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  #1  
Old 03-19-2003, 10:42 PM
Melraidin Melraidin is offline
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Newfoundland-Lab mix (Dog breeds)

Could anyone tell me their experience with the personality's and physical characteristics of mixed Newfoundland-Labradour retriever, or Newfoundland-Golden retriever?

I really like the characteristics I've read about the Newfoundland, and would like an idea of what I would see in these two mixed breeds.

Please note, I'm not really looking to get a dog immediately, and these are simply two mixed breeds I'm interested in at a pet rescue center near me.

As well, I know I can't get real factual answers to these questions, but I hope someone with experience with these breeds and possibly with these mixed breeds could chime in?
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  #2  
Old 03-19-2003, 11:28 PM
Lissa Lissa is offline
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You can't necessarily count on a dog having certain characteristics just because of their breed, such as intelligence, or friendliness. Dogs are just as unique in personality and "smarts" as people are. You'll need to spend some time with any dog that you're interested in to see if the dog has what you want as well as suiting you and your lifestyle.

My dog is a Norwegian Elkhound/Golden Retriever mix. (Both parents were pure-bred. The Retriever escaped his yard, and a passionate, but brief affair ensued with the female Elkhound, resulting in thirteen adorable mutts.) In my dog, I got the best of both breeds, but I was careful in my selection, picking the puppy that had the best score on the quick Puppy Test I gave them.

Mutts really are the best dogs. They are less prone to genetic illnesses, and you have the chance of getting the best of the characteristics of both breeds. Just make sure you check the dog thoughoughly before taking them home with you.
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  #3  
Old 03-20-2003, 12:17 AM
Melraidin Melraidin is offline
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Certainly, I understand that I really can't rely on a breed's usual characteristics in the case of a single dog. Still, the physical parts are fairly consistent (Newfoundland's have long hair, etc.). As well, the behavioural characteristics, while more varied, do definitly have an inherited bias to them.

For example, my family used to have an English Springer Spaniel. She was a great dog, and while my mother did take her to obedience school while she was young, she was never trained for hunting or anything of the sort. Even so, there are a couple times that I can remember her scratching at the door wanting to come back inside, and when I went to let her in I found that she had a young bird (most likely fallen from its nest) in her mouth. The bird was completely unharmed (at least from my quick visual analysis). Other times while going for a walk with her I found that if she saw a bird or squirrel far away, instead of running barking at it (as she would if it were close), she'd stop dead still and hold a front paw up and her tail straight, pointing right at it. In these cases I would praise her, and think to myself how amazing it was that she would do these things without any training whatsoever.

So I suppose my question still stands, is there anything that in your experience could surprise me about these mixed breeds? While I haven't had a chance to meet these particular dogs, from the general characteristics of the breeds I'd imagine their inherited behaviour would be likely to reinforce each other, with the dog being even more eager to play in the water, etc.

Once again, I'd just like to say that although I do value whatever responses I may get here, I certainly won't be getting a dog based purely on others experiences. I wouldn't consider getting a dog without having time to meet with him/her and seeing if we could get along.
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  #4  
Old 03-20-2003, 04:55 AM
KenP KenP is offline
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My dog is a 13-year-old Newfie/? mix, and is the smartest, best-natured dog I have ever owned.
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  #5  
Old 03-20-2003, 06:40 AM
11811 11811 is offline
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Just from basic, picked-up while reading dog magazines info, I'm thinking a Newfie/retriever mix would be fond of water, so I hope you have a pool/lake/river nearby. Newfies have a reputation for being very calm and (I thought) not a high-activity dog.
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  #6  
Old 03-20-2003, 07:38 AM
Kiger Kiger is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Lissa
Mutts really are the best dogs. They are less prone to genetic illnesses, and you have the chance of getting the best of the characteristics of both breeds. Just make sure you check the dog thoughoughly before taking them home with you.
I respectfully disagree. If you get a dog from a responsible (key word there) breeder, you will most likely get a good tempered, healthy pet. Putting two different breeds together is a crapshoot which is why there are so many mutts at the pound. And on the flip side, indiscriminant breeding is why there are also so many purebreds at the pound.

Here's a good website on how to find a responsible breeder:
http://www.flyball.com/fastfourward/goodbreeder.html

And here is another about the current "poo" dog craze:
Much Ado About Poo
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  #7  
Old 03-20-2003, 08:25 AM
newfiemom newfiemom is offline
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I also have to respectfully disagree. There is a myth that mutts are less prone to genetic illnesses and that simply is not true. If two dogs with hip dysplasia are bred then there is a high probabilty that the litter is going to have hip dysplasia. Newfs are also prone to Sub valvular aeortic stenosis, cystinuria, hypothyrodism and elbow displaysia. Please think twice before you think of breeding these two breeds. I have been around newfies for 35 years and know alot about them. Yes they are good tempered but it does take training and love. I have four newfs now and I have one that I would never breed even though he is show quality...he loves to push my buttons too much. Newfs also shed and drool and require alot of maintenance. Please re think this.
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  #8  
Old 03-20-2003, 08:28 AM
cmkeller cmkeller is offline
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Well considering that Newfoundland and Labrador is a single province, maybe the Newf/Lab mix can actually be thought of as a purebred...
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  #9  
Old 03-20-2003, 08:42 AM
newfiemom newfiemom is offline
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Not really, they are two separate breeds bred for two different things and should be kept that way. I really don't like this new designer breed fad sweeping thru America. People breed dogs that they shouldn't be breeding and when they know nothing about canine genetics or anything about breeding period.
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  #10  
Old 03-20-2003, 08:57 AM
Kalhoun Kalhoun is offline
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I had a Newfoundland/Golden mix pup. Unfortunately, she died. But damn, she was cute!
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  #11  
Old 03-20-2003, 09:21 AM
Melraidin Melraidin is offline
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Hrmm... I think there may have been a misunderstanding here. I'm not looking to breed any dogs, mixed breeds or not. As well, I'm not looking for a 'designer' breed. I'm just looking for some information about possible consequences of these particular mixed breeds. The post was simply brought to mind as a pet rescue shelter near me has Newfoundland mixed breeds available for adoption.
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  #12  
Old 03-20-2003, 10:11 AM
Gulo gulo Gulo gulo is offline
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When you say "lab/Newfie mix". I think "a big goofy dork."

Obviously I'm not near this dog to test it's personality, nor do I know it's appearance (is it on Petfinder.com?) so it's hard to guess since all dogs are different, regardless of breeding.

I'm guessing it's floofy, big and will love water. So I'd say, be prepared to brush a lot, do some obedience training so it doesn't drag you around, and off to a lake to take it swimming. Do you want a big wet dog in the car? Does it drool? Newfies have those loose flews and tend to let loose with the saliva.

Have you sat with anyone at the shelter and discussed this dog? Taken it for walks? That would be the best way to really gauge this dog and see if it's a good mix for you. I have no idea if you work, have kids or what type of home you're in, so that's a whole other issue. The shelter people should give you the third degree in this department. If they don't, don't adopt from there.

(An as for the whole hybrid vigor thing, well, a dog is only the product of what went into it. There's no magic mutt gene that prevents them from getting sick.)
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  #13  
Old 03-20-2003, 10:14 AM
Gulo gulo Gulo gulo is offline
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Oh, and to add:

I know that labs/goldens are starting to have a lot of problems with hip/elbow dysplasia. Newfies too. So you may just want to keep that in mind. I'm not trying to scare you off this dog, I just think you should be aware of possible issues.
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  #14  
Old 03-20-2003, 11:09 AM
CrazyCatLady CrazyCatLady is offline
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One thing that might take you by surprise is how hard-headed some labs and goldens can be. I don't mean stupid (although a few undoubtedlly are), I mean flat-out pig stubborn.They can make things a real challenge sometimes. Combine that with the size and strength of a Newfie, and you could have a problem.

Labs also shed like hell, far more than you'd expect from a short-haired dog. If you object to large quantities of long hair everywhere and constant brushing and grooming, you won't be happy with this trait.
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  #15  
Old 03-20-2003, 11:19 AM
newfiemom newfiemom is offline
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Well, newfs do shed and drool alot. They are prone to many genetic disorders as so are Goldens. Goldens tend to be a bit neurotic due to bad breeding. I would spend as much time as I possibly could with the dog before making the decision. Newfs are quite large ( my largest weighs 195 lbs) and take a long time to finish growing. How old is the dog? It may not be finished growing yet.
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  #16  
Old 03-20-2003, 11:45 AM
Moirai Moirai is offline
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If it was a purebred Newf, I would worry about it's care and feeding during it's puppyhood, as they must be fed properly for proper bone growth. However, that may not be as much of an issue with a mix.

I have no experience with Newf mixes, but I do have experience with purebred Newfs.

Large, lovable, messy, loyal, great with kids. Will fit their activity to YOUR lifestyle- if you are active, the dog will be too, but he is just as happy to hang out on the couch.

A mix may solve the drooling problem- look closely at this dog while at the shelter, especially after drinking water. Think Turner & Hootch. I have drool 6 feet up my walls from strong head-shaking. Also, daily brushing is a must, as is a good vet who knows your breed very well.

Although they are huge, they don't necessarily need to eat a ton of food. Check with your vet. A strict diet can help relieve pressure on joints in big dogs.

Our Newfs range from 135 lbs (bitch) to 170 lbs (dogs), with an average of about 150 lbs. They take up a lot of room in the house, on the bed and on the couch.

They are the most amazing, loving, gentle giants I have ever known, and I highly recommend the breed to experienced large-breed owners.

A mix could be lovely. Spend as much time as you can with the dog, and get as much history as you can on how it was raised, the sire and bitch, etc. Good luck and have fun!
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  #17  
Old 03-20-2003, 05:36 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Quote:
Not really, they are two separate breeds bred for two different things and should be kept that way.
Certainly, if you want a dog for one of those two things. But most people who get labs are not looking for a dog to retrieve birds for them, they're looking for a pet. Likewise with Newfs, though I'm not sure what purpose they were bred for. But so far as I know, there's no breed of dog which was bred for the purpose of being a pet, so you can't get the exact specific breed you're looking for.
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  #18  
Old 03-20-2003, 05:45 PM
Moirai Moirai is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by cmkeller
Well considering that Newfoundland and Labrador is a single province, maybe the Newf/Lab mix can actually be thought of as a purebred...
I think this was meant as a geography joke!
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  #19  
Old 03-20-2003, 06:14 PM
Lissa Lissa is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Kiger
I respectfully disagree. If you get a dog from a responsible (key word there) breeder, you will most likely get a good tempered, healthy pet. Putting two different breeds together is a crapshoot which is why there are so many mutts at the pound. And on the flip side, indiscriminant breeding is why there are also so many purebreds at the pound.
I didn't mean to say that any mixed dog would definately be free of any possible genetic illness, just that it's a bit less likely.

Perhaps I'm a bit prejudiced against pure-bred dogs. I would never consider buying a pedigreed animal when there are so many adorable mutts in the pound, who are not long for this world unless they find a good home quickly. But that's just me, and I don't have anything against those who do prefer a pure-bred dog.

You're right that the most important factor is finding a reputable breeder. My mother had a bad experience with a dog who was severely in-bred. She thought the dealer was a good one, but found out differently once it was too late.
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  #20  
Old 03-21-2003, 06:26 AM
newfiemom newfiemom is offline
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"Likewise with Newfs, though I'm not sure what purpose they were bred for"

Newfs were bred for the purpose of pulling in fishing nets, pulling carts and as water rescue dogs. Their exploits as water rescue dogs are notorious and were always kept on board fishing boats in case anyone fell off. They were extensively used in Newfoundland and especially in and around the city of St. Johns.
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  #21  
Old 07-09-2010, 06:04 PM
pharside4 pharside4 is offline
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what is a newfoundland lab mix like?

To answer the original question, my wife and I just adopted a 5 month old newfie-lab mix and we think he's great. He seems to have inherited all of the best traits of both breeds. He has the longer soft hair of the newfie, he doesn't shed much at all, drools only when hot or excited, he has the mellow temperament of the newfie, all in the body size of a lab. He is very good with our toddlers, completely ignores the cats, shows absolutely no food aggression and is completely kennel broke and house trained by 5 months. And as long as we give him a toy to play with once in a while, he leaves everything else alone. He's beautiful, soft, friendly, playful, and affectionate. We couldn't ask for a better dog. The only problem we have is that our cocker spaniel hates him.. LOL
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  #22  
Old 07-09-2010, 11:15 PM
whiterabbit whiterabbit is offline
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I would assume you would potentially have a totally awesome dog there. A lot of totally awesome dog. Are you up for the amount of brushing it might take? I've brushed out a Newfie. Lovely dogs, awesome dogs, adore them. But oy, it's a lot of work!
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  #23  
Old 05-10-2012, 12:41 PM
kellynmac18 kellynmac18 is offline
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I have a Newfie/Lab mix!!! :)

They are such wonderful dogs...we actually were online today looking at photos of different breeds of dogs, and discovered the mix. We haven't actually considered the mix before for our Molly, and upon doing some research found a photo that we actually mistook for her!! She is so nurturing. She is has all of the best qualities of both dogs. She has a shorter stature because of the legs that her lab part contributes, but the girth of the Newfie, so it definitely lends to some presumable weight issues and hip issues. She is turning 10 in November. She has some issues with tumors, but so does our other lab so we are figuring that must be her lab part. But as far as personality goes, great dog...definitely one of my best friends, and one of the best mixed breeds anyone could ever ask for.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jreed/3...n/photostream/
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  #24  
Old 05-10-2012, 01:30 PM
Sailboat Sailboat is offline
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Originally Posted by Kiger View Post
I respectfully disagree. If you get a dog from a responsible (key word there) breeder, you will most likely get a good tempered, healthy pet. Putting two different breeds together is a crapshoot which is why there are so many mutts at the pound.
I realize I am replying to an old post, but that's not why there are so many mutts at the pound.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiger View Post
And on the flip side, indiscriminant breeding is why there are also so many purebreds at the pound.]
OK, now we're closer to agreement.
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  #25  
Old 05-10-2012, 02:12 PM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is offline
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Originally Posted by Gulo gulo View Post
I'm guessing it's floofy, big and will love water. So I'd say, be prepared to brush a lot, do some obedience training so it doesn't drag you around, and off to a lake to take it swimming.
And invest in a heavy-duty shovel to pick up full-sized poop.
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  #26  
Old 05-10-2012, 03:31 PM
Satellite^Guy Satellite^Guy is offline
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This is the only one of the mixes you were asking about, that I could find at my favorite dog site, dogbreedinfo.com.
There's no "official" information on the mix, but there's the personal experience of one owner of that hybrid breed of dog.
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  #27  
Old 05-10-2012, 08:19 PM
thelabdude thelabdude is offline
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Originally Posted by Lissa View Post
You can't necessarily count on a dog having certain characteristics just because of their breed, such as intelligence, or friendliness. Dogs are just as unique in personality and "smarts" as people are. You'll need to spend some time with any dog that you're interested in to see if the dog has what you want as well as suiting you and your lifestyle.

My dog is a Norwegian Elkhound/Golden Retriever mix. (Both parents were pure-bred. The Retriever escaped his yard, and a passionate, but brief affair ensued with the female Elkhound, resulting in thirteen adorable mutts.) In my dog, I got the best of both breeds, but I was careful in my selection, picking the puppy that had the best score on the quick Puppy Test I gave them.

Mutts really are the best dogs. They are less prone to genetic illnesses, and you have the chance of getting the best of the characteristics of both breeds. Just make sure you check the dog thoughoughly before taking them home with you.
Very well put. I haven't seen any Lab/Neufs. but crosses with Goldens and Flat Coated Retrievers usually have the Lab's short hair, and yes, they shed, shed, shed twice a year. I find a pin cushion brush the best defense.

As for personality, it depends more on the individual parents and early socialization. Many of my Labs, even a couple whose mother loved living on the lake, wanted nothing to do with water. I usually get a puppy in the fall. They aren't exposed to a pond or creek until maybe the next summer.

I agree Labs can be strong willed. That is part of the reason they dominate the guide dog world. You need a dog that will refuse a dangerous command. Once trained, strong willed dogs stay on task better.
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  #28  
Old 05-12-2012, 11:32 AM
thelabdude thelabdude is offline
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The latest research suggests the breed has little to do with allergies, http://www.henryford.com/body.cfm?id...etail&ref=1405 allergies They can test the saliva individual dogs and determine if they will be a problem. Finding somebody to do such testing now could be a problem.
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  #29  
Old 05-12-2013, 07:45 AM
Appalonia Appalonia is offline
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Neufie/Lab mix

I rescued a mix that the vet pegs 90% neufie and 10% lab. He is the sweetest most loving dog ever. Very easy to train. Extremely shy, probably because of his abuse history before I adopted him. There is something in his spirit that makes me love him with all of my heart. I have had him for three years and I do protect him from too much stimulation and from people who don't understand boundaries, because he gets very nervous in those situations, again, I am sure, bc of past abuse.
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  #30  
Old 05-12-2013, 08:25 AM
esmeralda2 esmeralda2 is offline
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Originally Posted by Melraidin View Post
Hrmm... I think there may have been a misunderstanding here. I'm not looking to breed any dogs, mixed breeds or not. As well, I'm not looking for a 'designer' breed. I'm just looking for some information about possible consequences of these particular mixed breeds. The post was simply brought to mind as a pet rescue shelter near me has Newfoundland mixed breeds available for adoption.
I understand. There is a dog at the rescue shelter who is a Newfoundland - Lab mix. And you are wondering what kind of dog it would be. First, breeding does matter as far as personality and intelligence in dogs. Sure, they are all individuals, but they are also bred for certain qualities. Labs are generally very intelligent and gentle natured. I believe Newfoundlands are similar. My problem with Newfoundlands is they are so large. I prefer the size of a typical Lab. Both Labs and Newfoundlands love to swim, so you really do need to live near some water. Your dog will appreciate it no end. My Lab could play fetch in the water for hours, until my arm was about to fall off. I think it would probably be a very nice dog. But, in all cases, you do need to go tothe trouble of training it well. A well trained Lab is a great dog! I would do some research, read up on the qualities of both breeds.

Last edited by esmeralda2; 05-12-2013 at 08:28 AM..
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  #31  
Old 05-12-2013, 12:37 PM
Sahirrnee Sahirrnee is offline
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Originally Posted by 11811 View Post
Just from basic, picked-up while reading dog magazines info, I'm thinking a Newfie/retriever mix would be fond of water, so I hope you have a pool/lake/river nearby. Newfies have a reputation for being very calm and (I thought) not a high-activity dog.
HA!

Tell that to the Newfie walks me several times a week.
Think of a 100 pound quivering mass of hairy lab on speed.
She has knocked holes in the sheet rock from leaping down a half flight of stairs and sliding into the wall.

She laughs in my face at the word 'NO!', putting her collar on her can take a good five minutes and as she wiggles, squirms, rolls over, tap dances, and leaves me battered and bruised.
Just picking up her leash has her charging into and bouncing off the door.

Heel means slow down,
sit means bounce on your haunches,
down means roll over and kick me with your feet,
stay means pause for a half second before charging through the door and dragging me down the sidewalk.

If I am sitting on the couch and she wants it she simply climbs on top of me and tries to push me off.

This is after she went to obedience school.

Every step of the way I get her to get into a calm submissive state and if I so much as move one inch she is up and bouncing again.

I've pet sat for 3 different Newfies and I would not call any of them calm or low-activity.
Stubborn, bull headed, willful, strong, determined, obstinate, bossy...

Last edited by Sahirrnee; 05-12-2013 at 12:38 PM..
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  #32  
Old 05-12-2013, 12:44 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Old thread, but I'd saying that if you play the odds, Lab/Newfie is a good mix.
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  #33  
Old 05-12-2013, 12:53 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Sounds like a great happy gentle friendly-to- the-max dog. And an insanely great swimmer.

I agree the diff between a Golden and a Lab in an eventual mutt probably makes no nevermind. In a very few cases, I've found that Labs are just a smidgen stronger willed than Goldens, who are, like Newfies, the gentlest and most willing to please doggies out there.

They both are proverbially famous for homes with children, from babies on up.
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  #34  
Old 05-12-2013, 12:58 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Just saw this for zombie dogs. Even they are probably great.
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  #35  
Old 10-03-2013, 09:53 PM
tara008 tara008 is offline
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The Most Amazing Dogs Ever

I know this is a reallllly late reply, but that mix of dog is amazing! Yes, they are big, so everything is more-medicine, poop, food, vet cost, etc., but what they bring to your life is amazing! My mom owned one that was half black lab and half newfie. She was about the length of the lab, was a little taller than a lab, had a long fluffy black flat coat and her normal weight was about 97 pounds. She was a lazy calm dog around the house after the age of 2, but would run or would get active if you made her. We just lost her a couple days ago at the age of 8 because of what they think was a tumor in her heart. She did have some kidney issues, but a diet change had fixed that and had her values back to normal. Other than that her only other health problem was the hip dysplasia, which most of these big dogs get, she was being treated with medicine because hers wasn't advanced enough to need surgery. Her temperment was so sweet and she was such a lover. She was always ready to meet any person or animal and was never aggressive. My 4 year old neice lives with my mom and she adored her. The day she came home from the hospitall all she did was smell her and lick her. From then on they were best buds and my neice could do ANYTHING to her. She did love attention and knew how to work people to get it! She was a very smart dog and responded much better to a calm stern command, than someone yelling at her, but there really wasn't much discipline needed for her. She did like to escape, but as she got older she would actually come back pretty quick. Cooper lived with two cats and NEVER had a problem with them. I know a lot of people said that these dogs would probably love water, not her-she hated the hose or baby pool. If you want a dog that is a good family dog, fits into your life style, actually cares about you as much as you care about them, is calm and caring, is gentle, will get along with other animals and will be a huge part of your household-then this dog is for you! The only thing my mom complained about was her shedding, especially twice a year when she blew her undercoat.
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