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  #1  
Old 01-17-2004, 12:05 AM
Lobsang Lobsang is offline
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Painful first bite of food. what's the cause?

I know it's silly to ask medical type questions on the SD but I have experienced this phenomenon for as long as I can remember. Probably all my life, and I am still alive.

If I haven't eaten for a while, and then I bite into something like a chocolate bar I feel intense pain in both my jaw joints for a few seconds. Each bite after that causes no pain at all.

It's more of an annoyance than a worry. I can live with it, I am just curious about it.
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  #2  
Old 01-17-2004, 12:15 AM
Blake Blake is online now
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It’s caused by the salivary glands compressing to squeeze out fluid in anticipation of the coming food. It happens to everybody occasionally, especially when they are hungry. Exactly why seems to be a mystery, but it’s probably just simple mechanical stretching of the nerves in the face.
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Old 01-18-2004, 03:20 AM
Vision of Love Vision of Love is offline
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LOL! I thought I was the only one that felt this. Well, my sister too. Whenever we experience this after biting into food we say we got "spasms."
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Old 01-18-2004, 12:56 PM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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If it happens mostly with things like chocolate, it could be due to sensitivity in the teeth. I get it when biting into, say, a Mars bar. I think it's the sugar.
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Old 01-18-2004, 11:51 PM
Una Persson Una Persson is offline
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There seems to be a relation to blood sugar levels, because this typically happens when I have low blood sugar (less than 60 mg/dl).
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  #6  
Old 01-19-2004, 02:39 AM
Blake Blake is online now
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Yep, it’s more noticable when people are hungry, which is the poor mans way of describing low blood sugar.. The body’s responses to food become more pronounced as appetite increases, and this includes the response of the salivary glands
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Old 01-19-2004, 05:22 PM
antechinus antechinus is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blake
Itís caused by the salivary glands compressing to squeeze out fluid in anticipation of the coming food. It happens to everybody occasionally, especially when they are hungry. Exactly why seems to be a mystery, but itís probably just simple mechanical stretching of the nerves in the face.
Could you provide a cite for this.

It could be reffered pain from dentin hypersensitivity.

The hydrodynamic mechanism is the most commonly accepted theory for dentin hypersensitivity. This is where stimuli applied to dentinal tubules causes movement of dentinal fluid stimulating nerves in the inner parts of the dentin.

High osmotic pressure from very sweet food can cause the movement of dentinal fluid thus leading to pain. As can cold and pressure.

What happens if you breath quickly through clenched teeth? Does this cause the same type of pain? This would cause evaporation on the surface of the tooth leading to fluid movement.

Perhaps you should see your dentist or purchase some toothpast that can depolarise the nerves.
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Old 01-19-2004, 10:25 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antechinus
Could you provide a cite for this.

It could be reffered pain from dentin hypersensitivity.

The hydrodynamic mechanism is the most commonly accepted theory for dentin hypersensitivity. This is where stimuli applied to dentinal tubules causes movement of dentinal fluid stimulating nerves in the inner parts of the dentin.

High osmotic pressure from very sweet food can cause the movement of dentinal fluid thus leading to pain. As can cold and pressure.

What happens if you breath quickly through clenched teeth? Does this cause the same type of pain? This would cause evaporation on the surface of the tooth leading to fluid movement.

Perhaps you should see your dentist or purchase some toothpast that can depolarise the nerves.
I get this too, and it doesn't really feel like breathing in quickly through clenched teeth. The feeling is much more centered around the jaw muscles than the teeth.
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Old 01-19-2004, 10:37 PM
The Great Zamboni The Great Zamboni is offline
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No cite, but I do have my own experience. Sometimes, when I take a bite, I get a pain in both sides of my jaw, then I begin to salivate immediatly. I'm pretty sure it's my saliva glands suddenly operating at high mode.
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Old 01-20-2004, 01:05 AM
Apex Rogers Apex Rogers is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by r_k
If it happens mostly with things like chocolate, it could be due to sensitivity in the teeth. I get it when biting into, say, a Mars bar. I think it's the sugar.
I get this too. Most noticeably with chocolate, but also other sweet stuff (candy, caramel popcorn, etc.). Is this a sign of poor dental health or just a natural reaction to sugar? I remember mentioning this to a dental assisstant and she was curious as to where the spot was, saying that it could mean a potential weakness in my tooth enamel.
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  #11  
Old 01-20-2004, 02:22 AM
Blake Blake is online now
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I don’t have a reference to hand Antechinus. Old memories dredged up from physiology lectures.

What is being described in this thread isn’t sensitive teeth. The pain itself is located at the angle of the jaw, behind and outside the wisdom teeth, rather than in the teeth themselves. I have suffered from sensitive teeth in the past, and it is a very different phenomenon.
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  #12  
Old 01-20-2004, 09:58 AM
Uncommon Sense Uncommon Sense is offline
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We`ve done this before. (search is way too slow to engage)

I suggested in that thread the same thing that Blake mentioned above. Since it happens to me also. The crampy painful feeling is always followed by a flow of saliva.
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Old 01-20-2004, 09:58 AM
Uncommon Sense Uncommon Sense is offline
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We`ve done this before. (search is way too slow to engage)

I suggested in that thread the same thing that Blake mentioned above. Since it happens to me also. The crampy painful feeling is always followed by a flow of saliva.
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  #14  
Old 01-20-2004, 10:58 AM
Flash-57 Flash-57 is offline
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Hmm. Not everyone has experienced this. I've never had the kind of pain mentioned earlier in the thread. I've had ice-cream headaches and had pains in the teeth from sudden doses of ice cream, but none of deep pain people are describing.
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  #15  
Old 01-20-2004, 11:31 AM
syncrolecyne syncrolecyne is offline
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If you have a cat, watch it's mouth whenever it sees a big fat pigeon land on the windowsill. It will get an audible salivary gland spasm. A hot fudge sundae or deep dish pizza does the same to homo sapiens.
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