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  #1  
Old 03-28-2003, 10:17 PM
astro astro is offline
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Is there any animal that can outrun a man over a 100 mile race?

In terms of animals that run I recall reading somewhere that a man can eventually run down any other creature that runs on land over a long distance (say 100 miles). Is this true?
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  #2  
Old 03-28-2003, 10:19 PM
Boyo Jim Boyo Jim is offline
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Show me a man that can run a hundred miles.
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  #3  
Old 03-28-2003, 10:24 PM
Gorsnak Gorsnak is offline
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I'd think it's far from true. Many large plains herbivores can run at high speeds almost indefinitely - bison, antelope, etc, and I would guess that wolves wouldn't be very far behind. Humans do have very good endurance characteristics, though probably that's more psychological than anything else, but you'd need a lot more than 100 miles for that to come through. That's only a 4 hour lope for a bison. No cite, sorry.
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Old 03-28-2003, 10:25 PM
Hermann Cheruscan Hermann Cheruscan is offline
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I thought they had some sort of "super marathon" that totalled over a hundred miles.
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  #5  
Old 03-28-2003, 10:30 PM
SmackFu SmackFu is offline
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Ultramarathon, in fact. For a 100-mile race, winner usually finishes at around 15-17 hours for the men.
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  #6  
Old 03-28-2003, 10:42 PM
t-keela t-keela is offline
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Where in the HELL did you hear this? I'm an old horseman from way back...while few horses are capable of travelling distances in excess of 50 or 60 miles at a stretch. I have had an occasion to ride a few with the ability to endure treks of over a hundred miles per trip. Granted my ass didn't much like it, but I've been over a hundred miles in a day many times on a horse in daylight hours.

Matter of fact, I had an appendix bred colt one time that I swear could do it in less than 6 hours. If I really pushed that guilding he could probably do it in 4.
But probably the best animal I ever rode was a damned mule. That bitch could maintain a gait of 20 miles an hour from sunup to sundown.
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Old 03-28-2003, 11:05 PM
wolfman wolfman is offline
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I'm not an expert on the sport or anything, But I believe the Iditorod dogs have gone 1100+ miles in ten days. That's averaging more than 100 miles a day for ten days pulling a decent load through snow. I WAG that any of those dogs could easily beat a the 15 hours SmackFu cited on dry ground with no load(What is the average ground speed of an unladen Sled dog? ).
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  #8  
Old 03-28-2003, 11:07 PM
astro astro is offline
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Human Beats Horse In UAE Desert Race

Quote:
In the first race of its kind in the Middle East, U.S. runner Tom Johnson squeaked out a narrow victory over U.S. rider Jennifer Nice aboard the Arabian Al-Buraq in a 50-mile endurance race held

Feb. 6 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Johnson finished 10 seconds ahead of the horse-and-rider pair, which had a mandatory one-hour hold on the course, an advantage Johnson used.

Johnson finished the 50-mile desert race in 5:45. “It was a big challenge for me, and I did it,” Johnson, 42, told Reuters news service. “In the last meters of the race, I looked behind to see the horse approaching, so I increased my speed to maximum and I won.”
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  #9  
Old 03-28-2003, 11:15 PM
scr4 scr4 is online now
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Here is an example of a 100 mile dog sled race. The winning time is 10 hours.
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  #10  
Old 03-28-2003, 11:23 PM
astro astro is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by scr4
Here is an example of a 100 mile dog sled race. The winning time is 10 hours.
Yes, but doesn't the fact that the dogs run in teams and have their foot provided to them, make a dog sled team a somewhat different entity than an individual dog or wolf loping across the plains?
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  #11  
Old 03-28-2003, 11:25 PM
astro astro is offline
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PIMF foot = food
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  #12  
Old 03-29-2003, 12:10 AM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is online now
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I'll tell you what animal can beat a man in a 100-mile race -- a woman. And afterwards, she can trip him and beat him to the ground.

Ya gotta keep an eye on them women.
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  #13  
Old 03-29-2003, 12:45 AM
Astroboy14 Astroboy14 is offline
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Heck, put me in my Jeep and a cheeta or a horse might beat me off the line... but I assure you that I'd be in the lead at the 100 mile mark! The key is brains, not brawn.
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  #14  
Old 03-29-2003, 04:08 AM
peepthis peepthis is offline
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How about 1,000 miles in 1,000 hours??!! It's going on right now, and requires each runner (only 6 started the race, and I believe it's down to only a few now) to run at least one mile every single hour of the day -- so the sleep deprivation will be the most difficult part. Also,
Quote:
The six athletes will spend six weeks running -- or walking -- 38 times around the route of the London Marathon. They will finish by competing in the actual London Marathon on April 13 to determine the overall winner.
So they still have to run a marathon when they're done! If someone finishes, this will be one of the most remarkable feats of endurance in history.
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  #15  
Old 03-29-2003, 04:22 AM
scr4 scr4 is online now
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Quote:
Originally posted by astro
Yes, but doesn't the fact that the dogs run in teams and have their foot provided to them, make a dog sled team a somewhat different entity than an individual dog or wolf loping across the plains?
I don't think it would make a big difference. Even in a team, a dog can't take a break and get pulled by others. Maybe there's a tiny aerodynamic advantage to being in a pack, but I think the ultra-marathon runners also run in packs much of the time. As for food, don't marathon runners get sports drinks during the run? Or is it just water?

By the way, I don't think any land animal can beat a human on a bicycle. A fit cyclist can manage 100 miles in 5 hours. I believe the world record is around 3 1/2 hours.
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  #16  
Old 03-29-2003, 04:28 AM
SPOOFE SPOOFE is offline
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I sure can outrun any animal... just gimme two seconds to start my car...
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  #17  
Old 03-29-2003, 07:59 AM
casdave casdave is offline
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Quote:
A fit cyclist can manage 100 miles in 5 hours
A fit cyclist will make 200 miles in 12 hours. The best make around 300.
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  #18  
Old 03-29-2003, 08:06 AM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is online now
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Seriously, I have encountered what I think may be the source of the OP's info ... speculation that the way that early hominids hunted was to wound or just plain separate out an animal from the pack, and then run it down over long distances. The idea being that most animals are adapted to run quickly over relatively short distances -- to avoid being pounced on by large predators like lions and crocodiles and tigers and such. Human would just chase the animal relentlessly until it was exhausted, even though over the short distance it could outrun them easily.

I think the nakedness and sweating of humans was cited as ways early humans handled the heating caused by such long chases, giving them an advantage over their prey.

I'm kinda neutral on the theory -- iit's plausible, but seems like a LOT of effort to expend to catch prey.

I don't have a cite, but given that it's a paleoanthopology theory, it might be easier to check up on now.
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  #19  
Old 03-29-2003, 09:18 AM
aahala aahala is offline
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I think it preposterous to believe man can outrun EVERY animal over a hundred mile distance. The story of the tortoise and the hare not withstanding, burst speeds matter.

If a man is not ahead in the first 25 miles, I don't believe he can win. The rough maximum foot speed for man is about 13 miles per hour over this distance and what would it be for the rest?

There are a number of animals with burst speeds greater than 40 mph. After the first quarter of the race, man would have to run continuously but the animal only a small portion of the time, the remainder being rest.

Agriculture might not have arisen if it actually was the case man could outrun every animal.
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  #20  
Old 03-29-2003, 09:35 AM
jsjoll jsjoll is offline
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Why?

Only humans would want to try and run for a hundred miles in the shortest period of time! As an earlier poster said, a horse or even donkey could easily beat a person but that's only if they have a human on top of them whoppin' on them with a stick. Let's face it, people who run Marathons don't do it for their health, it's incredibly destructive to the human body to run 26 miles. I have nothing against people who what to be healthy but these people have some kind of problem.

To quote one of two men being chased by a bear, "I don't have to be faster than the bear, I just have to be faster than YOU!"
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  #21  
Old 03-29-2003, 09:50 AM
David Simmons David Simmons is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Boyo Jim
Show me a man that can run a hundred miles.
This site describes the Death Valley to Mt. Whitney race of 135 miles. In that race the runners also gain about 14,800 ft. in altitude.

Most of them are also nuts.

The winner makes it in 26 to 30 hours. That is a pace of about 4.5 to 5.2 mi/hr. That's not a closed course, race track pace but it ain't bad.

The long distances that the dogs and horses travel are all at the urging of people. Left to themselves it might be questionable whether or not an animal would push itself this hard.
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  #22  
Old 03-29-2003, 10:04 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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It depends, what kind of car is the man in?

Yep there is also a race in Colorado that is 100 miles long. All of it takes place between 9 and 11,000 feet (thats a guess but close)
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  #23  
Old 03-29-2003, 10:17 AM
Arturas Arturas is offline
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Slowly all this is coming out. A horse carrying a burden (a rider) is not the same as one that's being ridden. And any animal that senses death approaching (i.e. a hunter) is also going to have adrenalin working for it. But if we are talking about a wounded animal, say one running on only three legs, they are less likely to finish 100 miles. In that case we are not talking about outrunning all animals, just all predators. Now in that case, man would win. Animals are not dedicated usually, perhaps because they prefer to stay within their own territory. Cats definitely do not have endurance, however I do not know if they would follow a blood scent walking 100 miles. Haven't heard of fox or coyotes trailing prey that far. Seems wolves might. They can most likely run the distance but would they need to? If they wounded the animal themselves, then they would pretty much be able to keep pace with a wounded animal, just not with a healthy one. In any case, they would follow the blood trail at a comfortable pace, even walking, not racing. Of course, an animal being pursued is going to make noise, attract other predators (coyotes can hear a mouse in leaves 1/2 a mile away-Missouri Department of COnservation), so will the original predator be the one to down the animal? Bears are scavengers, not hunters, at least as far as other mammals are concerned. Reptiles are cold blooded with no endurance. What else is there of size? Small predators obviously are not going to be going 100 miles.
The Indians were said to be able to run that far and the women did keep pace, winning a fair number of races fairly, at least in Missouri.
On the other hand, if we are talking about the urban dweller in the West, well, just call me 'eaten', because I sure won't be eatin' if I have to run even 10 miles.
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  #24  
Old 03-29-2003, 11:39 AM
David Simmons David Simmons is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by David Simmons
This site describes the Death Valley to Mt. Whitney race of 135 miles. In that race the runners also gain about 14,800 ft. in altitude.

I seem to have overstated the altitude gain. The race ends as Whitney Portal which is 8300 ft altitude, not Whitney summit at 14,445. It's pretty bad when you can even read your own cite correctly!
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  #25  
Old 03-29-2003, 04:20 PM
Robot Arm Robot Arm is online now
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Quote:
Originally posted by David Simmons
This site describes the Death Valley to Mt. Whitney race of 135 miles. In that race the runners also gain about 14,800 ft. in altitude.
I can top that. Coming this June 15th, in Jamaica, Queens, New York, it's the Seventh Annual Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race. I think it's on level ground, though, so those Mt. Whitney wimps still have some bragging rights, I guess.

Or don't multi-day events count? Cause it looks like if you're not done in 51 days they scrape you off the pavement and pour you in a box.
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  #26  
Old 03-29-2003, 05:32 PM
panamajack panamajack is offline
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Don't feel too bad, David Simmons -- they do actually go up about 13,000 feet on the trip (and descend 4,000) so you weren't too far off (although (no offense) I'm guessing the number may only have been a happy coincidence ).
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  #27  
Old 03-29-2003, 05:34 PM
t-keela t-keela is offline
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"If I really pushed that guilding he could probably do it in 4. "

make that gelding...gotta learn to preview

The question is:
Is there any animal that can outrun a man over a 100 mile race?

answer= YES

Can WE think of scenarios that are exceptions, of course we can.
Are there animals that man can beat, yes.

BUT

I've watched horses run ALL DAY long playing with each other in the fields. Running their asses off all day long, no rider, no load, no fear...just running. There is no fucking man on earth that could keep up. Forget about all the bullshit analogies.

I couldn't swear to the distance they'll run in a day. But the pasture near the barn has a fence roughly 3 miles square (12m. perimeter) and they'll go around that damned fence and across the field dozens of times a day. You figure it out!
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  #28  
Old 03-29-2003, 05:37 PM
t-keela t-keela is offline
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Where did the predator requirement come into play?
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  #29  
Old 03-29-2003, 05:41 PM
t-keela t-keela is offline
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I have hunted and tracked many large game in North America and most can be caught eventually. Usually because of wits, not speed. If a big cat wanted to lose me he could. That's the difference, I have to make him feel like he did lose me. There's no way I'm gonna just outrun him.

BTW a cougar can travel hundreds of miles in a very short time when motivated.
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