline
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Bill Bruford. I'll second Neil Peart.
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  #4  
Old 05-15-2002, 04:52 PM
astorian astorian is online now
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As usual, a lot depends on what you mean by "best" drummers.

When people are rating the "best" guitarists, they tend to pick guys who do lightning-fast, flashy solos. But while the Eddie Van Halens of the world are impressive, they tend to repeat themselves far too much. I'm generally more impressed by guys like David Gilmour and Mark Knopfler, who may not have Eddie van Halen's dexterity, but who have a real feel for what a song needs.

If you're rating drummers by their ability to play flashy solos, there's no question who the best is: Carl Palmer. 90% of the time, I get utterly bored by drum solos. They're usually my cue to go get a hot dog, or make a trip to the men's room. Neil Peart and Carl Palmer are the only drummers who've ever held my attention during lengthy drum solos. And, good as Peart was, Palmer was MUCH better.

That said, soloing is only a small part of what makes a good drummer. John Bonham was a pathetic drum soloist, but his drum work defined the Led Zeppelin sound- Buddy Rich couldn't have played "Dazed and Confused" or "Whole Lotta Love" any better.

Then there's the question, how much value do you place on versatility? Bill Bruford and Phil Collins come to mind as drummers who excelled in several different genres. Though they're best known for their work in "art rock" (Bruford in Yes and King Crimson, Collins in Genesis), both did some fine work in jazz fusion as well (Bruford in his own band, featuring Allan Holdsworth, and Collins with Brand X).

Then, of course, there's the all-time great studio session drummer, Hal Blaine. People are often astonished at how many of their favorite records of the 60s and 70s actually featured Blaine on the drums (in the mid 60s, whether you were listening to Frank Sinatra or Frank Zappa, you were hearing Hal Blaine).

So, my short list is (in alphabetical order):

Hal Blaine
John Bonham
Bill Bruford
Phil Collins
Carl Palmer
Neil Peart

But I retain great admiration and affection for numerous other drummers, including Terry Bozzio and Ian Paice.
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  #5  
Old 05-15-2002, 05:07 PM
JThunder JThunder is offline
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Well, Jay Osmond was ranked among the USA's top drummers in his time. One might not consider him a "rock" drummer, but the Osmonds did perform their share of rock tunes back then.
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  #6  
Old 05-15-2002, 05:29 PM
madcat madcat is offline
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"Durability: still recording 25 years after, still in great shape at age 50+, still with the same band 25 years after"

I sincerely thought this was a gag posting when I read it.

Then I thought:
I always wondered: "Exactly who ARE these people who call the Stones "THE GREATEST ROCK AND ROLL BAND OF ALL TIME"?/

Durability ! That explains it!
I]Durability???[/I]

Totally invalid stat.
For multiple reasons. On so many levels.
Especially for drummers.
Think about it.

Phil Ehart (Kansas) and Neil Peart (RUSH)
Still with the same band 25 years after"
Totally invalid stat.
For multiple reasons.
On so many levels.
Especially for drummers.
Think about it.

I]Durability???[/I]
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  #7  
Old 05-15-2002, 05:33 PM
madcat madcat is offline
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"Durability: still recording 25 years after, still in great shape at age 50+, still with the same band 25 years after"

Totally invalid stat.
For multiple reasons. On so many levels.
Especially for drummers.
Think about it.

I sincerely thought this was a gag posting when I read it.

Then I thought:
I always wondered: "Exactly who ARE these people who call the Stones "THE GREATEST ROCK AND ROLL BAND OF ALL TIME"?/

Durability ! That explains it!

I]Durability???[/I]
Phil Ehart (Kansas) and Neil Peart (RUSH)
Still with the same band 25 years after"
Totally invalid stat.
For multiple reasons.
On so many levels.
Especially for drummers.
Think about it.

I]Durability???[/I]
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  #8  
Old 05-15-2002, 06:08 PM
Odieman Odieman is offline
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I know I might get pilloried for this but Max Weinberg is one damn fine drummer, and anybody who survived the seventies know that drum solos are a) overated and b) boring as hell to sit through.

God help me favorite drummers from the late seventies, early eighties are Gina Shock of the Go Go's, Chris Frantz of the Talking Heads and Pete Thomas of the Attractions :hangs head in shame and retreats from this thread:
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  #9  
Old 05-16-2002, 01:53 AM
Smapti Smapti is online now
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Eight posts and not one mention of Keith Moon?
Phillistines. :P
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  #10  
Old 05-16-2002, 02:00 AM
Big Kahuna Burger Big Kahuna Burger is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Smapti
Eight posts and not one mention of Keith Moon?
Phillistines. :P
Yeah, I was wondering what took so long.
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  #11  
Old 05-16-2002, 07:14 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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My list? Bonham, Collins and Stewart Copeland. How can y'all forget Stewart Copeland?

Unfortunately, Neal Peart has never done it for me. For that matter, neither have Rush in general. It's just that Peart reminds me of the drumming equivalent of Yngwie Malmsteen. He almost sounds like a computer behind a drum set.

Bonham and Copeland in particular sound far more "organic" with the music, if that makes any sense. Bonham has a tendency to pull the beat (ie. play behind it) and Copeland pushes it, never mind the tasty wild syncopations. It's something a bit intangible, something akin to "soul" in music. Pearts drumming is a bit inhuman for my tastes.
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  #12  
Old 05-16-2002, 07:19 AM
pezpunk pezpunk is offline
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what? No mention of Carmen Appice? Actually not my favorite but I learned to play from his instructional book
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  #13  
Old 05-16-2002, 08:46 AM
Jerrybear Jerrybear is offline
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Mickey Hart of the Grateful Dead, of course! The best drummer of his or any other time. He has written several books on the history of drums and drumming, and his work both with the Dead and other bands is most excellent.
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  #14  
Old 05-16-2002, 11:54 AM
Jman Jman is offline
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So where would you all rate Joe Vitale? He's kind of a journeyman, playing with lots of people, but concentrating on CSN(Y) and had a stint with the Eagles.
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  #15  
Old 05-16-2002, 01:44 PM
Sphinx Sphinx is offline
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Back in the late 70's I used to go skiing almost every weekend. It was a 2 hour trip from the mountain to my house, and after a long, hard day skiing I was so tired that it was a real struggle to stay awake and alert enough to negotiate those steep, slippery mountain roads. Thank God for Rush's All The World's A Stage album. Neal Peart's drum solo on Working Man was awesome! I never had any trouble staying awake while THAT was playing!

While I'm at it, how about Def Leppard's Rick Allen. You've gotta give the guy a lot of credit for having the guts to come back and play for one of the biggest bands of the era, and record one of the biggest albums in history (Hysteria) after losing his ARM!
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  #16  
Old 05-16-2002, 03:14 PM
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Then, of course, there's the all-time great studio session drummer, Hal Blaine. People are often astonished at how many of their favorite records of the 60s and 70s actually featured Blaine on the drums (in the mid 60s, whether you were listening to Frank Sinatra or Frank Zappa, you were hearing Hal Blaine).
I can see how lots of popular acts from the '60s might feature session musicians, but why Frank Zappa? Zappa was notorious for being a perfectionist in auditioning musicians for his band, and, judging from the Mothers' ethos of being the "ugliest rock band," it's not like they needed to hire band members for looks or charisma rather than musicianship. So does anyone have a cite for this?
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  #17  
Old 05-16-2002, 03:37 PM
LolaBaby LolaBaby is offline
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Keith Moon, Neil Peart, John Bonham
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  #18  
Old 05-16-2002, 04:40 PM
Hugh Jass Hugh Jass is offline
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Mick Fleetwood. Perfect pop drummer. Excellent progressive rock drummer. He could handle multiple styles with equal aplomb.
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  #19  
Old 05-16-2002, 07:06 PM
CBEscapee CBEscapee is offline
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Clive Bunker, of Jethro Tull, was considered one of the best by his peers. He was the best I ever saw and that includes Moon and Bonham. He may not be as well known because he left Tull in 1971 after their 4th album.
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  #20  
Old 05-16-2002, 07:37 PM
Jonathan Chance Jonathan Chance is online now
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Neil Peart, no doubt about it. No one even comes close. Both in keeping a rhythm, inventing a complex rhythm, or using it as a lead.

While I like Moon (but not really Bonham or Palmer) for his enthusiasm and energy I've never really viewed him as more than a rhythm-keeper. He never seems to contribute to the songwriting.

Then again, I always really dug Roger Taylor, too.
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  #21  
Old 05-16-2002, 09:15 PM
Mr. Blue Sky Mr. Blue Sky is offline
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I always liked Clem Burke (Blondie in the 70's, Eurythmics in the 80's, and Blondie again in the 90's).
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  #22  
Old 05-16-2002, 09:19 PM
Sam Stone Sam Stone is offline
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The thing about Peart is that he plays his drums very 'tonally'. He plays appropriate notes throughout the song by hitting the right piece of his kit right. He plays bells, all kinds of stuff. Very difficult to do well while still doing all the other drummerly things.

I'd rate him as the best drummer around today. Whether he was the best in the 70's is another question. He was a lot younger, had not matured fully into the drummer he became by the time 'moving pictures' came out, and there was a lot of competition from the other great drummers mentioned in this thread.
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  #23  
Old 05-16-2002, 09:30 PM
Mudshark Mudshark is offline
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Terry Bozzo. He played drums in Zappa's band from 1975 to 1978. He coilf sing and play drums at the same time, not many drummers can do that.
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  #24  
Old 05-16-2002, 10:09 PM
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It's funny how often in threads like this - "Who's the best ...." you can join in late and find the most glaring omissions.

Steve Smith of Journey, a band I never particularly liked, was and still is a fantastic drummer. Modern Drummer Magazine voted him #1 All Round Drummer 5 years in a row.
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  #25  
Old 05-16-2002, 11:08 PM
sleestak sleestak is online now
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Tommy Aldridge(SP?) and Peart hit my list. Aldridge is way under rated. Terry Bozzo(I thought it was Bozzio) is another great drummer. Phil Collins should also be there though I hate what he did in later years.

Slee
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  #26  
Old 05-17-2002, 12:01 AM
black rabbit black rabbit is offline
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1) Jerry "I can play the SHIT outta that song!" Nolan, RIP.
2) Scotty Asheton, in Sonic's Rendezvous Band, not so much the stooges.
3) Buddy Miles.
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  #27  
Old 05-17-2002, 12:30 AM
chief chief is offline
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Bonzo .. you just cant beat Moby Dick!
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  #28  
Old 05-17-2002, 09:19 AM
mack mack is offline
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In no particular order:

Phil Collins
Phil Ehart
Bill Kreutzmann
Mickey Hart
Steve Gadd
Richie Hayward
Terry Bozzio
Vinnie Colaiuta
Chester Thompson
Bill Bruford
Keith Moon
Bernard Purdie
Niel Peart
John Bonham
Danny Seraphine
John Guerin
Narada Michael Walden
Ian Paice
Alan White
Carl Palmer
Chuck Burgi
Cozy Powell
Graham Lear
Clive Bunker
Barriemore Barlow
Billy Cobham
Ainsley Dunbar
Carmine Appice
Ralph Humphrey
Lenny White
Peter Erskine
Alphonse Mouzon
Omar Hakim
James Bradley, Jr.
Stewart Copeland
Tony Williams
Jack De Johnette
Zakir Hussein....

....to name a few.

Definitely a golden age of drumming!!
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  #29  
Old 05-17-2002, 10:29 AM
Rubicon Rubicon is offline
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I love that there was (is?) a journal called "Modern Drummer". Good to see that niche stuff was available well before the Internet.

I have to vote for Bonham, and give Peart the best of the 80s. Without Bonham, Zep would not have been nearly as good--somebody had to bring some masculinity to the music and the image.
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  #30  
Old 05-17-2002, 09:22 PM
Cholo Cholo is offline
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Who said Keith Moon didn't contribute to the songwriting?

Put on "The Real Me" and tell me Keith didn't add something. There is NO other drummer in the world who could do what he brought to the table. None.

Same for "Won't Get Fooled Again". Outstanding Moon performance. His antics COMPLETELY overshadowed his talent.
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  #31  
Old 05-17-2002, 11:28 PM
tetsusaru tetsusaru is offline
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Maureen Tucker, from the Velvet Underground.
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  #32  
Old 05-17-2002, 11:31 PM
tetsusaru tetsusaru is offline
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Oh, and anyone who drummed for Spinal Tap: "It was one of those things the police said was, y`know, best left unsolved." My favourite line from that movie.
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  #33  
Old 05-18-2002, 11:44 AM
musicguy musicguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Rubicon
I love that there was (is?) a journal called "Modern Drummer". Good to see that niche stuff was available well before the Internet.
"Modern Drummer" is very much alive and well. An outstanding publication.

My vote would be for Bonham as well. Such a strong groove and a right foot to die for

Steve Smith is an incredible player, although his forte really is Jazz. Calling him one of the greatest rock drummers might be a bit of a stretch.

Personally, Palmer an Peart never did a damn thing for me. Yeah, they both have great chops, but I just don't ever feel a gread deal from what they play. Too mechanical for my tastes.
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  #34  
Old 05-19-2002, 02:09 AM
Mudshark Mudshark is offline
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Yeah it is Bozzio. I should read it before I hit Submit.
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  #35  
Old 05-20-2002, 11:01 AM
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Bill Ward! Listen to anything from the album "Paranoid." He was wildly inventive with his fills and never used the same one twice. Very underrated drummer. And he played a tiny kit in those days (kick, snare, one rack, one floor, crash, ride and hi-hat) and made it sound HUGE.
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  #36  
Old 05-20-2002, 11:07 AM
Why A Duck Why A Duck is offline
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I always liked Roger Taylor from Queen. Decent drummer, wrote some good songs, had a helluva voice.
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  #37  
Old 05-20-2002, 11:08 AM
Why A Duck Why A Duck is offline
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Oh, and for name quality alone, Bun E. Carlos from Cheap Trick deserves a nod.
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  #38  
Old 05-20-2002, 12:11 PM
astorian astorian is online now
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To Already in Use:

I'll have to do some searching to find a cite, but I'm quite certain that several members of "the Wrecking Crew" (a team of veteran session musicians, usually including drummer Hal Blaine and guitairist/bassist Carol Kaye) played on Frank Zappa's "Freak Out" album.

In fact, Carol Kaye (who played with Blaine on hundreds, maybe thousands of records in the 1960s) tells some hilarious stories about the "Freak Out" sessions. She actually had to beg off playing on a few tracks, because she was scandalized by the lyrics, and didn't want her children to think she'd played on dirty songs (she says Zappa was suprisingly amiable and understanding of her qualms).
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  #39  
Old 05-22-2002, 10:53 PM
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Thanks, astorian. Anything to feed my current obsession with Zappa. The name Carol Kaye actually sounds familiar, and now that I think of it, there is a list in the liner notes of Freak Out! that mentions people who also played on it; some of the Wrecking Crew might be in it (although session musicians are traditionally uncredited). There is also a horn section on that album, and his band had no horns at the time, so that was all session musicians.

Anyway, as for my favorite rock drummers, I don't really listen to the drumming as much as the melody generally, but I think my favorite drummers are probably Ringo Starr, Mitch Mitchell (although he was more '60s), and anyone who played with Frank Zappa.
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  #40  
Old 05-22-2002, 11:11 PM
Melon Farmer Melon Farmer is offline
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Bonham and Moon, pretty obvious, but still 1 and 1a in my book.

Also, Stewart Copeland, probably my favorite living drummer.

And another vote for Bill Ward, glad to see him mentioned. Ward and Butler made up one of the greatest rhythm sections ever if you ask me.
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  #41  
Old 05-23-2002, 04:56 AM
japatlgt japatlgt is offline
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Carl Palmer.
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