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  #1  
Old 03-22-2004, 10:23 PM
Laughing Lagomorph Laughing Lagomorph is offline
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Four year old waking up with leg pain?

What could be causing an otherwise healthy four year old child to wake up howling in agony with leg pain? It has been happening sporadically over the last two months or so, maybe a total of four nights in that span. The Little Lagomorph goes to bed as usual, everything is fine, then he wakes up an hour or two later howling. The first couple of times we couldn't guess what was wrong and he couldn't tell us. Finally we figured out his leg was hurting, maybe both. The pain seems to be coming from the shin/calf/ankle area but he is not coherent enough at these times to even answer questions. Ibuprofen seems to help then he finally falls asleep again. In the morning everything is normal.

There is nothing visibly wrong with his legs, no bruises or anything. He isn't limping or complaining of pain during the day. He is a normal active kid.

My wife has an appointment scheduled with the pediatrician on Thursday to discuss this but I was wondering if anyone else had any ideas or similar experiences? It just happened again tonight and frankly it leaves Mrs. Lagomorph and I a little frazzled. In fact she might be moving the appointment up if possible.
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  #2  
Old 03-22-2004, 10:28 PM
Tuckerfan Tuckerfan is offline
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You might try giving the wee one calcium suppliments. For some strange reason, I've found that if I'm not getting enough calcium I get leg cramps like you wouldn't believe. It's worth a shot, and since most kids don't get enough calcium these days, it couldn't hurt.
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Old 03-22-2004, 10:32 PM
asterion asterion is offline
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I agree on checking his mineral intakes. I've found I have more leg cramps when I'm running low on ions, especially calcium and potassium. You probably don't even have to go with supplements; just let the kid eat more cheese and drink milk (calcium, mostly) and eat bananas (potassium) and so on. Of course, if it continues (or you're thinking about supplements) go to a doctor.
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Old 03-22-2004, 10:34 PM
David Simmons David Simmons is offline
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I remember having "leg ache" as a youngster. They are often referred to as "growing pains" and as I understand it are often a symptom of a spurt of rapid growth.

I searched "children leg ache" and found a few sites.

Probably not serious but definitely don't put off following through with the pediatrician appointment.
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Old 03-22-2004, 10:53 PM
InternetLegend InternetLegend is offline
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My younger daughter had leg pain like this when she was 4-5 years old. Our pediatrician couldn't find anything wrong with her. We settled for giving her daily vitamins with mineral supplements in them (the ones formulated for kids, of course) and we gave her Tylenol or ibuprofen when she woke up in pain. I always found it interesting that she seemed to calm down and go back to sleep almost immediately after taking a pill, even though there was no way it could have started working that quickly. I don't doubt that she was truly in pain, though, because it woke her out of a sound sleep.

I'm still not sure what exactly caused the pains or why they went away. She had occasional bouts of pain when she was a little older, too, but I suspect they were garden-variety muscle aches or pain from standard variety bumps and bruises.
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Old 03-22-2004, 11:01 PM
ftg ftg is offline
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Note: This is just my personal case. YMMV.

I had them bad when I was a kid. Actually went away during the big teen growth years. But still get them on occasion. I tried various things but as a child the only thing that helped was heat on the shins. I was diagnosed with "tight tendons". (Still have them.) I tried to stretch the tendons by pointing the toe down. After all, the pain was on the front of the shins. After many years, I realized the pain is caused by tight calf muscles, so stretching them works like a charm. If I had only known this when I was a kid...

In my case, Calcium supplements makes things worse.
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  #7  
Old 03-22-2004, 11:09 PM
TellMeI'mNotCrazy TellMeI'mNotCrazy is offline
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I also had the most horrible leg pain ("growing pains") when I was a child. My son had them as well, when he was about 5 or so. The poor kid would wake up just in agony. Good that you're going to see a doctor to rule out anything more serious, but I suspect you'll find that it's just "one of those things".

As the victim and a parent of a victim of the horrendous pains, my thoughts are with you and your boy
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Old 03-23-2004, 03:21 AM
fluiddruid fluiddruid is offline
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I have this problem. Basically, I'll wake up in agony. My calf -- and to my recollection, it's always the right one -- will be completely tense and rigid, much more so than I can willingly do. If you point your foot and tense up your calf, you'll get a slight uncomfortable feeling. Keep doing it and it gets worse. Multiply that feeling tens of times over to the point of being bad enough to nearly scream uncontrollably, and that's what it feels like. Yes, I have started screaming, but now that I've had it happen many times I can usually bite my lip and get by with only whispering panicked obscenities.

The only thing I've found that works is to rub the calf and massage it loose. This hurts like nothing else, but it will finally release. Then, be very careful not to tense it and relax.

Usually this is connected to potassium intake and exercise. A lot of activity without eating a banana or two and I'll be in agony the night after with about 75% certainty. I've had it only a few times in my adult years, and it has either been a time of poor diet or exceptional exertion, and usually both put together.

Since taking vitamins, it's never happened. Could be a coincidence, but I tend to get slight (much lower intensity) side cramps during moderate exercise where the potassium intake definitely helps, and I've noticed corrolation.
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  #9  
Old 03-23-2004, 04:53 AM
Seven Seven is offline
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This is an oddly timed thread. Three nights ago I woke up with insane leg pain, the mother of all cramps, right in my left calf. I couldn't touch the calf for at least 15 minutes because it hurt so bad. I did manage to get to sleep an hour later, but I still had the pain when I woke up.

The next day I tried rubbing it loose, my wife tried working on it, I put heat on it, cold on it,. nothing really seemed to help. This nasty knot just wouldn't let go.

I asked a friend of mine who is in massage school what I should do. He said do not rub it! Instead I should stretch the calf by either:

1) laying on my back and have someone push on the top of my foot (like they're making me point my toes) while I resist

2) Keep my knee straight while I lean forward on the foot (causing my toes to angle towards my knee,. if that makes any sence)

So, last night I did just that. Today I woke up with very slight pain. I don't feel it walking around but it still hurts a bit to the touch -which is a million times better then before I did the stretches.

While I don't know what's up with Little Lagomorph, but you might want to have him stretch the calf before bedtime. You could make a game out of it (hold his feet while he resists)

If you try it I'd be interested to know if it works or not.
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  #10  
Old 03-23-2004, 05:20 AM
Mops Mops is offline
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Does it help him to stand on the leg that hurts?
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  #11  
Old 03-23-2004, 06:47 AM
Earthworm Jim Earthworm Jim is offline
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Another "It used to happen to me" response - for reasons unknown, I would get very bad cramps in my calfs (calves?). I still get them on rare occasions. I found the best way for dealing with them is to pull my foot back as far as I can. IE, if I were sitting in bed with my leg extended, I'd grab my foot by the toes and try to point it at the ceiling. Basically, I'd stretch the calf as much as I could.

Hope this helps.
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  #12  
Old 03-23-2004, 06:50 AM
TellMeI'mNotCrazy TellMeI'mNotCrazy is offline
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Just to clarify my pain (and my sons as far as I could tell) was in the thigh/shin/ankle area - it felt as if my bones were hurting. Not at all like a Charley horse, which I used to also get when I was pregnant.
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  #13  
Old 03-23-2004, 07:26 AM
Laughing Lagomorph Laughing Lagomorph is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tschild
Does it help him to stand on the leg that hurts?
I'm not sure. Usually at these times he is unable to communicate coherently, and can barely follow our directions ("Please point to where it hurts! Mommy and Daddy don't know!"). I noticed that last about 5 minutes after he woke up that he was able to stand up without apparent discomfort. Part of the problem is that he is also so tired at these times that he desperately wants to go back to bed.

Thanks for all your input. I see though that there seems to be a range of experience (rub, don't rub, stretch, flex, calcium makes it better, calcium makes it worse!). We started giving him his children's vitamin again today...we had stopped for a while but he could probably use it anyway.

We are going to the doctor for just this reason on Thursday but I am not too hopeful that they will determine the cause...my experience with primary care pediatricians is that they are not very good at determining the cause of unusual symptoms (believe me, I could write a book but that is a whole other subject). If anything definitive comes out of it I will report back here.
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Old 03-23-2004, 07:49 AM
Girl Next Door Girl Next Door is offline
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My kids had the same exact thing. Pain on the shin, woke them up in the middle of the night, Tylenol helping right away. Often I would get some lotion and massage the area for them, and that seemed to calm them down. They pretty much just outgrew it. Good luck!
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  #15  
Old 03-23-2004, 08:01 AM
Skammer Skammer is offline
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Childhood memories... rushing back...

I remember the awful pain. Not a muscle ache/charlie horse kind of thing, but pain in the shin/knee area (the front of the leg). I would wake up crying from the pain and my parents didn't know what to do about it.

If I remember correctly (it was, like, 30 years ago), my mother would rub Ben-Gay on my legs and eventually I would fall asleep again. Eventually they stopped; I guess I just outgrew them.
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Old 03-23-2004, 10:43 AM
AngelicGemma AngelicGemma is offline
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My parents just blamed it on "growing pains." Like others have suggested this is probally the case for your son.
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  #17  
Old 03-23-2004, 11:41 AM
beajerry beajerry is offline
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Glad you've made a pediatric appointment.
One consideration, though slight, is a urinary tract infection which can manifest symptoms much like you describe.
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  #18  
Old 03-23-2004, 12:39 PM
Mr. Moto Mr. Moto is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laughing Lagomorph
We are going to the doctor for just this reason on Thursday but I am not too hopeful that they will determine the cause...my experience with primary care pediatricians is that they are not very good at determining the cause of unusual symptoms (believe me, I could write a book but that is a whole other subject). If anything definitive comes out of it I will report back here.
If this thread showed anything, it is that it's hardly an unusual symptom.

I'm sure your boy will be fine. Keeping my fingers crossed.
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  #19  
Old 03-23-2004, 08:30 PM
mischievous mischievous is offline
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You can probably figure out whether it's a cramp-type pain or not by simply feeling his legs. Cramped muscles are hard to the touch. If it is growing pains, where the bones hurt, the muscles will be loose and relaxed.

I used to have terrible growing pains. Standing on the hurting legs helped a little, but didn't let me get back to sleep.

mischievous
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Old 03-23-2004, 08:44 PM
Chotii Chotii is offline
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Sounds like growing pains. All 3 of my kids have had them around 4-5, to a greater or lesser degree. The pain always manifests in the tibia, just below the knee (at a growth plate) and I remember this pain from my own childhood.

For my daughters, there is a homeopathic remedy (option 1), Tylenol or Motrin (option 2) and the good old heat treatment (option 3) - a hot water bottle, or some dry white rice in a cotton sock, microwaved until warm but not hot enough to burn (usually 1 minute in my microwave oven). We like the 'rice pack' best because it molds to the leg and the heat lasts at least a half hour. We try the hot pack first.

I certainly wouldn't discourage the doctor's visit, but in the meantime, try the hot pack. It's easy, fast, reusable, and appears to give immediate and blessed relief.
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Old 03-23-2004, 08:55 PM
I Love Me, Vol. I I Love Me, Vol. I is offline
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I can't believe all the people who have gone through these weird leg pains! I thought I was just a freak when I had them pretty bad on and off when I was little.

My mother or father would sit down and put all their weight on my calfs/knees and that would usually help out after a few minutes.

Man-- for all those "growing pains" I had--- I sure didn't grow that much (I'm 5'9").
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Old 03-23-2004, 09:54 PM
ftg ftg is offline
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I seriously, very seriously doubt that these are "growing pains".

I had them the worst when I was a kid when I was growing the least. They went away during my real growth spurt. I still get them ocassionally and I am certainly not growing now!

4 year olds are highly unlikely to have "growing pains".
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Old 03-23-2004, 10:31 PM
Qwisp Qwisp is offline
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My daughter had the same thing, starting when she was three.The doctor diagnosed them as growing pains.She had them until she was about 8 or 9. Four years old is not to young to have growing pains ftg,still it is a great idea to see the doctor.You can see just from the responses here that leg pain is a really common thing in young children
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  #24  
Old 03-23-2004, 10:42 PM
CrankyAsAnOldMan CrankyAsAnOldMan is offline
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It's very comforting to hear so many people have had experience with this sort of pain as children or with their own children.

However, I regretfully have to temper some posters even though their anecdotes are so well-meaning. Just for future reference, adult pain that is normal/common/non-serious is not necessarily assurance that a child's pain in the same area is normal. Back pain is one example. Back pain in adults can be many innocuous things--lifted something wrong, slept weird, etc. Back pain in small children is rare (amazing, isn't it, given the ways they sleep!?!) and requires a checkup with a doc.

Laughing, it sounds like you're on target having it looked at at the next appointment. Sounds like it's not too uncommon in other kids. Sending good thoughts your way.
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Old 03-24-2004, 02:34 AM
Chotii Chotii is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ftg
I seriously, very seriously doubt that these are "growing pains"...4 year olds are highly unlikely to have "growing pains".
FTG, do you have any children? Will you retract this if you ever have children, and they have ungodly pain in their legs at the age of 3, 4 or 5 that wakes them (and you) wailing and shrieking, and you go to your doctor and the doctor says "It's just growing pains"?

Which btw is exactly what my daughter's doctor said when we took the kid in for the very same problem: waking shrieking at night, screaming that her leg hurt. Always the same leg. Always the same place. This would be about the same time she grew an inch taller than her twin.

The doctor recommended Tylenol.
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  #26  
Old 03-24-2004, 05:11 AM
AngelicGemma AngelicGemma is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I Love Me, Vol. I
Man-- for all those "growing pains" I had--- I sure didn't grow that much (I'm 5'9").
You did better then me, I'm 5'2"!
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Old 03-24-2004, 05:59 AM
mischievous mischievous is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ftg
I had them the worst when I was a kid when I was growing the least. They went away during my real growth spurt.
Some people think that this type of pain occurs when bone is growing unevenly (i.e. one side faster than the other side) rather than quickly. Uneven bone growth would cause distortion and compression of the bone, resulting in pain until it evens out. This could occur during fast or slow growth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ftg
I still get them ocassionally and I am certainly not growing now!
Bone does grow in adults, largely in response to physical stresses. If you start to work out, or even just walk farther in one day than you normally do, your bones respond by beefing up overall density and enlarging the contact points that your muscles attach to. If you revert to lower activity levels, it all goes away. Bones are actually fairly dynamic.

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Old 03-24-2004, 06:14 AM
Laughing Lagomorph Laughing Lagomorph is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Moto
If this thread showed anything, it is that it's hardly an unusual symptom.
...
Neither is colic type symptoms in an infant, but our primary care physicians were no help at all there. We had a child who wasn't gaining weight, never slept for more than a couple of hours at a stretch even at six months, regurgitated constantly and spent a good bit of his waking hours screaming and writhing in agony.

The primary care pediatricians would say "It's colic. Go home."

It required two emergency room hospitalizations and a consultation by the attending gastroenterologist at Children's Hospital in Boston (My hero!: "We're not letting you leave here until we figure out what is causing this!") to diagnose colitis caused by sensitivity to dairy. Two weeks of a modified diet and my son was sleeping for hours at a stretch, and putting on weight.

Maybe "unusual" isn't the right word, "mysterious" maybe? "Unexplained"?



mischievous thanks for the tip on the cramped muscles, I never thought of that.
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Old 03-24-2004, 06:45 AM
norinew norinew is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by CrankyAsAnOldMan
However, I regretfully have to temper some posters even though their anecdotes are so well-meaning. Just for future reference, adult pain that is normal/common/non-serious is not necessarily assurance that a child's pain in the same area is normal.
I don't think anyone here is saying for Laughing not to take the Little Lagomorph to the doctor. I think they're just saying "this is pretty common, and in all likelihood it's nothing serious, and here are some things you can try until the doctors' appointment". In that vein. . .I have a 12-year-old who, from about age 3 until probably about 2 or 3 years ago, would wake up with terrible leg pain in the night. Doctor said it was growing pains. We gave her Tylenol, and that would help enough to get her back to sleep.
Quote:
Originally posted by I Love Me Vol I
Man-- for all those "growing pains" I had--- I sure didn't grow that much (I'm 5'9").
Yes, but presumably you're quite a bit taller than you were at age four, no?
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Old 03-24-2004, 08:40 AM
CrankyAsAnOldMan CrankyAsAnOldMan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by norinew
I don't think anyone here is saying for Laughing not to take the Little Lagomorph to the doctor. I think they're just saying "this is pretty common, and in all likelihood it's nothing serious, and here are some things you can try until the doctors' appointment". In that vein. . .I have a 12-year-old who, from about age 3 until probably about 2 or 3 years ago, would wake up with terrible leg pain in the night. Doctor said it was growing pains. We gave her Tylenol, and that would help enough to get her back to sleep.
To clarify (and hopefully nor belabor) the point, comments like yours were genuinely helpful because you shared anecdotes about children, not adults, who have had similar pain.

My concern, maybe not just for Lagomorph but for other parents who are reading (and for posters in this thread who like to give helpful advice to parents by giving off the cuff examples), is that you can't apply adult anecdotes to children's bodies, even for stuff that seems straightforward. Unless I read them wrong, at least a few posters said, in essence, "Yeah, I (an adult or teen) get that and it's normal."

The fact that normal adult gripes like backaches and headaches aren't normal kid things was news to me when my son had some body pain, and I'm just being (perhaps overly) cautious in passing it along. I probably am coming off as a ninny. You're right that Lagamorph isn't going to decide to not ask the doc about it.
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Old 03-24-2004, 09:04 AM
norinew norinew is offline
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Cranky, Okay, now I see your concern. It's a good point. Having said that, you are being a ninny, but that's okay; we're used to that from you
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  #32  
Old 03-24-2004, 10:24 AM
David Simmons David Simmons is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mischievous
Bone does grow in adults, largely in response to physical stresses. If you start to work out, or even just walk farther in one day than you normally do, your bones respond by beefing up overall density and enlarging the contact points that your muscles attach to. If you revert to lower activity levels, it all goes away. Bones are actually fairly dynamic.

mischievous
This is sort of off topic, but yes bone does grow. A TV show I saw about 20 years ago addressed this subject, among others.

An X-ray examination of LA Dodgers pitcher Don Sutton (I think) showed that the bones in his pitching arm were quite a bit larger in diameter than the bones in the other arm.
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Old 03-25-2004, 09:17 PM
Laughing Lagomorph Laughing Lagomorph is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chotii
FTG, do you have any children? Will you retract this if you ever have children, and they have ungodly pain in their legs at the age of 3, 4 or 5 that wakes them (and you) wailing and shrieking, and you go to your doctor and the doctor says "It's just growing pains"?

Which btw is exactly what my daughter's doctor said when we took the kid in for the very same problem: waking shrieking at night, screaming that her leg hurt. Always the same leg. Always the same place. This would be about the same time she grew an inch taller than her twin.

The doctor recommended Tylenol.
Just wanted to update everyone...our experience with the doctor turned out to be the same as
Chotii described above. The doc said "growing pains" (which I think is a medical term meaning "I honestly don't know") and recommended ibuprofen.

I sure as hell hope this doesn't continue for nine years like it did for norinew.

Interestingly the Little Lagomorph is now close to the 50th percentile for height for his age, where he used to be down around the 5th percentile a few years back.

Hmmmm.........
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  #34  
Old 03-26-2004, 12:35 AM
Chotii Chotii is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laughing Lagomorph
Just wanted to update everyone...our experience with the doctor turned out to be the same as
Chotii described above. The doc said "growing pains" (which I think is a medical term meaning "I honestly don't know") and recommended ibuprofen.
I do highly recommend the 'rice pack' honestly. I get very nervous about giving the kids some sort of medicine for every ache and pain, even when it's a legitimate ache and pain. When other things work (like a hot pack), it sends the message that it's possible to address discomforts and unhappinesses with other things than drugs.
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  #35  
Old 03-26-2004, 01:51 AM
Garfield226 Garfield226 is offline
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I have had these my whole life (I'm 20). Ever since I can remember, I've occasionally had such bad pain in my right thigh that I could hardly bear to stand or walk. It, like TellMeI'mNotCrazy's pain felt sort of like it was in the bone itself. I went to the doctor a few times for it, and they never could figure it out.

Recently, and very likely unrelated but not altogether impossible, I was experiencing severe pain in my left hip, had it MRI'ed, and was diagnosed with two bulging and arthritic discs in my lower back.

Not to use scare tactics or anything, and I'm still waiting to hear the specifics of that diagnosis, but it makes sense to me...
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  #36  
Old 03-26-2004, 02:37 AM
aldiboronti aldiboronti is offline
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Our eight-year old daughter has suffered with these leg pains for the last three years. The attacks are sporadic, sometimes she'll go a month or two with no problem, other times she'll have two or three attacks a week.

They always occur at night, no problems at all by day. We've taken her to the doctor a few times and she told us that the trouble has all the indicators of 'growing pains': pain only occurs at night, no swelling or redness of the legs, pain lasts at the most five or ten minutes, relieved by massage.

Checking on the net, this seems to be a not uncommon complaint in young children.
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  #37  
Old 03-26-2004, 06:32 AM
norinew norinew is offline
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[quote]Originally posted by Laughing Lagamorph
I sure as hell hope this doesn't continue for nine years like it did for norinew. [quote]
It might last for years, but it got easier as she got older. For one thing, it was sporadic; not like she was waking us up every night. For another thing, she got old enough to help us deal with it. She would come into our room and ask for her Tylenol, doses of which we began keeping in our room. That way, she could take the Tylenol and go right back to bed, without one of us having to get up with her.

chotii's rice packs sound good, too. I can remember my mom doing something similar for ear aches where we were little, but she put salt in the sock, not rice. Same idea, though.
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  #38  
Old 03-26-2004, 12:14 PM
ftg ftg is offline
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C'mon folks, read the post before you start complaining.

In particular, Chotii: What is your problem??????? I was that 4 year old in agonizing pain at night! Read my post!

If you are a reasonable person, I will be expecting an apology from you!

Doctor's don't know a lot of stuff. Saying "growing pains" is just a brush off expression. It could be a lot of things. In my case, I got an accurate diagnosis of tight tendons. Other people might have problems with calcium, or dozens of other real conditions.
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  #39  
Old 03-26-2004, 01:26 PM
mischievous mischievous is offline
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Um, ftg, I read your posts. You said, if I may paraphrase:

(1) You had leg pain as a child. It was misdiagnosed as growing pains, but turned out to be tight tendons.

Fair enough, but many, many other people have come in to say that they had growing pains as children, and the symptoms were very similar to those reported by Lagomorph.

(2) Despite the above reports, you don't think it likely that four year olds get growing pains.

So all the other Dopers are making it up?

(3) Your reasoning for this is that your pain did not coincide with your growth spurt, and still continues as an adult.

Well, as I and other Dopers pointed out, bone growth happens at odd times and continues during adulthood. Besides, if your pain was not growing pains - but instead tight tendons - then there is no reason for it to happen only during growth periods.

I'm glad you posted an alternative diagnosis - knowing the possiblities helps others to ask the right questions when seeing a doctor. However, the bulk of the evidence suggests that children do get growing pains and sometimes parents just have to deal with them. Your reasoning that Lagomorph's child does not have growing pains seems limited to the fact that you did not - and the inference that such things do not exist. I don't think that Chotii was out of line for getting a bit frustrated, although she might have phrased it more tactfully.

Like I said, it's good to know that there are other possible causes, but if it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck, and the doctor says it's a duck, then I'm voting for growing pains.

mischievous
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  #40  
Old 03-26-2004, 08:47 PM
ftg ftg is offline
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Virtually all small children undergo really amazing growth. Many people forget this and just think of teenagers.

But ...

Only a small number will experience the pain described in the OP.

Ergo, if "growing pains" is such a medically sound diagnosis, then why don't virtually all children experience them???????

I think that's an awfully darn important thing to remember.

"Growing pains" especially for that age and for adults is a throw away expression. If that's what the doctor tells you, go see another doctor instead. There is probably a real medical condition underlying this that must and should be treated. I have yet to hear anyone suggest a treatment for "growing pains" other than "ignore the kid's pain for a few years".

Note that last phrase: That's the exact opposite of my view and yet somehow some "people" decided that was my view. Sheesh and then some.

I am still awaiting an apology. No question about it.

Now we have mischievous telling me what I didn't say. No one ever diagnosed me with "growing pains". No one. The doctor diagnosed tight tendons.

C'mon folks, read the posts! It'll save a lot of "pain".
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  #41  
Old 03-26-2004, 09:33 PM
Laughing Lagomorph Laughing Lagomorph is offline
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I have to say I agree with much of what ftg is saying about "growing pains" as a medically sound diagnosis. How does it go?...just because the doctor has a name for what is bothering you doesn't mean he knows what it is!". Let's just say I am dubious and I am going to do more research.



Chotii the rice pack does sound like a good idea, I didn't want you to get the impression I was dismissing it or something similar in favor of medication. I agree that as parents we should be very selective about giving our children any sort of drug. I just have a feeling that my son isn't going to let us put some strange object on his leg when it is hurting like that...he barely lets us touch his leg at these times and he is very strong willed!
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  #42  
Old 03-27-2004, 05:19 AM
mischievous mischievous is offline
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ftg, if I start addressing your posts point-by-point I think this thread is going to turn hostile, which really isn't helpful to anyone. I will admit to having made the unwarranted assumption that you had been misdiagnosed, because you seem to be complaining that doctors are quick to misdiagnose leg pain. If the first contact you had with a doctor regarding this issue resulted in the correct diagnosis, I'm not sure where you get this impression.

I'm the last person to say that doctors always diagnose correctly, but I don't understand your conviction that what are commonly considered growing pains usually represent an ignored pathology. It doesn't surprise me that occurance, frequency, and severity of pain would vary between children - people are awfully different. Maybe growing pains are affected by the evenness of bone growth, or the degree of calcification of the bone, or whether a nerve happens to be near the growth plate... or any other natural human variance. Furthermore, growing pains generally go away of their own accord - while untreated medical conditions normally do not.

I certainly would encourage anyone, inlcuding Lagomorph, who feels that their child's diagnosis is a "throw away" diagnosis to get a second opinion. If you don't think your doctor considered all the real possibilities, then s/he's not doing his/her job. And I would certainly discuss appropriate pain management with the doctor, there is no reason to ignore severe and ongoing pain.

So my question for ftg is: given that numerous people in this thread recieved apparently correct diagnoses of "growing pains", and that your own initial diagnosis was also correct (i.e. tight tendons), do you have any evidence to support your assertion that most diagnoses of "growing pains" are throw-away diagnoses by lazy doctors ignoring underlying medical conditions? Other than your apparent disbelief is the possibility of growing pains, is there anything to suggest that the commonly-experienced transient leg pain in children is really something (or somethings) else?

mischievous
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  #43  
Old 03-27-2004, 05:25 AM
Aeschines Aeschines is offline
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I used to get the same horrible leg pains when I was a kid. No fun!
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  #44  
Old 06-10-2006, 05:21 PM
Laughing Lagomorph Laughing Lagomorph is offline
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Yes, I am reviving an old thread. But 1) I started it originally and 2) I have factual information to add.

My son, the Little Lagomorph described in the OP on Friday saw an orthopedist at Children's Hospital in Boston for this sporadic leg pain. He diagnosed "Anteversion-Met Adductus" and prescribed orthotics and physical therapy. So it looks like after 2 years we finally have both an answer to the mystery and I hope a solution to the problem.

My son is fine otherwise, growing well and quite active and healthy otherwise. I was reviewing this thread and realized it had a lot of participation by people who were still active here so I wanted to let people know, if they cared, how things turned out. Thanks all.
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