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  #1  
Old 04-29-2003, 12:48 PM
MaxTheVool MaxTheVool is online now
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Finger in gun barrel

In an action novel I read many years ago, the good guy thwarted the bad guy by sticking his finger into the barrel of the bad guy's gun, causing the gun to explode when the bad guy pulled the trigger (this did cost the good guy his finger). In a somewhat similar scene (on a different scale), Indiana Jones stuffs a rock down the barrel of a tank gun in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, again causing the gun to explode.

Is either scenario possible? Why or why not?


thanks...
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  #2  
Old 04-29-2003, 12:51 PM
friedo friedo is online now
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There is the famous Gyrojet gun, which fired solid-rocket based rounds with a muzzle velocity so slow you could stop them with a finger over the barrel. But with a traditional gun, no way. The bullet would just lob your finger right off.
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Old 04-29-2003, 01:09 PM
Padeye Padeye is offline
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Plugging a barrel can make a gun blow up. This has been known to happen with rifles and shotguns when careless hunters allow mud to plug the end. Even a bit of rainwater in a shotgun barrel is enough to cause a barrel bulge when the shock wave hits the uncompressable water. P.O. Ackley IIRC tested the Japanese Arisaka rifle (WWII bolt action rifle) by leaving a cleaning rod in the barrel. Amazingly the gun didn't blow up in the expected way but the force tore the threads off the barrel, launching it like a projectile.

That said it's really hard for an adult to get a finger in a gun barrel save for shotguns. If you have very small fingers you might get a pinkie inside a .45 caliber barrel but that's marginal.
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  #4  
Old 04-29-2003, 02:04 PM
Max Carnage Max Carnage is offline
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All I've seen happen is the shotgun barrels get really big and the blast comes out the wrong end in the shooter's face.

Bugs then plants a big kiss on the shooter's mouth, ties the barrels into a bow, and goes diving into his hole.
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  #5  
Old 04-29-2003, 02:15 PM
BF BF is offline
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In response to the OP, yes. The projectile is pushed down the barrel by the esaping gases caused by the explosion (fast burn) of the propellant. If the propellant gas has no egress, ie., out the end of the barrel, the gases must go somewhere, which results in a shattered barrel end and/or shattered breech (where the catridge is loaded). This is more commonly seen with shotguns, as their barrel thickness is usually much less than a rifle, depending on it's configuration.
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  #6  
Old 04-29-2003, 02:28 PM
Riboflavin Riboflavin is offline
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As Padeye points out, an adult would have a hard time getting a finger into most gun barrels; I have thin fingers and my pinkie won't go into a .45 barrel. If you just cover the muzzle then the gun is very unlikely to explode, but putting something deep in could very well damage the gun (and finger), exactly what would happen depends on how strong the gun is, how powerful the cartridge is, and how complete the blockage is.

I'd say that it's incredibly unlikely to work, your action hero would have a much better chance if he attempted to just deflect the gun. He could also try to push back the slide (on a pistol), which would leave the chamber partially open and the gun either unable to fire or unable to fire properly, or to get a finger in between the hammer and firing pin (for a revolver or pistol with exposed hammer), which would stop the hammer from falling.
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  #7  
Old 04-29-2003, 02:28 PM
NameAlreadyTaken NameAlreadyTaken is offline
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If I remember the museum correctly, the Gettysburg Battlefield information center has a nice cannon where the barrel exploded. I don't recall the exact details, but I'm pretty sure I read that the barrel had been fouled by too many shots and the last cannon ball got stuck for long enough to explode the base of the barrel. It's a pretty impressive amount of force considering how thick the gun barrel was and that we are talking about black powder.
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Old 04-29-2003, 02:37 PM
Nametag Nametag is offline
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Don't forget James Garner in Support Your Local Sheriff; IIRC, it went like this: Blustering Bad Guy draws his six-shooter and menaces Garner with it; Garner indignantly shoves his finger in the muzzle. Bad Guy yells "Get your finger outta my gun!" Garner refuses. Something happens, Garner relents, and Bad Guy clutches his pistol protectively, saying: "If I'd a' pulled the trigger, this gun would a' blown up in my face! I could a' been killed!"

Garner: "Yeah? Well, it wouldn't have done my finger any good, either!"
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  #9  
Old 04-29-2003, 03:48 PM
NurseCarmen NurseCarmen is offline
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It will foul the reload on a semi automatic if your finger manages to interupt the recoil/chambering. I'd think you would be better off doing this against an semi-auto. I don't think a revolver would be as effected. If all you are doing is trying to stop a second shot. A hole in your hand is better than your head. The projectile would be disturbed enough by back pressure that some of it's force would be taken away. The bullet wouldn't reach the velocity it normaly would, but it would still ruin your day.

IIRC, a couple years ago a banger in my town blew his hand to pieces trying out a homemade silencer.
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  #10  
Old 04-29-2003, 04:12 PM
Spavined Gelding Spavined Gelding is online now
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Quote:
Originally posted by NameAlreadyTaken
If I remember the museum correctly, the Gettysburg Battlefield information center has a nice cannon where the barrel exploded. I don't recall the exact details, but I'm pretty sure I read that the barrel had been fouled by too many shots and the last cannon ball got stuck for long enough to explode the base of the barrel. It's a pretty impressive amount of force considering how thick the gun barrel was and that we are talking about black powder.
I suspect that what you are thinking of is a 12 pounder light gun from Rorty’s Rhode Island Battery. During the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg, during the cannonade that preceded Pickett’s Charge, the bronze gun tube was struck at the muzzle by a solid shot deforming the bore right at its mouth. When the next round was loaded the shell hung up at the muzzle and could not be forced down the tube even by whacking it with a sledge hammer. When the gun cooled the muzzle permanently clamped down on the partially loaded shell. I think the gun is in a state museum in Rhode Island.

Incidentally, Civil War artillery, especially iron or wrought iron gun tubes, was subject to rupture with unpleasant consequences for the gun crew.
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  #11  
Old 04-29-2003, 05:00 PM
Khadaji Khadaji is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Nametag
Don't forget James Garner in Support Your Local Sheriff; <SNIP>
I was gonna mention that. One of my favorite old movies.
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  #12  
Old 04-29-2003, 05:36 PM
Sengkelat Sengkelat is offline
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Don't forget also Lethal Weapon, where Mel Gibson sticks his finger in a gun. (It may have been Lethal Weapon 2, 3, 5, 73, whatever, but it was one of those) I believe in that case the intent was merely psychological, rather than intended to explode the gun, but it wasn't explicitly stated either way.
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  #13  
Old 04-29-2003, 06:06 PM
mmmiiikkkeee mmmiiikkkeee is offline
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In order to actually plug the end of the barrel, wouldn't you have to have your finger jammed in there so hard that the metal barrel would rupture from the pressure? That's pretty tight... just try holding back the flow from your garden hose with a finger. But I guess you're just trying to obstruct the barrel, not absolutely seal it.

A few years ago I saw a cop show with recreated crime scenes, and one where a cop was one his back with the bad guy sitting on his chest trying to shoot him. The cop talked about trying to get his finger between the trigger and the ... "round guard thing that goes around it" (sorry, my gun terminology really sucks) -behind the trigger, so that he couldn't pull the trigger back all the way. Said something about being trained to do that, as the guy could crush your finger but wouldn't be able to fire the gun.
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  #14  
Old 04-29-2003, 06:24 PM
Padeye Padeye is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by mmmiiikkkeee
..trying to get his finger between the trigger and the ... "round guard thing that goes around it" (sorry, my gun terminology really sucks) -behind the trigger, so that he couldn't pull the trigger back all the way.
That would be the trigger guard.

Not an easy manuever to pull off as there is so little room behind the trigger that it would be hard to wedge one's fingertip there. Yes, blocking it would prevent some guns from firing and there is even a safety device sold for Glock pistols that works just this way.
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  #15  
Old 04-29-2003, 06:38 PM
Alien2022 Alien2022 is offline
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If something was jammed in there sufficiently to create a psuedo air-tight seal, then it is feasible... After all, the pressures from the superheated gasses... will be quite extreme. And if they have no place to go out, then they have to go somewhere. BOOM!!!!

Gun probably wouldn't explode per say, but it definitely would be damaged.
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  #16  
Old 04-29-2003, 06:55 PM
Gunslinger Gunslinger is offline
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mmmiiikkkeee: all you have to do is slow down the bullet, then it does the sealing. It basically turns the gun barrel into a pipe bomb.

The Stupid Gun trick: on a 1911 (Gov't model) .45, the trigger is designed such that you can't get a finger behind the trigger. So you could grab the guy's wrist and push the flat of your hand hard against the front of the gun, pushing back the barrel and slide far enough that the disconnector engages, as if the gun's been fired and is ejecting the empty case (the disconnector is what keeps it from going full-auto if you hold down the trigger). Of course, if you let go, all he has to do to reset the mechanism is release the trigger, so it's best to have somebody with a large blunt object standing by when you do this.

Disclaimer: Do not try this at home, with an actual gun, especially not a loaded one, it's just as stupid as sticking your finger in the barrel, information for entertainment purposes only, I assume no liability if anybody actually tries it and hurts themself, etc.
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  #17  
Old 04-29-2003, 07:20 PM
Blake Blake is offline
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Quote:
In a somewhat similar scene (on a different scale), Indiana Jones stuffs a rock down the barrel of a tank gun in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, again causing the gun to explode.
Now that's possible. Most tank rounds have a primer mechanism set off by violent movement. This is set off by the force of the propellant during firing. This effectively arms the shell, meaning that the explosive inside will detonate when it hits something. With a rock wedged firmly in the barrell the fired shell will simply explode in the barrell even without the gasses built up behind it. I'm not sure however if the primer activates fast enough to arm the shell before it leaves the barell.
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  #18  
Old 04-29-2003, 11:27 PM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is online now
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Quote:
Originally posted by Sengkelat
Don't forget also Lethal Weapon, where Mel Gibson sticks his finger in a gun. (It may have been Lethal Weapon 2, 3, 5, 73, whatever, but it was one of those) I believe in that case the intent was merely psychological, rather than intended to explode the gun, but it wasn't explicitly stated either way.
I don't know of a finger-in-the-barrel scene in Lethal Weapon, but in the first movie Mel Gibson is about to shoot himself and Danny Glover blocks the gun's hammer with his hand, preventing it from firing.

As far as I know, finger-in-the-barrel bits only work in the cartoons.
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  #19  
Old 04-30-2003, 12:20 AM
engineer_comp_geek engineer_comp_geek is online now
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Quote:
Originally posted by Spavined Gelding
I suspect that what you are thinking of is a 12 pounder light gun from Rorty’s Rhode Island Battery.
Nope. I happen to live about 15 miles from Gettysburg, and downstairs in the exhibit center is one damaged cannons mixed in among all the others. I managed to find a picture of it on the web:

http://www.virtualtourist.com/vt/d13e5/

From the web site:
Quote:
Imagine the rage of the battle seeing this cannon which had exploded.
It's been a while since I've taken the tour, but as I recall there is a plaque near the cannon that says no cannons exploded during the battle of Gettysburg. This one exploded at some sort of celebration later, but had been used in the battle of Gettysburg. That's my memory of the exhibit, but I wasn't able to find a cite for it on the internet.
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  #20  
Old 04-30-2003, 08:43 AM
Phage Phage is offline
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Gwahh!!! GWAHHH!!! GRRAWWW!!!! WTF?? You can plug a barrel enough to make it explode... but only with something approaching the strength of the rest of the gun. In my experience guns are usually made out of metal, while fingers are made out of flesh! I can see that a semi-automatic pistol would have a higher pressure in the barrel for a moment, and repeated firing with a finger in the barrel might cause the slide spring to wear out a little faster... but I would think that it would continue to reload, as the required gas pressure would be enough.

Don't even think about trying to stop a shotgun with your finger... sploit! While you can maybe damage a gun a little with the finger approach, I think that the best bet in the long run would be to try gnawing on it.
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  #21  
Old 04-30-2003, 11:43 AM
Sofa King Sofa King is offline
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What is a bullet if it's not a well-sealed plug in the barrel? A finger, even if you could get one into the barrel of a gun, would only be compressing the air between the moving bullet and the end of the barrel. Can that really be enough to cause a breach?
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  #22  
Old 04-30-2003, 12:22 PM
NurseCarmen NurseCarmen is offline
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Considering how instantanious the whole reaction is, changing it even the slightest will have violent reactions.
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  #23  
Old 04-30-2003, 12:49 PM
Bookkeeper Bookkeeper is offline
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  #24  
Old 04-30-2003, 12:50 PM
Padeye Padeye is offline
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A bullet moving down a barrel is very different from one just plugging the barrel. The difference is statis friction vs. dynamic. Think back to physics 101. Place a brick on a table. Measure the force needed to slide it. Notice that once it's moving much less force is required to keep it moving. The same principle works in guns and is the difference between firing a bullet and having a hand grenade with a trigger.

With a few exceptions I'll note later all bullets start moving in a free bore section where they do not seal the barrel. This distance may be from the cylinder to the barrel of a revolver or a section of a rifle barrel sometimes only a few thousands of an inch long. This allows the bullet to have some velocity before it is swaged (squeezed down) by the rifles section of the barrel where it makes a seal.

A good example of how a plugged barrel can blow up a gun is a squibb load in a revolver. A squibb is a cartridge with a missing or insufficient powder charge. The force of the primer is sometimes enough to put the bullet halfway down the barrel where it stops because the explosive force is not enough to overcome friction. No biggie.

It's a BIGGIE if the shooter fires another round. This actually happend in competition sometimes. The next bullet is being propelled by a sufficient charge. Unfortunately the stuck bullet requires much higher pressure to overcome it's static friction in the barrel. Since there is no place for the pressure to escape aside from a small cylinder gap something unpleasant will happen. Often the top of the cylinder explodes.

FWIW these squibb loads don't happen often. Some action shooting competitors uses "mouse fart" ammunition that is very low powered. This means less recoil to recover from making it easier to shoot fast. The difference between a normal round firing and a squibb is so small the shooter may not even realize it and sometimes the range safety officer has to stop the shooter from firing another round.

The exceptions are muzzle loading rifles which work with soft lead round balls or Minie balls. Also some rifle ammunition for target use is loaded so the bullet is *just* touching the rifling. It's not in the rifled section but there is no "free bore" section for the bullet to get moving. This technique is extremely sensitive to pressure variations in the loaded ammunition.
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Old 04-30-2003, 01:04 PM
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Quote:
If I remember the museum correctly, the Gettysburg Battlefield information center has a nice cannon where the barrel exploded.
This happened occasionally when a muzzle-loading cannon misfired during a battle. If the noise and confusion was great enough that the crew didn't notice, they could ram a second or even a third charge into the gun on top of the original charge. This would often cause the gun to burst when it finally fired. As well, Civil War breechloaders were prone to sudden barrel failure due to design and manufacturing flaws, although these were mostly larger cannon.

A bit more resistance than just sticking a finger against the muzzle, though.
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Old 04-30-2003, 05:37 PM
MaxTheVool MaxTheVool is online now
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Interesting... responses so far vary from "yes, it will work, even a few drops of water can make a gun misfire" to "no way in heck, only in the movies".


I'm no gun expert, nor particularly an expert in physics, but my instinct is that if you find a gun barrel that is just wider than your finger, and ram a good amount of finger down there (two knuckles or so), the gun will definitely jam, and very likely explode. The bullet flying along at a very high speed will encounter your finger, and even if it's going fast enough to tear your finger to shreds, those shreds would have nowhere to go, everything will compress, and the expanding gas will not have enough energy to close-to-instantaneously accelerate a sizeable chunk of mass to a very high speed, particularly taking friction into account.

But I don't really have any convincing evidence for that claim...
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  #27  
Old 04-30-2003, 06:00 PM
Padeye Padeye is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by MaxTheVool Interesting... responses so far vary from "yes, it will work,even a few drops of water can make a gun misfire" to "no way in heck, only in the movies".
Empahsis mine. No one said that. I said a little water, a few drops clining to the inside of the muzzle, in a shotgun barrel can cause a bulge when fired.

I'm pretty sure the early M-16 could suffer a burst barrel from rainwater. Keep in mind that the bore is only .224", smaller than a pencil, so a few drops could form a "water plug." The early M-16 also had an extremely thin walled barrel. Rifle cartridges often have peak pressures of upwards of 50,000psi and a plugged barrel would normally cause a failure in the reciever or bolt rather than the barrel.
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  #28  
Old 04-30-2003, 06:28 PM
SenorBeef SenorBeef is offline
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It seems intuitive to me that...

Well, the expanding gasses are all behind the bullet, so the bullet is riding the edge of the gasses. So the first thing that's going to come into contact with your finger is the bullet. It's traveling at quite a velocity, and is quite a bit harder than your finger, so it seems that the bullet would (somewhat explosively) push your finger, or at least little bits of it, forward and out of the barrel. The bullet exits with reduced velocity because of the friction it overcame, and the gasses exit the barrel before the pressures get very high.

Where am I going wrong? Would the bullet not push the finger out? Would the time it takes to push the finger out delay the expansion of the gas by a tiny fraction of a second, but enough time to cause a rupture maybe?
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  #29  
Old 04-30-2003, 09:37 PM
Padeye Padeye is offline
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The flaw in the logic SenorBeef is that things don't work the same way at high speed as they do low. If that were the case there would be no danger in getting water or mud in a rifle barrel because the bullet would just push it out. In any event it wouldn't be the bullet pushing the obstruction in front of it but a pressure wave from the compressed air between the bullet and the objstruction. With a finger type obstruction it's possible you might get the chinese finger trap effect. The pressure wave would hit the finger faster than it can push it out of the way. The pressure on the finger caused it to expand to the sides plugging the barrel even tighter. That's just a semi-educated WAG though.

As for the finger plugging the barrel it would all depend on lots of factors but we've pretty well determined an adult couldn't fit a finger in in any common barrel anyway. I'll leave it to someone else to do such experimentation.
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  #30  
Old 08-05-2010, 08:36 AM
youwillloseahand youwillloseahand is offline
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since this is a top google result and nobody gave a solid answer for six years here you go .... myth busters episode 43 ... you will lose your hand.

Test 1 (gel hand): Buster's gel finger was stuck inside the shotgun barrel. The entire hand was blown apart with no damage to the shotgun.

Test 2 (wax hand): They used a stronger ballistic hand made of wax to plug the barrel. The wax hand was blown apart but the shotgun barrel was ballooned slightly.

At this point they declared the myth busted and moved on to trying to replicate the myth. They wanted to get a 'banana peel' result by firing the shotgun.

Test 3 (dirt): Tory stuffed the barrel of a shotgun with dirt. The end of the barrel peeled back slightly, but the shooter was fine.

Test 4 (Steel spike): They welded a steel spike into the barrel. The gun shot the spike out with only minor damage to the end of the barrel.

Test 5 (squib load): A squib load is a bullet that doesn't have enough gunpowder to exit the barrel. Jamie hammered a bullet into the end of the barrel. The end of the barrel bulged, but it didn't banana peel.

Not only was this myth busted, but MythBusters failed at even replicating the result of this myth.

mythbusted While it was cool that they ballooned the end of the barrel, it didn't explode, the hand was blown apart, and the shooter was safe.

http://kwc.org/mythbusters/2005/11/e...s_cures_f.html
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  #31  
Old 08-05-2010, 09:48 AM
MikeF MikeF is offline
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I had a squib load myself while shooting a Sig 9mm. It was a combat drill and (if IIRC) the weapon jammed due to the lack of pressure to cycle the slide completely. I followed the "jam drill" and fired the next round. The slide locked about halfway back due to the now bulged barrel and both bullets were eventually forced out with a "ram" of some sort. Certainly no exploding gun.
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Old 08-05-2010, 10:38 AM
Fubaya Fubaya is offline
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Originally Posted by youwillloseahand View Post
since this is a top google result and nobody gave a solid answer for six years here you go .... myth busters episode 43 ... you will lose your hand.
So all they tested were shotguns? I call shenanigans. I've seen the results of firing a rifle with a plugged barrel twice firsthand. The barrel ends up looking like a peeled banana.
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Old 08-05-2010, 10:41 AM
Stranger On A Train Stranger On A Train is offline
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Originally Posted by Sengkelat View Post
Don't forget also Lethal Weapon, where Mel Gibson sticks his finger in a gun. (It may have been Lethal Weapon 2, 3, 5, 73, whatever, but it was one of those) I believe in that case the intent was merely psychological, rather than intended to explode the gun, but it wasn't explicitly stated either way.
You're thinking of Maverick (in which Gibson stars as the title character and Glover appears in a Lethal Weapon-referenced cameo).

To the o.p., no, a finger won't cause enough of a blockage to prevent the bullet and exhaust gases behind it from exiting. A drop of water in the barrel of a rifle or musket, however, can be enough to jam the bullet against the barrel and cause it to bulge or split. Cannon shells may explode their charge for reasons previously indicated.

Stranger
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  #34  
Old 08-05-2010, 11:06 AM
Alessan Alessan is online now
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I once knew a soldier who lost a finger while presenting arms. Nothing happened to his weapon.
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  #35  
Old 08-05-2010, 11:41 AM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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What's that thing you pull back on an auto handgun and then springs forward on a shot?

In a demonstration of Krav Maga (Israeli self-defense style) the guy showed--as an absolutely last resort Hail-Mary kind of move--to jam your hand between that thing and the end of its path.
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  #36  
Old 08-05-2010, 11:41 AM
yoyodyne yoyodyne is online now
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The OP probably doesn't have any fingers left by now, but as far as water goes:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJTi2TjR1UQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_oh4KHnBB4U
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEXRfWJNzG8
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  #37  
Old 08-05-2010, 11:58 AM
PlainJain PlainJain is offline
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Originally Posted by yoyodyne View Post
WTF? Glock make an underwater firing pin?
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  #38  
Old 08-05-2010, 12:10 PM
JoelUpchurch JoelUpchurch is offline
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Originally Posted by Stranger On A Train View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sengkelat View Post
Don't forget also Lethal Weapon, where Mel Gibson sticks his finger in a gun. (It may have been Lethal Weapon 2, 3, 5, 73, whatever, but it was one of those) I believe in that case the intent was merely psychological, rather than intended to explode the gun, but it wasn't explicitly stated either way.
You're thinking of Maverick (in which Gibson stars as the title character and Glover appears in a Lethal Weapon-referenced cameo).
I think it was Support Your Local Sheriff! and Walter Brennan was holding the gun and it was James Garner's finger.
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Old 08-05-2010, 12:17 PM
Fubaya Fubaya is offline
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[QUOTE=PlainJain;12768284]
Quote:
Originally Posted by yoyodyne View Post
WTF? Glock make an underwater firing pin?
Yes, it only takes a special set of spring cups to allow water to pass by the firing pin. It would still fire without them but the pressure in the firing pin channel would blow your hand off. They're not meant for firing underwater, but for use in a maritime environment.
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  #40  
Old 08-05-2010, 03:15 PM
sqweels sqweels is offline
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When I took a gun safety course as a kid, one the exhibits was a double-barrel shotgun that had been painted white--for a wedding to be borne by the ceremonial shotgun-bearer.

One of the barrels had a big blowout on it becasue IIRC enough paint had gotten inside the barrel to casue it to misfire when they later used it for hunting.
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  #41  
Old 08-05-2010, 05:59 PM
Blake Blake is offline
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Originally Posted by MaxTheVool View Post
In a somewhat similar scene (on a different scale), Indiana Jones stuffs a rock down the barrel of a tank gun in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, again causing the gun to explode.

Is either scenario possible?

That one, at least, is perfectly possible. Explosive tank shells have a problem in that the shock they receive from being fired is more than enough to cause the shell to explode. That's not a good thing. To overcome that most shells have a primer that is set by the force of being fired. Before that primer is set the shell can't explode no matter what. After it's set the shell will explode when it strikes something solid.

So if you shove a rock down a tank barrel the shell is primed at firing. When it meets the rock the shell then explodes.

Note that this has nothing whatsoever to do with pressure building up in the barrel. The explosion is caused by the shell itself exploding when it meets a solid object, something that it is carefully designed to do. You could achieve a similar result by having the rock just outside the barrel where there is no way for gas pressures to build up. The shell is simply designed to explode when it hits something solid. Normally this should be a building, a vehicle or something similar. Unfortunately the shell doesn't know the difference between a rock in the barrel and a building 100 metres away.
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  #42  
Old 08-05-2010, 07:10 PM
Fubaya Fubaya is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2008
I'm still stuck on this Mythbusters test. I really gotta see that episode.

Here's a couple of rifles being blown apart by obstructions. I don't know anything about the first, but the second supposedly happened after the guy left a laser boresight in the rifle (it's basically a laser that you stick in the barrel for sighting purposes and should obviously be removed before firing).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yJSoEBkG7i0 (the guy doesn't get hurt)

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b26/AFarCry/Rifle.jpg

I've seen this happen once and I've seen another where it did basically the same thing in the middle except both ends of the barrel were intact. In the second case, the stock was shattered but the shooter was somehow unharmed.

I have no idea how Mythbusters welded a steel spike into a shotgun barrel and shot it out with only minor damage and I doubt a finger would do this, but obstructions do blow up barrels.
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  #43  
Old 08-05-2010, 10:50 PM
Kobal2 Kobal2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo Bloom View Post
What's that thing you pull back on an auto handgun and then springs forward on a shot?

In a demonstration of Krav Maga (Israeli self-defense style) the guy showed--as an absolutely last resort Hail-Mary kind of move--to jam your hand between that thing and the end of its path.
That would be the slide.
And I'd think trying to fiddle with it could be dangerous, since the gun can still fire once if you're not pulling/pushing the slide all the way back. The shot might not be at full power if the ejector port is partially uncovered as gas will escape that way instead of pushing the bullet forward, but you'd still end up shot some.
Safer to control the hammer (for non gun-nuts, that's the thingy the hero always pulls back with his thumb to let the bad guys know he's serious). If you're holding the hammer in place, the gunman can pull the trigger all he wants, that gun isn't going off.

Oh, and I wouldn't call Krav Maga a "self-defense style". It's more of an interpretative dance where the concept you're interpreting is "SCREW YOU" .
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