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  #1  
Old 11-07-2002, 05:12 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Does "Reply to all" go to BCC addresses?

Er, what the subject says. If I send out a group email using a BCC list, and somebody hits "reply to all", does their reply go to the BCC'd addresses to?
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  #2  
Old 11-07-2002, 05:29 AM
Mort Furd Mort Furd is offline
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No.
The BCC causes each person in the BCC list to get a copy of the message without the addresses of the others in the list. That's the whole point of BCC.
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  #3  
Old 11-07-2002, 06:05 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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That's what I was hoping to hear, but Googling came up with mixed advice, including warnings that replies would still go to BCC addresses. Are you sure?
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  #4  
Old 11-07-2002, 06:32 AM
Mort Furd Mort Furd is offline
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Sure I'm sure. unless you are using a really crappy mail client.
Try this:
Send yourself a message with you own address in the "TO:" field and your own address twice in the "BCC:" field. You should get three messages, all three adresses "TO:" your address. Then examine the headers. It should be fairly obvious if the "BCC:" stuff is still there.
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  #5  
Old 11-07-2002, 06:48 AM
asterion asterion is offline
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[hijack] What's BCC and what does it stand for? [/hijack]
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  #6  
Old 11-07-2002, 06:51 AM
therealblaze therealblaze is offline
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CC=carbon coby
BCC=blind carbon copy
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  #7  
Old 11-07-2002, 06:55 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Well, I can answer asterion at least. BCC stands for "blind carbon copy", and it's one of the address options on an email. You address a message "To" one or more people, and you can also put addresses in the CC (carbon copy) field. All recipients will see the names of the other people that get a copy.

But if you want to send a message to someobody and also send it to somebody else but without the recipient knowing that it's going to that other person, you would use BCC.

Similarly, you can use it, as I am doing, to send out a group email to a load of people, none of whom can see who else it is going to, by sending it to yourself and putting all the other addresses in the BCC field.

(Don't worry, I'm not sending spam - I'm off on a big trip at the weekend and will be sending email newsletters from time to time, but various people wouldn't want their addresses broadcast to all my other friends)
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  #8  
Old 11-07-2002, 06:55 AM
Crusoe Crusoe is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by asterion
[hijack] What's BCC and what does it stand for? [/hijack]
Address field for emails that hides all other addresses in the BCC field from each recipient. If you address an email to person A, and in the BCC field enter addresses for B, C and D, then A will only see themselves as the sole recipient, while B, C and D will see their own address and that of A (but nobody else's).

Very useful at work - e.g. sending emails to clients and copying in your boss for reference.
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  #9  
Old 11-07-2002, 06:55 AM
asterion asterion is offline
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This a throwback to paper?
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  #10  
Old 11-07-2002, 06:58 AM
Early Out Early Out is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by asterion
This a throwback to paper?
No, it's all done electronically - there's no paper involved.
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  #11  
Old 11-07-2002, 07:01 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Quote:
No, it's all done electronically - there's no paper involved.
But of course the reason it's called "carbon copy" is a throwback to paper memos, and instructions to secretaries on who should get carbon copies.
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  #12  
Old 11-07-2002, 07:12 AM
Early Out Early Out is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by r_k


But of course the reason it's called "carbon copy" is a throwback to paper memos, and instructions to secretaries on who should get carbon copies.
True enough. Some people have started referring to it as "courtesy copy" and "blind courtesy copy." I'll wager there are a fair number of youngsters who don't have a clue what a "carbon" is!
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  #13  
Old 11-07-2002, 07:13 AM
Crusoe Crusoe is offline
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Carbon? Ain't that one o' them real purty short rifles?
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  #14  
Old 11-07-2002, 07:17 AM
Early Out Early Out is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Crusoe
Carbon? Ain't that one o' them real purty short rifles?
No, no. You must be thinking of "carabiner."

[This thread is in serious danger of wandering off into a malapropism fest.]
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  #15  
Old 11-07-2002, 07:20 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Yep. Anyway, thanks for the answers, folks. Mods: feel free to close this thread now.
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  #16  
Old 11-07-2002, 07:33 AM
dantheman dantheman is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Mort Furd
No.
The BCC causes each person in the BCC list to get a copy of the message without the addresses of the others in the list. That's the whole point of BCC.
That's the whole point of the initial message, but aren't those other email addresses there somewhere, but hidden? The question is about a reply to an email, not the initial email itself. So when one clicks "Reply to All", does the reply factor in those hidden emails?
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  #17  
Old 11-07-2002, 07:42 AM
Mort Furd Mort Furd is offline
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If the email client and server are working properly, there should be no trace of the BCC addresses in the messages others on the BCC list receive. This eliminates the possibility of the replying to every one on the BCC list.
Sendmail (as a mail transfer agent) does this for you. There are also some clients that do this.
Damifino what a screwed up MTA might do, though. I'm particularly thinking of MS Exchange. I haven't the faintest idea what it does, but it may be that it screws up the BCC stuff - which would account for the conflicting information about BCC.
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  #18  
Old 11-07-2002, 07:45 AM
dantheman dantheman is offline
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Well, I reanswered the question, and my answer was the same as Mort's. I sent an email to myself here at work with my home email as the BCC. Then I took the received email from work and clicked Reply All. This would either send that email to just the original sender (me at work) or to the original and the BCC (me at home).

I received the second email at work. Did not receive it at home.

All is well in the land of dan.
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  #19  
Old 11-07-2002, 07:49 AM
lee lee is offline
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It can, but it should not. In cc:Mail it used to be that reply to all replied to bcc: addresses as well. More sane mailers do not work that way. The only way to be sure is to run tests.
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  #20  
Old 11-07-2002, 07:58 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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OK, I've now done what I should have done before and consulted the help file (I'll be using Yahoo! Mail):

Quote:
A Compose Mail window will appear. If you clicked "Reply", the sender's email address will appear in the "To:" field. If you clicked "Reply All", then in addition to the sender's address, the addresses of all of the other recipients will appear in the "To:" and/ or "Cc:" fields, according to the way they were listed in the original message. You can also add new email addresses if you wish.
So, looks like you were right, Mort Furd.
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  #21  
Old 11-07-2002, 08:14 AM
Mort Furd Mort Furd is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by dantheman
Well, I reanswered the question, and my answer was the same as Mort's. I sent an email to myself here at work with my home email as the BCC. Then I took the received email from work and clicked Reply All. This would either send that email to just the original sender (me at work) or to the original and the BCC (me at home).

I received the second email at work. Did not receive it at home.

All is well in the land of dan.
Now take the message you received at work and have your mail program show you the raw text of the message. You should not find any trace of the BCC address anywhere.
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  #22  
Old 11-07-2002, 09:41 AM
ultrafilter ultrafilter is offline
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Actually, I don't think that CC stands for "carbon copy". Once upon a time, it was common practice to pluralize a single-letter abbreviation by doubling the letter. That's where we get "pp." for pages, "ff" for following, and "cc" for copies. I know this came up on the boards before; I'll try to dig up the thread.
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  #23  
Old 11-07-2002, 09:45 AM
ultrafilter ultrafilter is offline
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Found it! Check the first response.
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  #24  
Old 11-07-2002, 10:30 AM
hawthorne hawthorne is offline
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Nice one, ultrafilter.

As it turns out, it's identical to the second response. Blind hamsters I suppose.
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  #25  
Old 11-07-2002, 12:41 PM
Joe_Cool Joe_Cool is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Early Out

No, no. You must be thinking of "carabiner."

[This thread is in serious danger of wandering off into a malapropism fest.]
No, no, Carabiner was that movie with Liza Minelli, wasn't it?

(flipping channels to try to find Electric Company...)
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  #26  
Old 11-07-2002, 12:47 PM
Early Out Early Out is offline
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Willkommen, Beinvenu, Welcome.....
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  #27  
Old 11-07-2002, 02:57 PM
RiverRunner RiverRunner is offline
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Quote:
Actually, I don't think that CC stands for "carbon copy".
Rats. ultrafilter beat me to it. I discovere the same thing on the same thread. I learn something new every day.


RR
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  #28  
Old 11-07-2002, 06:48 PM
Early Out Early Out is offline
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From the "help" files in Outlook 2002:
Quote:
Cc is an abbreviation for carbon copy.... Bcc is an abbreviation for blind carbon copy.
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  #29  
Old 11-07-2002, 06:58 PM
dantheman dantheman is offline
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Oh, sure. Like Microsoft would know.
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  #30  
Old 11-07-2002, 07:02 PM
Early Out Early Out is offline
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Despite what Polycarp had to say on the subject (that cc stands for "copies"), The American Heritage Dictionary defines cc as an abbreviation for carbon copy. Acronym Finder comes up with 179 hits for cc, none of which is "copies." Sorry, folks.
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