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  #1  
Old 05-19-2000, 09:32 PM
Hail Ants Hail Ants is offline
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Okay I know what a Pound is, but do these mean the same thing:

Quid
Shilling
Guinea
Crown
Bob

I remember reading that Australia switched from an Imperial monetary system to decimal around 1968 or so. Is Britain's system 100 whatevers to the pound?
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  #2  
Old 05-19-2000, 09:46 PM
aseymayo aseymayo is offline
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The British system used to be based on 240 pennies to the pound (quid). They went to a decimal system in 1971. Here's a handy chart of names and values.
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  #3  
Old 05-20-2000, 06:59 AM
Crusoe Crusoe is offline
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Decimalisation occurred in Britain in (I think) 1973. It's now 100 new pence (more commonly just "pence") to the pound Sterling.
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  #4  
Old 05-20-2000, 07:33 AM
Gilligan Gilligan is offline
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On a related note, I can recall watching various British comedies and occasionally seeing prices listed as "4/6" or spoken as "four and six". Similar to "a dollar fifty" in U.S. terms. What do the four and six stand for? Four pounds plus six shillings or pence, or four shillings plus six pence?
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  #5  
Old 05-20-2000, 08:54 AM
London_Calling London_Calling is offline
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Hail Ants - You don't really need to know about all the old terminology. Only things that matter are:
A 'quid' is a £ (pound)

There are 100 'pence' (pennies)in a £

Every £ you spend is roughly equal to $1.55/$1.60, or

A $ is roughly equal to 65-70 pence

Don't ask about Euro's unless you have to !

BTW: (i think...it was 1973!)
A shilling equals 5 pence
A Guinea equals 21 shillings/£1.10 pence
A Crown equals 2 shillings/10 pence
A bob is a shilling

err...hope that's clear.
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  #6  
Old 05-20-2000, 08:56 AM
London_Calling London_Calling is offline
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Opps, a Guinea equals 21 shillings/£1.05 pence.
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  #7  
Old 05-20-2000, 12:02 PM
Diceman Diceman is offline
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Thanks, aseymayo, your link is very enlightening. I remember an old text adventure game that I found on an archive sight. It was pretty good, except that I had to buy things with bizzare alien coinages like "Florins" and
"Half-Crowns."
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  #8  
Old 05-20-2000, 01:07 PM
C K Dexter Haven C K Dexter Haven is offline
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London_c says: << You don't really need to know about all the old terminology >>

Not unless you happen to be reading a book, or watching a movie or tv show, from before 1970, say.
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  #9  
Old 05-20-2000, 02:17 PM
London_Calling London_Calling is offline
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CK, I guess you're right - i assumed incorrectly that Hail Ants was carrying out a little pre-tourism research.

Got to say, I didn't know for years the respective value's of dimes, nickels, quarters, etc and it was a little frustrating.
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  #10  
Old 05-20-2000, 03:06 PM
aseymayo aseymayo is offline
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The American-British - British-American Dictionary has some more in-depth information about old and new British money. Warning - this site uses (ugh) frames; click on the British->American link in the "Search Instructions" frame, then scroll down to the pound symbol (it's near the top).

The author of the above site says the move to decimalization began in 1968 (another site I found said Queen Elizabeth herself struck the first decimal coins in '68) and the conversion was completed by the official start date of Feb 15, 1971. He also explains the L/d/s designations (for Gilligan).
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  #11  
Old 05-20-2000, 10:28 PM
Kipper Kipper is offline
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In the old, predecimal system:

1 pound = 20 shillings

1 shilling = 12 pence

Pounds can be refered to as Quid or Reddies (pound notes used to be colored red but now are replaced by coins).

2/6 means two shillings and six pence and is refered to as half a bob or a half crown. A crown was a five shilling piece or one bob. The smallest paper currency was the 10 shilling note.

A guinea was a gold coin worth 21 shillings or slightly more than one pound.

Pennies are abreviated as p but some times you will see them refered to by the abreviation d, for example on old stamps. The d stands for denarius from the latin for penny.

As a note of interest pennies were in medieval times minted from silver. 24O pennies weighed one pound hence the name pound and the expression pound stirling (stirling silver) for the British currency.

The move to decimicialtion was officially in 1971 athough there was a transitional period. Now one pound = 100 pennies which were refered to as "New Pence" although now one now need this explanation. The shilling ceased to exist as a form of currency.
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  #12  
Old 05-21-2000, 12:04 AM
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Did anyone else, upon a first reading, think this thread was titled "Please explain British money to a yak..."?
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  #13  
Old 05-21-2000, 05:12 AM
casdave casdave is offline
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When were pound notes red?

A far as I remember they have always been green.

Maybe you are thinking too literally. "Reddies" should be "readies" as in ready money, cash not cheques.

The old 10/- (10shilling) was a a slightly reddish brown.

I used to love the old money .Those coins were far more substantial.
In the days when men were men you could see them limping after running for the bus due to the change bashing round in their manly but unfortunately deep pockets, heh!
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  #14  
Old 05-21-2000, 06:47 AM
notquitekarpov notquitekarpov is online now
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Slang-wise there was also the "tanner" which I think was sixpence. Slightly off message but related there is also slang used for multiples of pounds - restricted to horse racing circles mostly - involving monkeys (£50 ?), ponies (£20 I think) et al. Does anybody know the full list - and is it the same in the USA or do you guys have your own code?
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  #15  
Old 05-21-2000, 08:19 AM
London_Calling London_Calling is offline
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Top of my head.....

A Fiver = £5
A Tenner = £10
A Score = £20
A Pony = £25
A Bullseye = £50
A One-er = £100
A Monkey = £500
A Grand = £1,000
An Archer = varies, not settled yet but usually £2,000
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  #16  
Old 05-21-2000, 08:30 AM
Gilligan Gilligan is offline
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Some U.S. examples I can think of off the top of my head:

A fin - $5
A sawbuck - $10
A C-note - $100

Thanks for "tenner"; this now makes clear a line from Jethro Tull's Thick as a Brick: "...he coughed up a tenner on a premium bond win..." I never knew what the heck he was talking about.
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  #17  
Old 05-21-2000, 01:30 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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Also in the U.S. there's "a grand" for $1000. "Fin", "sawbuck", "C-note", and "grand" are all rather old-fashioned and cutesy tough. I can imagine hearing "grand", although I wouldn't use it, but I can't imagine hearing someone today using the others.
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  #18  
Old 05-21-2000, 03:37 PM
samclem samclem is offline
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In the US, a $20 is a double sawbuck. But, as WW said, I can't imagine the average person using most of the terms. Once in a while, I'll hear a "high roller" using 'C-note'.

Considering the fact that we still have a candy bar called 100 Grand it certainly still gets used.
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  #19  
Old 05-21-2000, 08:50 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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From my experience with British books, the British "quid" is about equivalent in usage to the American "buck", i.e., "can you lend me a couple quid?" as opposed to "can you lend me a couple bucks?". Just my two, um, small units of currency.
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  #20  
Old 05-22-2000, 04:09 AM
TheMadHun TheMadHun is offline
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Quote:
Pounds can be refered to as Quid or Reddies (pound notes used to be colored red but now are replaced by coins).
Except in Scotland where we still have our old green-coloured pound notes
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  #21  
Old 05-22-2000, 12:26 PM
jayron 32 jayron 32 is offline
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U.S. money slang I've heard in common parlance

$.25 -- Two bits (from when Dollar coins were based on the Spanish Reals, and were often cut into 8 pieces or "bits" to make smaller change)

$1.00 -- Buck (Buck is also colloquial slang for the number (not denomination) "hundred". Where I grew up, we'd say "rolling a buck" for driving 100 miles/hour)

$5.00 -- Fin, finster, fiver

$10.00 -- Sawbuck (goes back to old ten dollar notes which had the roman numeral X printed on them... resembled a sawhorse (sawbuck))

$20.00 -- Double Sawbuck

$100.00 -- C-note, Hundy, Benjamin

$1000.00 -- Grand, G
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  #22  
Old 05-22-2000, 12:29 PM
RussellM RussellM is offline
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We probably shouldn't remind them that Scottish notes can be printed by The Bank of Scotland, The Royal Bank of Scotland and the Clydesdale bank - and that all of them look different.

Russell
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  #23  
Old 05-22-2000, 05:04 PM
ruadh ruadh is offline
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... and don't forget the Northern Ireland notes either!
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  #24  
Old 05-22-2000, 06:29 PM
Crusoe Crusoe is offline
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...of course, here we go with Gibraltar coinage...
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  #25  
Old 05-22-2000, 06:56 PM
London_Calling London_Calling is offline
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They also use 'pounds' in Egypt - different kind.

My linguistic abilities - not being what they should be - cannot confirm that 500 pounds in Cairo is known to the locals as 'a camal'
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  #26  
Old 05-22-2000, 10:16 PM
samclem samclem is offline
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Jayron 32 said
Quote:
$.25 -- Two bits (from when Dollar coins were based on the Spanish Reals, and were often cut into 8 pieces or "bits" to make smaller change)
Not to hijack this thread, but I have been considering writing a thread as to how I believe this to be an UL.

As a professional coin dealer for over 30 years, specializing in World Coins, these cut-up pieces of 8 Real coins just don't show up! Yet people pass along the story that they were cut into fractional bits. BS I say!
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  #27  
Old 05-23-2000, 06:59 AM
Moonshine Moonshine is offline
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In trading we call a billion of anything a "yard" after the imperial measure of distance (not the place you put your pool).
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  #28  
Old 07-30-2002, 08:08 PM
tracer tracer is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by samclem
Considering the fact that we still have a candy bar called 100 Grand it certainly still gets used.
Just for the record, Nestle's "100 Grand" bar used to be called the "$100,000 Bar".

No, really!
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  #29  
Old 07-30-2002, 09:37 PM
tracer tracer is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by samclem
Considering the fact that we still have a candy bar called 100 Grand it certainly still gets used.
Just for the record, Nestle's "100 Grand" bar used to be called the "$100,000 Bar".

No, really!
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  #30  
Old 07-30-2002, 10:50 PM
Kalashnikov Kalashnikov is offline
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also if you were to buy a "dime bag"`of certain illicit substances, you'd be buying $10 worth
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  #31  
Old 07-30-2002, 11:15 PM
Bernard Marx Bernard Marx is offline
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Quote:
originally posted by Kipper

2/6 means two shillings and six pence and is refered to as half a bob or a half crown. A crown was a five shilling piece or one bob.
Actually a bob was the same as a shilling. See http://65.107.211.206/economics/currency.html
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  #32  
Old 07-31-2002, 12:17 AM
Cap'n Crude Cap'n Crude is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by samclem
Jayron 32 said

Not to hijack this thread, but I have been considering writing a thread as to how I believe this to be an UL.

As a professional coin dealer for over 30 years, specializing in World Coins, these cut-up pieces of 8 Real coins just don't show up! Yet people pass along the story that they were cut into fractional bits. BS I say!
As far as I know, the American term "two bits" has nothing to do with cutting up coins -- you're thinking of "pieces of eight." The story I heard was that during the period when the phrase came into use, two bits (the thing that goes in a horse's mouth that is attached to the reins) cost 25 cents.
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  #33  
Old 07-31-2002, 09:20 AM
Futile Gesture Futile Gesture is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by London_Calling
Top of my head.....

A Fiver = £5
A Tenner = £10
A Score = £20
A Pony = £25
A Bullseye = £50
A One-er = £100
A Monkey = £500
A Grand = £1,000
An Archer = varies, not settled yet but usually £2,000
It should be emphasised that you don't need to know most of these terms unless you are intend opening up a market stall in east London and doing business with dodgy cockney geezers.

Using them anywhere else is likely to get you called "a plonka" and accused of watching too much TV.
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  #34  
Old 07-31-2002, 09:36 AM
owlstretchingtime owlstretchingtime is offline
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On similar lines to the above:

A Jacks (alive) =£5

A cockle (and hen) =£10

A McGarret = £50 (from Hawaii five-0)

A Carpet = £300 (no idea why)

A Ton = £100

A Burlington (Bertie) £30

hope this helps me old china.

Also a groat was 4d
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  #35  
Old 07-31-2002, 12:02 PM
yabob yabob is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by samclem
Jayron 32 said

Not to hijack this thread, but I have been considering writing a thread as to how I believe this to be an UL.

As a professional coin dealer for over 30 years, specializing in World Coins, these cut-up pieces of 8 Real coins just don't show up! Yet people pass along the story that they were cut into fractional bits. BS I say!
The slightly different variant I've heard is that when the Spanish dollar and US dollar circulated at equal value, actual one Real coins (not cut up 8 Real dollar pieces) were known as "bits", leading to a quarter = 2 bits. Perhaps you could comment on the veracity of that notion. It also begs the question of why the Real would have been called a "bit".
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  #36  
Old 07-31-2002, 12:52 PM
Rayne Man Rayne Man is offline
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Pounds are also the currency in Cyprus but they are divided into 100 cents and not pence. Currently the Cyprus pound is worth about 10% more than the UK pound. On the question of what " four and six " means this helped to trap a German spy in WW2. He had landed by parachute in England and walked to a railway station to buy a ticket. The clerk told him it was something like " three and six " and he gave the clerk three pounds and six shillings instead of three shillings and six pence. The clerk became suspicious , called the police and the spy was arrested.
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  #37  
Old 07-31-2002, 01:05 PM
Pábitel Pábitel is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Cap'n Crude

As far as I know, the American term "two bits" has nothing to do with cutting up coins -- you're thinking of "pieces of eight." The story I heard was that during the period when the phrase came into use, two bits (the thing that goes in a horse's mouth that is attached to the reins) cost 25 cents.
Um, no.

This slang comes from the southwest of USA. There was a Spanish coin that was called a bit that was equal to 1/8th of a Spanish dollar. The term bit took on the colloquial meaning of 1/8th of something. 1/8th of a dollar is 12.5 cents. Therefore a quarter, or any other combination of coins equaling 25 cents, was referred to as two bits. There was at one point even a slang term for the dime that referred to it as a "short bit".

I used to have a really good link for this one but can't find it right now. Here is another that says pretty much the same thing amongst a great deal of dancing about.

http://www.randomhouse.com/wotd/inde...?date=19971006
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  #38  
Old 07-31-2002, 04:57 PM
HPL HPL is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by C K Dexter Haven
London_c says: << You don't really need to know about all the old terminology >>

Not unless you happen to be reading a book, or watching a movie or tv show, from before 1970, say.
I've heard a lot of terms from watching the various "Blackadder"
series, all of which take place before 1918.
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