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  #1  
Old 06-19-2003, 06:47 PM
Susma Rio Sep Susma Rio Sep is offline
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Neutralizing salt and sugar

What chemical substances or chemical procedures or kitchen tricks can be employed to neutralize sugar or salt?

Here are the situations:

1. Cooked or prepared dish or drink happen to contain too much sugar or salt;

2. You happen to have eaten too much and too highly sugared or salted foods.

To neutralize here means to render the chemicals that are sugar or salt into compounds, not possessed of the food and chemical properties of sugar or salt, but at the same time at least tasteless, and very important also harmless.

Thanks for any helpful information or suggestion. I know some friends who are diabetic and/or plagued by hypertension, and therefore must not ingest sugar and salt like others who are freed of these liabilities.

Susma Rio Sep
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  #2  
Old 06-19-2003, 06:55 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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You might be able to cover up the taste of sugar or salt, but as far as rendering them safe for diabetics or hypertensives, you are out of luck. There is no way to take the salt out of Top Ramen or the sugar out of a Twinkie, at least not so they would still be recognizable as food.
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Old 06-19-2003, 07:51 PM
j.c. j.c. is offline
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If you happen to have eaten too much... that's all she wrote.

If you are cooking something, and it seems too salty, sugar and fat might overwhelm that. Too sweet can sometimes be cut a little with a splash of vinegar.

Or, you can give the whole mess to the dog and start over.
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  #4  
Old 06-19-2003, 08:13 PM
Nanoda Nanoda is offline
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You could always make the recipe bigger.
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  #5  
Old 06-19-2003, 08:25 PM
lorinada lorinada is offline
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Re: Neutralizing salt and sugar

Quote:
Originally posted by Susma Rio Sep
diabetic <snip> must not ingest sugar

Susma Rio Sep
How and where did this myth EVER get started? In over two decades of being a type 1 diabetic I have never been told I must not ingest sugar. On the contrary, fruit is highly recommended to even out the rate in which my blood sugar rises after a meal. And in fact, with me, rice and potatoes make my blood sugar spike higher than any candy bar ever has.

We must have carbohydrates of both types in moderation. Hey, just like we must moderate our proteins and fats, too! Hey, just like everyone without this "liability" should also do!

Oh, sorry for the hijack. This is just one of my pet peeves.
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  #6  
Old 06-19-2003, 09:25 PM
Tikki Tikki is offline
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This is not neutralizing the salt but I've heard that putting a sliced potato on oversalted soup will absorb the extra salt, then when you're ready to eat, you just throw the potato out.
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  #7  
Old 06-19-2003, 10:41 PM
antechinus antechinus is offline
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You could try dialysis. Just put the whole lot in a semipermeable bag and soak in agitated water for a few days. While you are at it, you might want to irradiate the lot first, to prevent growths.
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  #8  
Old 06-20-2003, 01:37 AM
chaoticbear chaoticbear is offline
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For the salt: I've heard the potato thing too... If you want to make your food inedible, try adding silver nitrate... that should precipitate out the sodium.

For the sugar: I don't know if it would work, and I probably wouldn't eat it later, but I know sulfuric acid works for pure sugar. Maybe if it's in a food, it will work too.
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  #9  
Old 06-20-2003, 01:55 AM
nebco9 nebco9 is offline
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I'll ring in at #3 for putting sliced potato in salty liquid to absorb the salt, and then throw the potato out.
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  #10  
Old 06-20-2003, 10:20 AM
robby robby is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by chaoticdonkey
For the salt: ... If you want to make your food inedible, try adding silver nitrate... that should precipitate out the sodium.
That would be a neat trick, considering that sodium nitrate (presumably the precipitate you're trying to produce ) is extremely soluble in water (even more so than sodium chloride).

Indeed, I'm not aware of any sodium or nitrate salts that are insoluble in water.

Cites:
http://www.thesciencedesk.com/SolubilityGraph.html
http://onsager.bd.psu.edu/~jircitano/soluble.html
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  #11  
Old 06-20-2003, 10:35 AM
Terminus Est Terminus Est is offline
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Adding silver nitrate should precipitate out silver chloride. You'll still be left with a mess of sodium and nitrate ions.
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  #12  
Old 06-20-2003, 10:53 AM
curly chick curly chick is offline
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I can't see what use it would be to precipitate the silver chloride out unless the OP has a centrifuge and the food is a liquid.
All you would have done would be turn the food from too salty to poisonous.

The potato trick works for salty foods, you can do it with bread, as well.

Sugary foods can be diluted, by making the recipe bigger, as has already been said on here, but by very little else in an ordinary kitchen.

The reason there is no real chemistry quick fix for these is that sugar and salt are both neutral compounds to start with.
Of course chemists make sugars and salts into other things in the lab, but temperature, pressure, catalysts and the associated specialist equipment are usually needed.
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  #13  
Old 06-21-2003, 10:14 AM
robby robby is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Terminus Est
Adding silver nitrate should precipitate out silver chloride. You'll still be left with a mess of sodium and nitrate ions.
...which will certainly not "precipitate out the sodium."
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