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  #1  
Old 01-25-2004, 08:02 AM
KidCharlemagne KidCharlemagne is offline
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Soldier in the Marine Corp is called a marine; soldier in the Army is called ?

We refer to soldiers in the Marine Corp as "marines." Do we have an equivalent name for soldiers in the Army?
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  #2  
Old 01-25-2004, 08:14 AM
Paul in Qatar Paul in Qatar is offline
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People in the (US) Army are called Soldiers.
In the Marine Corps, they are Marines.
In the Navy, Sailors.
In the Air Force, Airmen (for both genders).
People in the Coast Guard are called Coast Guardsmen.

In the British military, there are many traditional titles like "Commando," "Rifleman," or "Gunner."
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Old 01-25-2004, 09:46 AM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Let's see, from my military career, I recall the Navy calling the Marines "Jarheads", the Marines calling the Navy "Squids", the Air Force calling the Army "Doggies", and the Army calling the Air Force "Zoomies". Everybody called the Coast Guard "Coasties". Nobody called the Reserves unless they had to.
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Old 01-25-2004, 11:02 AM
Anaclaidiabhal Anaclaidiabhal is offline
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--hijack--
Chefguy--you're absolutely right. I'm one of those nasty-stinkin' reservist jarheads. But when they do call on us, we get the job done. Then we go home and get fat and nasty again.
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Old 01-25-2004, 11:19 AM
Ezstrete Ezstrete is offline
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military name calling

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaclaidiabhal
--hijack--
Chefguy--you're absolutely right. I'm one of those nasty-stinkin' reservist jarheads. But when they do call on us, we get the job done. Then we go home and get fat and nasty again.
CHEFGUY----------
You forgot "hooligan's navy' and "left handed sailors" for the coast guard,

Broad assed Marines for the gals.

Grunts for the infantry
.
Lifers for the regulars.

Andf Bellhops for the gyrenes.

Just to point out a few.

From a "Big Deuce"Gyrene
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  #6  
Old 01-25-2004, 11:33 AM
UncleBill UncleBill is offline
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Interestingly enough, I believe it is the Associatied Press Stylebook that USED to say one should always capitalize "Marine" when writing about the individual person in uniform. Not so with "airman", "soldier", or "sailor".

"He is a Marine."
"He is a sailor."

etc...

But in 1994 the Secretary of the Navy declared "Sailor" was to be capitalized, also. I do not know if the AP has revised their guidelines since then. The online version requires membership.

UncleBill
Marine
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  #7  
Old 01-25-2004, 12:02 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ezstrete
CHEFGUY----------
You forgot "hooligan's navy' and "left handed sailors" for the coast guard,

Broad assed Marines for the gals.

Grunts for the infantry
.
Lifers for the regulars.

Andf Bellhops for the gyrenes.

Just to point out a few.

From a "Big Deuce"Gyrene
And let's not forget the oft-scorned REMFs of any service.
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  #8  
Old 01-25-2004, 03:03 PM
levdrakon levdrakon is offline
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I'd add wingnut for Airmen. Weren't Army guys sometimes called bulletcatchers? Or was that just the front line troops?

Also, I was under the impression that in general, you can call anyone soldier if soldiering is what they're doing.
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  #9  
Old 01-25-2004, 04:37 PM
David Simmons David Simmons is offline
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When I was one of the "Army's pampered-darling flyboys" in WWII, our terms for pretty much everyone else was either "poor sonsabitches" or "jealous bastards."
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  #10  
Old 01-25-2004, 04:43 PM
Mister Rik Mister Rik is offline
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Remember that a Marine is called a Marine because "Marine" was originally (and still is, to a large degree) a specific type of soldier: one who fights from ships. That's why the Marine Corps began as a division of the Navy.

If you watch a movie of old sailing ship naval combat, you'll notice that in addition to cannon, there were also men with rifles shooting back and forth at each other. Those were the Marines. The sailors of the Navy were responsible for, well, sailing the ship, running the ship, and handling the cannon. So responsibility in combat was sort of like this: the sailor's primary target was the enemy ship; the Marine's primary target was the enemy crew.

In other words, while the sailors on the enemy ship were busy trying to sink your ship, your Marines would try to shoot them. You know, shoot the helmsman, shoot the guys handling the sails, shoot the guys at the cannons. Heck, shoot their Captain. For the most part, this was for the purpose of making the enemy's job more difficult.

Also, if your Captain wished to capture the other ship, rather than sink it, it was the Marines who would board and attempt to take the other ship. And the enemy's own Marines would try to stop them.

So it boils down to the fact that fighting on board a ship required different training and skills than fighting on the ground. Hence, the need for a special type of soldier: The Marine Soldier.

All this also explains why sailors sometimes refer to Marines as "bullet stoppers".

I just remembered - a computer game called Escape Velocity: Nova has a feature where you can hire a platoon of Marines for your spaceship. The purpose of the Marines is to help increase your chances of capturing other ships.
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  #11  
Old 01-25-2004, 04:56 PM
Manduck Manduck is online now
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I think you're supposed to call them Army Guys.
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  #12  
Old 01-25-2004, 05:50 PM
ccwaterback ccwaterback is offline
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Isn't it common to call an Army soldier a G-I?
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  #13  
Old 01-25-2004, 08:02 PM
moriah moriah is offline
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So, what's the generic name for any one in any of the branches of military service that's not sexist or awkward? Service member? Fighter? Militarian?

Peace.
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  #14  
Old 01-25-2004, 09:53 PM
Spavined Gelding Spavined Gelding is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phase42
The sailors of the Navy were responsible for, well, sailing the ship, running the ship, and handling the cannon. So responsibility in combat was sort of like this: the sailor's primary target was the enemy ship; the Marine's primary target was the enemy crew.
A slight quibble. Historically the Marine's primary target was the crew of his own ship. It was the Marine detachment on ship that was responsible for protecting the officers, the booze, and the magazines from the under-fed, over worked, half drunk sailors, most of whom in the old British service were involuntarily serving by virtue a very crude and brutal conscription system. A Marine sentry guarded the Captain's quarters. Marines guarded the wardroom, the magazine and the liquor. The platform projecting from the bow of sailing men-of-war was called the Marine walk--it is where a Marine stood guard to shoot anyone who attempted to jump ship my sliding down the anchor rope. While Marines were on the watch bill for general quarters with some assigned as gun crew and some as sharp shooters in the fighting tops and some on deck, they were still the officers's little police force to keep the crew in order and suppress mutiny.
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  #15  
Old 01-25-2004, 10:42 PM
kniz kniz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phase42
That's why the Marine Corps began as a division of the Navy.
Ask any Marine and he'll tell you that the Marine Corps is older than the Navy.
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  #16  
Old 01-26-2004, 01:04 AM
levdrakon levdrakon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moriah
So, what's the generic name for any one in any of the branches of military service that's not sexist or awkward? Service member? Fighter? Militarian?

Peace.
Soldier.

Say it proud.
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  #17  
Old 01-26-2004, 02:35 AM
Paul in Qatar Paul in Qatar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moriah
So, what's the generic name for any one in any of the branches of military service that's not sexist or awkward? Service member? Fighter? Militarian?
A good question with no real answer in modern English. I like 'Warrior.'
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  #18  
Old 01-26-2004, 03:03 AM
Bromley Bromley is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul in Saudi
A good question with no real answer in modern English. I like 'Warrior.'
What's wrong with "Soldier"? Am I missing something obvious?
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  #19  
Old 01-26-2004, 06:45 AM
UncleBill UncleBill is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bromley
What's wrong with "Soldier"? Am I missing something obvious?
Yes, the incredibly effective brainwashing the Marines undergo makes them (us) bristle at being called a "Soldier".

"There are 150,000 U.S. troops in Iraq" is OK by me, even if there are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines in country. But do not call a Marine a "Troop" or "Trooper".

It's complex. The DI's at Parris Island will teach it to you in about 11 weeks.
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  #20  
Old 01-26-2004, 08:00 AM
SkeptiJess SkeptiJess is offline
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I was in the Navy and I bristle a bit at being called a "soldier" even in the generic sense. I was a sailor, not a soldier. When speaking generally I use "armed forces" or "military" or "service members." I would never use "soldier" as an umbrella term.
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  #21  
Old 01-26-2004, 08:52 AM
whiterabbit whiterabbit is offline
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I hear "soldier" and I assume you're in the army. I can assure you that some random airman (such as my brother), let alone Marine, would NOT like that assumption.

"Service member" or "in the military" are a bit clumsy, but better than applying one service's term across the board, what with all the mostly-friendly rivalry between them.
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  #22  
Old 01-26-2004, 11:17 AM
QuizCustodet QuizCustodet is offline
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Serviceman/woman does seem to be the generic term (insofar as there is one!). For your interest and fighting ignorance, in the British Army things get a bit more complicated than this, mostly due to regimental traditions. Thus, a member of the Royal Engineers is generically referred to not as a soldier, or even as an engineer, but as a Sapper; members of the Rifle Brigade are 'Riflemen'; other titles include Craftsman, Fusilier, Trooper, and Gunner (for my own regiment, the Royal Artillery).

The generic term for a group comprising members of many different regiments remains soldier, though.
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  #23  
Old 01-26-2004, 05:00 PM
levdrakon levdrakon is offline
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I never really liked being called a "service member" or referring to "service members" in general. I'm just childish enough to immediately visualize a large formation of penises, all standing at attention.

If you don't like "soldier," then "service men and women" is good. "Service men and service women" seems a bit lengthy, and "service people" or "service persons" seems too PC for me.
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  #24  
Old 01-26-2004, 07:03 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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I was a U.S. Navy Seabee (Naval Construction Force), and as such we were neither fish nor fowl (so to speak). "Squid" didn't apply and I never really heard any cute interservice name for us. Usually, it was just "fuckin' Seabees", usually said with either a tone of admiration or a sigh of disgust.
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