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  #1  
Old 07-12-2003, 12:38 PM
lukaspriest lukaspriest is offline
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Will getting a cat nuetered stop him from spraying?

So I have this wonderful cat. For whatever reason, my roommate elected never to have him nuetered. Well, my roommate has moved, entrusted me with the care of his cat, and I've just moved into a new apartment. the cat has NEVER sprayed before, and to my dismay, I caught him doing it in our living room the other day. There must have been a cat owner in the apartment before us. I dunno. Well, my question is, if I take in the cat to get nuetered, will this stop his drive to do that? Or is it something he's just going to continue to do?
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  #2  
Old 07-12-2003, 12:43 PM
Earl Snake-Hips Tucker Earl Snake-Hips Tucker is offline
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IANAV, however, here's my situation:

I have a 9-year-old male, neutered when he was about six months.

I have never, ever, ever seen him spray--although I've always seen him go thru the motions of backing up against something and twitching his tail. But he always shot blanks. That is, nothing ever came out.

Until recently. Somehow, the addition of a new kitty four months ago, he just in the past couple of weeks has started spraying for the first time.

Maybe he was doing it all along, but I never saw it until recently. But I think it might also have to do with the fact that he's in a new neighborhood with at least two male un-neutered male cats.

Good luck, but I doubt that it will stop him from spraying.
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  #3  
Old 07-12-2003, 01:41 PM
FisherQueen FisherQueen is offline
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Spraying is a way for a cat to mark his territory, so I'm not surprised yours felt the need to mark when he found himself in a strange place.

Neutering helps keep cats from spraying, but it works best if you have it done before the kitten reaches puberty. I had both my males neutered at 6 months and neither of them sprays.

But getting it done now would probably help. It's hard to predict what reaction an individual cat will have, but if this were my cat, I would definitely get him neutered. I have taken in an adult and had him neutered, and after the procedure, he only sprayed once. So I'd say that the procedure might stop the cat from spraying, or at least reduce the problem.

But, honestly, it's not that expensive, and you really ought to have it done. An unaltered tomcat is just less pleasant to live with for a variety of reasons, only one of which is spraying.
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  #4  
Old 07-12-2003, 02:50 PM
bubba jr bubba jr is offline
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An ex-girlfriend inherited her brothers cat from his ex-girlfriend. Turns out he wasn't fixed, he pissed all over everything, it was all he did. She had him fixed and he still pissed all over everything, she eventually had him put down.

Another cat I lived with, who was fixed sprayed, usually the refrigerator door, but he was just a jerk. Every morning he would wait until you woke up and took the morning leak, and then when you went to get your clothes to take a shower he would take a dump on the bathroom floor. Miserable, mean cat.

I would get him fixed, and hope that it is a new habbit if nothing else it won't smell as bad.
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  #5  
Old 07-12-2003, 02:56 PM
homercles homercles is offline
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Getting his nuts cut off will not stop this behaviour once it has already started. This behaviour is likely regulated by endogeneous hormones early on. That is they are playing an organizing effect as opposed to activating effect.
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  #6  
Old 07-12-2003, 03:33 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by homercles
Getting his nuts cut off will not stop this behaviour once it has already started. This behaviour is likely regulated by endogeneous hormones early on. That is they are playing an organizing effect as opposed to activating effect.
I would respectfully disagree that that is always the case. My old male cat was well into spraying and adulthood, when he finally sprayed my wife's leg. Welcome Mr. Eunuch, farewell Mr. Piss On Everything. He never did it again.
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  #7  
Old 07-12-2003, 04:22 PM
Musicat Musicat is offline
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IANAV, either, but my experience has suggested that neutering is most effective before the cat is too old and set in his ways. I had a mature cat fixed and it seemed to have little effect on his spraying habits. All my other cats in my lifetime had been fixed while young, and it always worked for them.

So it may not fix your problem (or his), but it's better to neuter than propogate.
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  #8  
Old 07-12-2003, 11:33 PM
lukaspriest lukaspriest is offline
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thanks for the replies. As mentioned before, he never has sprayed before, and he's only a year and a half old, if that. He has appointment for tomorrow morning at the humane society. To become a eunuch, not get put down. Thanks again
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  #9  
Old 07-13-2003, 05:06 AM
richardb richardb is offline
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Here are some statistics:

(From Neutering the Male Cat)

ROAMING
> 90% will reduce this behavior with neutering
Approx. 60% reduce this behavior right away

FIGHTING
> 90% will reduce this behavior with neutering
Approx. 60% reduce this behavior right away

URINE MARKING
> 90% will reduce this behavior with neutering
Approx. 80% reduce this behavior right away
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  #10  
Old 07-13-2003, 05:17 AM
richardb richardb is offline
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Actually, on rereading your post, I realize that this may not be "spraying" at all. As everyone else has said, neutering is a very good idea anyway, so go ahead by all means.

If this does not solve the problem, however, you can address other possible causes.

From this site, for example:

Feline House Soiling

Under the section headed "Urine Marking/Territorial Anxiety"
Quote:
Cats use urination and defecation as a means of communication with other cats. By leaving their “mark,” they are telling other cats “I was here on this date, and this time.” Other cats may then know this land has been claimed (or has not been recently claimed) and may act accordingly. Psychological stress, such as the presence of other cats, prolonged absence of the owner (who is usually viewed as a parent by the pet cat), or other problems may create a need for a cat to reassert a territorial claim. Signs that this kind of stress is causing the problem might include some or all of the following:

...
5. There has been a change at home leading the cat to feel he/she must reassert his/her territorial boundaries. (Examples: a new pet has been added, a new roommate has been added, a recent move to a new home, remodeling, the owner recently returned from a vacation, other neighborhood cats are visible or smellable in the yard.)
The site goes on to give possible solutions, including certain medications or a "cat pheramone" spray.

Good luck!
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  #11  
Old 07-13-2003, 11:15 AM
Gulo gulo Gulo gulo is offline
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My neutered male cat sprays. He usually does it to get attention when he feels he's being ignored. Bastard. He's been forced to become an inside cat due to his stupidity around cars and he doesn't like that one bit. I tried taking him out on a leash and it just made him worse. I had adopted him from the SPCA after he lost a battle with a car and received serious head injuries, which may explain his obsessive tendencies around the house.

Anyways, I clean it his markings with Nature's Miracle & block off the areas. He just finds a new place.

So has anyone here ever tried the "Feliway" product? That's my next attempt at stopping this before I start talking meds with the vet. I love this little bastard to death and euthanasia isn't an option.
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  #12  
Old 07-13-2003, 03:09 PM
Dalchini Dalchini is offline
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What is the disadvantages to neutering/spaying, besides inactivity?
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  #13  
Old 07-13-2003, 06:48 PM
bubbrrr bubbrrr is offline
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If not it'll make him wish he had
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  #14  
Old 07-13-2003, 07:21 PM
homercles homercles is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Chefguy
I would respectfully disagree that that is always the case. My old male cat was well into spraying and adulthood, when he finally sprayed my wife's leg. Welcome Mr. Eunuch, farewell Mr. Piss On Everything. He never did it again.
Respectfully acknowledged. It is possible that spraying is actually regulated by an activational, rather than organizational mechanism. My knowledge of cat behaviour and mediating hormonal mechanisms is rather scant.
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  #15  
Old 07-13-2003, 09:31 PM
BwanaBob BwanaBob is offline
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You can add "new baby" to list of environmental changes that'll turn ole Tom into a pisspot.

Our guy pissed in the baby's cradle (baby was not in it) but it was ruined and my wife wanted to strangle him (and it's her cat too!)

Eventually he realized the baby wasn't another cat and has stopped but we're always suspicious.
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