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  #1  
Old 04-21-2004, 03:44 PM
JohnBckWLD JohnBckWLD is offline
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The Generation X Cicadas Are Coming! The Generation X Cicadas Are Coming!

Cicadas. Or as we say in my neck of the woods, "chick-ayduh bugs.

It's been 17 years since the last seasonal brood of cicada bugs emerged from their long subterranian slumber and paid a visit to the East Coast of the USA.

This generation of cicadas in named Brood X.
(I find myself wondering if the 1987 swarm was called The Baby Boomer Brood & whether the 2021 brood will be called Brood Y).

According to National Geograhic Online, Brood X is a couple of degrees / days / inches away from paying us a visit.

If you live east of the Mississippi, you can look forward to:
  • A very noisy May.
    (I kinda like the sound - especially in the morning. It kinda says love is in the air.)
  • The tops of tress being ravaged.
    (Think of all the $ you'll save on that arborist you were gonna hire to trim back all the new growth).
  • Getting pelted in the face if you ride a bicycle or motorcycle.
    (Even if your from the 'Fuck Helmet Laws' crowd - I strongly suggest you go out and get one with a face shield).
  • Outdoor cats having a ball.
    (After cicadas finish mating, they like to lay half dead on your back patio. Cats like nothing better than toying and sparring with them).
  • Dogs flipping out.
    (Chowhounds; like my 2 dogs, sometimes try to eat them. Imagine their shock when their assumed lifeless treats begin protesting by buzzing around in their mouths).
  • Little boys tormenting the little girls in the neighborhood.
    (There's nothing like the shrieks of little girls on a warm spring weekend as the boys next door pick cicadas off the ground and hold them in your daughters faces. It kinda says, Summer's almost here)

If you're too young to recall the last swarm - or if you've moved to the east coast after the Spring of 1987 - You're in for either a rare treat - or a big nuisance - depending on your perspective.
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  #2  
Old 04-21-2004, 04:00 PM
Hal Briston Hal Briston is offline
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You forgot one other thing to look forward to -- readily available snacks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by nationalgeographic.com
According to [biologist and cicada expert Gene] Kritsky, the best time to eat a cicada is just after they break open their youthful skin. "When you eat them when they're soft and mushy, when they come out of their skin, they taste like cold, canned asparagus," he said.
Where's the ::gonna fricking hurl:: icon when you need it?
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Old 04-21-2004, 04:14 PM
Olentzero Olentzero is offline
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Dude, I'ma totally stir-fry those puppies up. Catch 'em just out of the ground, freeze 'em so they drift off painlessly, and eat 'em. Oh yas.

I thought the X in Brood X was a group designator, not a generation number, though.
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Old 04-21-2004, 04:17 PM
Olentzero Olentzero is offline
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Looking at the FAQ JohnBck linked to, however, I see I am wrong about the X.

I'm still gonna eat 'em, though.
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  #5  
Old 04-21-2004, 06:52 PM
jackelope jackelope is offline
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I remember a brood that popped up in the summer of '92, when I lived outside of Athens, GA. Those suckers were LOUD. I'd be on the porch drinking beer with my roommate (I did that a lot that summer), and one of them would start up and we'd literally have to shout to be heard over him.
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Old 04-21-2004, 07:03 PM
herownself herownself is offline
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I lived in Baltimore the last time those nasty things 'visited'. Freaked me out. I am just not a big nasty bug kind of a gal, especially in Baltimore where they are really more like 'yet another but these are special' kind of nasty brown flying/crawling/possibly get in your hair kind of bug. I've got the heebie-jeebies just thinking about it.
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  #7  
Old 04-21-2004, 07:07 PM
Lsura Lsura is offline
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I remember a brood in Nashville in the summer of 1998, but I didn't have the cats them.

I'm quite sure that the kitties will LOVE watching these through the screen door (I'm not letting the clawless wonders outside, even onto a second floor balcony.) Jake in particular will barely be able to hold himself back from the door.

Me? Well....my windows will stay open at night, unless they get too loud. I really don't want to turn on the AC this early in the year though - I finally got a bill with no heat for a month, and I'd like to get a second one that low before we get deep into AC season.
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  #8  
Old 04-21-2004, 10:14 PM
moi moi is offline
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I'd love to hear more about these damn things, since all anyone at work has been able to tell me is that they're going to be everywhere and hella noisy.
Especially from you, herownself, as I'm now living in your old haunt, Charm City.

going off to read the posted links...
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  #9  
Old 04-22-2004, 01:37 AM
Blackeyes Blackeyes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBckWLD
(After cicadas finish mating, they like to lay half dead on your back patio.
WOW!!!
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  #10  
Old 04-22-2004, 01:50 AM
Tentacle Monster Tentacle Monster is offline
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Olentzero: Um... what do cicadas taste of?
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  #11  
Old 04-22-2004, 07:51 AM
Lady Ice Lady Ice is offline
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I remember the last time. They were so thick on the sidewalks in the downtown area, the shop owners would have to sweep them into the gutters so that you could walk without the constant crunch, crunch, crunch.

What made it really bad was that it was also incredibly hot at the same time. Imagine the smell of decomposing cicadas in the gutters. It wasn't pleasant.
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Old 04-22-2004, 09:12 AM
Cinnamon Girl Cinnamon Girl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tentacle Monster
Olentzero: Um... what do cicadas taste of?
From the FAQ at the link above:

Periodical cicadas are best eaten when they are still white (teneral), and they taste like cold canned asparagus.
I, for one, am horrified by the coming infestation. But, in the great words of FDR "There's nothing to fear, but fear itself." So, I've decided (at least for now) that I'm am going to conquer my fear by eating some of those damn buggers. Besides, I like asparagus...even from a can.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackeyes
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBckWLD
(After cicadas finish mating, they like to lay half dead on your back patio.
WOW!!!
Now that is a great lay!
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  #13  
Old 04-22-2004, 12:35 PM
fighting ignorant fighting ignorant is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinnamon Girl
From the FAQ at the link above:
But, in the great words of FDR "There's nothing to fear, but fear itself."
Interestingly, that's only a partial quotation. The full quotation actually reads
Quote:
"We have nothing to fear but fear itself, and a giant swarm of insects blacking out the sky and buzzing around in your face.
Amazing that most people to this day still have never heard the full context.
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  #14  
Old 04-22-2004, 12:40 PM
Olentzero Olentzero is offline
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Tentacle Monster, I'll give you my informed opinion once I've actually caught and eaten a couple of the dudes. Although I'm racking my brain trying to think where in the heck I might be able to find some. I'll have to see what kind of trees they like and roam the parks around here at night looking for 'em.
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  #15  
Old 04-22-2004, 01:07 PM
Olentzero Olentzero is offline
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A Further Correction.

The X is not, in fact, a generational marker - it is a brood designator. Brood X has always been Brood X:
Quote:
Groups of cicadas that share the same emergence years are called broods. Charles Marlatt, a bureaucrat working for the Department of Agriculture, designated all the cicadas that emerged in 1893 and at 17-year intervals thereafter as Brood I. The cicadas that emerged in 1894 were called Brood II, and so on. The cicadas that will appear in 2004 belong to Brood X, which is the largest of the 17-year broods.
From JohnBckWLD's first link in the OP. Brood X was the brood that appeared in 1902. So, in 2005, Brood XI will make its appearance, and so on until Brood I starts the cycle again in 2012.

So now I'm all interested in the thirteen-year cicadas as well. Sheesh.
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  #16  
Old 04-22-2004, 01:47 PM
Olentzero Olentzero is offline
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More cicada stuffs!

An interesting BBC article, which notes that there were originally 30 broods of periodical cicadas, but that some of the broods have apparently become extinct.

Another nifty cicada FAQ, which has maps of where the still extant broods emerge.

And, for our grandchildren, should all go well, the year 2089 ought to be real interesting. That year, Brood X (the biggest brood of the 17-year cicadas) and Brood XIX (the biggest brood of the 13-year cicadas) will both emerge. Basically, the whole Southeast US will be Cicadaville. And again in 2310.

OK, I'm done. I'll be good now.
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  #17  
Old 04-22-2004, 01:48 PM
Bruce_Daddy Bruce_Daddy is offline
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17 years? I hear those things every summer. Does math in head No, I don't remember anything special about the summer when I was 11.

17 years?

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  #18  
Old 04-22-2004, 02:00 PM
Olentzero Olentzero is offline
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Well, you're hearing other broods of the 17-year species every year, as well as the annual species. So it's no surprise you're hearing cicadas every year.

Where were you living when you were 11?
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  #19  
Old 04-22-2004, 02:09 PM
Skywatcher Skywatcher is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olentzero
Dude, I'ma totally stir-fry those puppies up. Catch 'em just out of the ground, freeze 'em so they drift off painlessly, and eat 'em. Oh yas.
Ingredients: Cicadas, anises, salt, rice wine, mashed garlic, celery, and turnip greens.

Recipe:

1. Boil the cicadas and anises in salted rice wine for five minutes, then remove the cicadas.

2. Saute the mashed garlic, adding water and rice wine to make a paste.

3. Deep-fry the cicadas, then skewer them with bamboo picks. Arrange them on a plate with the turnip greens, celery, and garlic paste to look like the cicadas are climbing out of a mud pie onto green foliage. Bon appetit!

(Courtesy of West Virginia University Alumni Magazine)

BTW: there is at least one restaurant around here, don't remember which, that has added fried cidadas to its appetizer menu.
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Old 04-22-2004, 02:36 PM
Maus Magill Maus Magill is offline
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Thanks for the links, Olentzero. Now I know I'm not going nuts when I remember the hoard of cicadas in 1998.

My friend and I would sit on my back deck drinking beer and watching the cat catch cicadas. I don't think she liked the way they tasted though. Unlike everything else she would catch she wouldn't eat the darned things; she would just sit there with one in her mouth, not wanting to let go, but not wanting to eat it either.
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  #21  
Old 04-22-2004, 07:20 PM
herownself herownself is offline
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Well, Moi, you know those big nasty water bugs that live on the sidewalks in the summer? The ones that sort of scatter in front of you as you walk down the street? These are like that, only bigger, they don't scatter, they're on the trees and the bushes and the grass, and they don't scatter. Also they fly. If your head is in the way of the mate they hear singing behind you, they'll fly right at you.

And they fuck. They make all kinds of noise so that they can fuck. So soon, you don't see one bug, you see groups of two copulating bugs. {I am becoming ill as I write this. Me no likey big nasty copulating noisy bugs}

And then they die. So then there are crunchy dead bug corpses all over the place. Meantime, still more are hatching, making mating calls, flying at your hair, copulating, and dying.

When you go outside at the height of the 'season', the noise they make kind of crawls over your skin and inside your head. At least, that was how I felt. My dad had a horror of roaches, he passed it down to me, and then when I was living away from home for the first time I found myself in the mutant roach bordello. It was their world, I just lived in it.
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  #22  
Old 04-22-2004, 07:56 PM
Cinnamon Girl Cinnamon Girl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olentzero
Tentacle Monster, I'll give you my informed opinion once I've actually caught and eaten a couple of the dudes. Although I'm racking my brain trying to think where in the heck I might be able to find some. I'll have to see what kind of trees they like and roam the parks around here at night looking for 'em.
Don't eat 'em once their wings have dried and they're flying around though. My understanding is to really enjoy your feast you need to get the young'uns that have just crawled up the tree and grab 'em once they've emerged from the exoskeleton (scroll down for a particularly lovely shot of emergence) and crawled out. They're probably still all plump and juicy at that stage.

Where to find them? Once they start coming out, you'll be able to tell where the heavily infested areas are. Go there and find the oldest trees where you'll probably see lots of abandoned shells. Then you want to hang out a bit and wait for the cicadas to emerge. Bring a jar, fill it up with as many as you can and rush home with your catch.

May I recommend Cicada Shanghai with a lovely white wine?
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  #23  
Old 04-22-2004, 08:49 PM
jackelope jackelope is offline
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By the way, I keep seeing this thread title and getting a mental image of a bunch of "Generation X cicadas" sitting around in coffee shops wearing vintage flannel, reading Douglas Coupland, and showing off their Lollapalooza mosh-pit scars.

Is that just me?
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  #24  
Old 04-22-2004, 11:04 PM
Lissa Lissa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBckWLD
Cicadas. Or as we say in my neck of the woods, "chick-ayduh bugs.
Around here, that word is pronounced "chick-uh-dees", but they're more commonly referred to as "locusts."

I don't know why in the world it got that pronunciation, but I remember as a child seeing that word spelled out in books and having no idea to what it referred, because I had only ever heard the bugs called "chick-uh-dees."

Around here, they're looked forward to eagerly by the older folks. They always discuss the last "Big Locust" at exhaustive length, and gleefully predict that the "signs" point to a swarm on par with a Biblical plauge. Just what these "signs" are, I cannot say. (I imagine it's something along the lines of "signs" like predicting the severity of the coming winter by the size of the black stripe on "wooly worms.")
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  #25  
Old 04-23-2004, 05:20 AM
CreaseMunky CreaseMunky is offline
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I despise large, ugly bugs. I have ever since I was a kid. Even tho I am in my late 30s, I still scream like a little girl with a skinned knee whenever I see one of those big ass roaches... especially in my house (FTR, I live in Texas. "Big ass" means "BIG F'IN ASS").

Told you that story to tell you this one:

When I was a kid, every summer I went to visit my cousins in middle-of-nowhere Maryland. Rural, lots of wide open spaces with lots of trees. Big difference from NYC, where I lived at the time. I always looked forward to these vacations every summer because I liked my aunt and I liked my cousins.

One year I was 9, maybe 10, and made my pilgrimmage. The youngest of my cousins (S.) had made a collection of cicada shells. He put them in a coffee jar and just, well, had them sitting on his dresser in his room. Yes, I was fully aware of the fact that they were just shells and not all that different from a shedded snake skin, but they were large, they were ugly, and they came from a bug. They pretty much induced terror in me.

I made the very big mistake of telling S. this. He and his older brother H. then made it their mission in life to chase me around the house with the shells, chase me around the yard with the shells, surreptitiously put the shells on my shoulder... pretty much doing anything they could to torment me mercilessly with the shells. Left them on my pillow... I mean anything.

One day, H. came to me and said, "OK. We know you hate the shells, so we won't bother you with them anymore. Instead, we'll use what came out of the shells!" and waved an alive and kicking cicada in front of my face that he was holding by the wings. I have already made a mention of my aversion to large, ugly bugs, right? Yeah, the reaction was about what you'd expect. Screaming, running, locking myself in my room, etc.

Everybody has phobias. I'm OK with heights, the dark, spiders (yes, even big ones... spiders aren't bugs in my book), public speaking, tight spaces, and snakes. Let me see a big ugly bug and I turn into a basket case.

I told you that story to tell you this one:

Next month, I will be going home to LI for a week to attend a wedding. Next month. In the middle of swarm time. Mom has quite a few trees around her house. Quite a few big trees. Which will probably be the playground of a lot of big, ugly cicadas.

Ugh.
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  #26  
Old 04-23-2004, 08:00 AM
Olentzero Olentzero is offline
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Nah, CreaseMunky, you should be fine. Check the Brood X map out and you'll see LI doesn't even have a poorly established record for this brood. It's Brood XIV you want to watch out for, and they won't be around until 2008. You still have a couple years to enjoy that feeling of impending cicada doom.

Lissa, where I come from a chickadee is a little black, white, and brown birdie.
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  #27  
Old 04-23-2004, 08:17 AM
TroubleAgain TroubleAgain is offline
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Well, looks like brood X doesn't live here...but that's fine with me. We have cidadas every summer...love to hear 'em, it means summer to me!
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  #28  
Old 04-23-2004, 09:14 AM
Cub Mistress Cub Mistress is offline
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My area is scheduled for an invasion from Brood X. I'm not looking forward to it at all. I tend to stay inside, having a morbid dread of bugs getting entangled in my hair.

Around here the name is pronounced "Suh-Kay- duhs." I had a 1998 T-shirt that said "See ya later, cicada" that I thought was pretty cute.
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Old 04-23-2004, 10:23 AM
Skywatcher Skywatcher is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinnamon Girl
May I recommend Cicada Shanghai with a lovely white wine?
Seems I've seen that recipe before...
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  #30  
Old 04-29-2004, 12:52 AM
Lissa Lissa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olentzero
Lissa, where I come from a chickadee is a little black, white, and brown birdie.
*shrug*

Our local nomenclature has rarely had much to do with logic. All sodas are called "Coke", "dinner" is the noontime meal, and the hills are referred to as "mountains."
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  #31  
Old 04-29-2004, 07:16 AM
Bruce_Daddy Bruce_Daddy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olentzero
Well, you're hearing other broods of the 17-year species every year, as well as the annual species. So it's no surprise you're hearing cicadas every year.

Where were you living when you were 11?
Upstate SC.

No, it didn't take me a week to remember.
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  #32  
Old 04-29-2004, 07:58 AM
Jane D'oh! Jane D'oh! is offline
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I am not looking forward to this. I was living in Cleveland a few years back when we had a major hatching. I have two gross memories from that summer.

One was going to see Elton John at an outdoor venue. The cicada were so thick in the air, I did not want to get out of the car. They were everywhere. I think we stayed at the concert for about 30 ir 40 minutes. I just couldn't do it. Driving out, I drove over a bunch of them. The sound of them under the car. Yuck, yuck yuck.

I used to leave my patio door open so the dog could go in and out as he pleased. We were on the third floor, it was a small patio, but the dog loved to lay out there. I came home one night and there was a cicada at the screen door. I closed the screen on the cicada and cut it in half. It's dead, I thought, and I went to bed. When I got up in the morning, the head and upper body of the cicada was in the middle of the living room floor. Apparently, it was not as dead as I thought.

It is not fair that I live through the 17 year cycles every 8 - 10 years. My next move will be strictly determined by the non-presence of cicada. Alaska, maybe?
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  #33  
Old 04-29-2004, 11:37 AM
Angua Angua is offline
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OK, guys, I have to ask - just how far north do these things go? I ask as I'm going to be in Toronto, and Albany NY, this May. Just reading about the buggers is freaking me out...
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  #34  
Old 04-29-2004, 11:45 AM
Olentzero Olentzero is offline
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You're safe, Angua - the brood will barely reach New York City, if they even succeed in getting that far north.

On other subjects, how's your brother recovering? Any progress on his court case?
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Old 04-29-2004, 11:49 AM
Angua Angua is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olentzero
You're safe, Angua - the brood will barely reach New York City, if they even succeed in getting that far north.
Phew *breathes a huge sigh of relief*

Quote:
On other subjects, how's your brother recovering? Any progress on his court case?
He's a lot better now. Thanks for asking. He's back at school, and due to sit his exams soon, and the kid responsible was given a non-custodial sentence of community service, ordered to pay some compensation (can't remember how much), and ordered to attend anger management classes.
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  #36  
Old 04-29-2004, 11:57 AM
Green Cymbeline Green Cymbeline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Olsen
Ingredients: Cicadas, anises, salt, rice wine, mashed garlic, celery, and turnip greens.

Recipe:

1. Boil the cicadas and anises in salted rice wine for five minutes, then remove the cicadas.

2. Saute the mashed garlic, adding water and rice wine to make a paste.

3. Deep-fry the cicadas, then skewer them with bamboo picks. Arrange them on a plate with the turnip greens, celery, and garlic paste to look like the cicadas are climbing out of a mud pie onto green foliage. Bon appetit!

(Courtesy of West Virginia University Alumni Magazine)

BTW: there is at least one restaurant around here, don't remember which, that has added fried cidadas to its appetizer menu.
Slightly off topic: Jeff, did you go to WVU? I did, graduated in 1998
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  #37  
Old 04-29-2004, 04:07 PM
PunditLisa PunditLisa is offline
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How the hell do they know 17 years is up? They must have zero metabolism? What in the world do they live on for that long? Why do I have to live in an area where Gen X Cicadas flourish? Why did Oltenzero put a when he reported that some of these broods have become extinct?
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  #38  
Old 04-30-2004, 08:30 AM
Olentzero Olentzero is offline
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Because it makes me sad. Duh.

I like cicadas, all they do for 17 years is eat, then they come out for four weeks and f*ck like dogs in the street, then they die. Translated into human terms, that would be roughly 68 years of non-stop feeding followed by four months of non-stop orgy, followed by a quick yet rather peaceful death. (Barring any giant kittens that would bat us around as we lay on the back porch awaiting the end.) I could live with that.
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  #39  
Old 04-30-2004, 08:48 AM
Hal Briston Hal Briston is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olentzero
Translated into human terms, that would be roughly 68 years of non-stop feeding followed by four months of non-stop orgy...
AKA, The Ron Jeremy Story.
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  #40  
Old 04-30-2004, 09:15 AM
jellytoes jellytoes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olentzero
Nah, CreaseMunky, you should be fine. Check the Brood X map out and you'll see LI doesn't even have a poorly established record for this brood. It's Brood XIV you want to watch out for, and they won't be around until 2008. You still have a couple years to enjoy that feeling of impending cicada doom.

Lissa, where I come from a chickadee is a little black, white, and brown birdie.

Crap on a stick. I live smack in the middle of a RED zone on the map. Then again, if the bugs aren't poisonsous, I think I'll be fine. I'm originally a westerner y'know. We're tough.

::trying to look burly::
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  #41  
Old 04-30-2004, 09:28 AM
booklover booklover is offline
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FWIW, I ate one of the Brood X cicadas the last time they were around and it didn't taste like much of anything to me---it was just a bit scratchy/tickly going down. Despite the fact that I've been a vegetarian for the last 13 years I'm tempted to try them again this time and see if they really do taste like asparagus.

I'm psyched about them coming---I think I've seen a few of their holes recently, so I should have plenty in my neighborhood.
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  #42  
Old 04-30-2004, 10:34 AM
JohnBckWLD JohnBckWLD is offline
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May 2004 Survival Kit

Natural Enemy: The Cicanda Killer Wasp
Not to be confused with the James Montgomery Exterminator Company; who pull up to your house in a Rolls Royce wearing pastel colored sweaters draped over their shoulders, dockers slacks and boat shoes.

Jacques Tiziou's Pan Fried Cicada Recipe: On Real Player. From NBC 5i's Food Section
The link won't work with a pop-up blocker - I personally would have preferred a vomit blocker. I'm still waiting for the first politician to propose the cicada surplus as an inexpensive way to feed Baltimore's homeless population.

Home Gardeners Breathe a Sigh of Relief: Brood X Cicadas Will Cause Limited Damage To Trees, Yard Plants Across Eastern US
Solution: Netting -- with holes no greater than one-half inch across -- securely over the top of vulnerable plants. With 1/2" netting, dolphins are safe - but if ducks get get tied up in 6-pack rings - I don't know if cicada nets are safe for sparrows or hummingbirds.

Geographical Reach: According to the New York Times: "Not even Central Park is immune: Brood X was reported there in 1885"
If we see a repeat in 04, I guess the wooded area southwest of the sailing pond will become a 'cruise-free zone' this spring. That's good news for the Parks Dept - picking up spent condoms with those 'litter spike sticks' has got to be a real bitch.
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  #43  
Old 04-30-2004, 11:38 AM
lieu lieu is offline
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Anyone else picturing Olentzero on a motorcycle speeding through a swarm of locusts with mouth wide open like a basking shark through plankton?

I am so looking forward to a follow-up report.
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  #44  
Old 04-30-2004, 11:57 AM
Jinx Jinx is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBckWLD
...they like to lay half dead on your back patio...
Hmm, where do they lay half-live?

Quote:
If you're too young to recall the last swarm - or if you've moved to the east coast after the Spring of 1987 - You're in for either a rare treat - or a big nuisance - depending on your perspective.
Some say I've been blessed. I lived on the East Coast (Mid-Atlantic) all my life. I was in the heart of Philly in 1987, never saw a bug even walking around a lush, tree-lined campus in University City. Prior to that, I was just 3 years old in 1970 with no bad memories of these bugs at all. Now, my employment involves pounding the pavement in DC (away from the Mall area). I wonder if I'll see much. Back home in the 'burbs, my development was built right on the '87-88 border. Some say we won't see much there, either...being a new development & surrounded by farmland with minimal nearby forests. Hmm...

My older sisters, however, have been scarred (and scared) for life! Now, if only something important like Halley's comet or a total solar eclipse over this area came as often! But oh no! Instead,we get these pellets of flying protoplasm!
- Jinx
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  #45  
Old 04-30-2004, 01:05 PM
Olentzero Olentzero is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lieu
Anyone else picturing Olentzero on a motorcycle speeding through a swarm of locusts with mouth wide open like a basking shark through plankton?
You don't eat 'em as fully formed adults, you eat 'em (after a small amount of preparation) after they've just emerged from the ground and before their exoskeletons have hardened. Makes me wonder when booklover got at one.
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  #46  
Old 04-30-2004, 08:34 PM
Crescent Crescent is offline
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I remember the 1970 horde, we had just moved to a farm in southern York County, PA from a very suburban area near Philly. Ugh... they were awful, noisy and everywhere.
I looked on that map and we're right in the thick of it for this brood. Gee... something to look forward to.
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  #47  
Old 04-30-2004, 09:52 PM
RTFirefly RTFirefly is offline
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I was a kid in northern VA in 1962 when Brood II was around. They were everywhere.

I was a teenager in northern VA in 1970 when Brood X should have been there. Nothing.

I was living in northern VA in 1979, just a few miles from where I grew up, when Brood II should have reappeared. Nothing.

Sure, these guys are supposed to show up, but I'm less than convinced of their supposed reliability.
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  #48  
Old 04-30-2004, 10:08 PM
Never to be Queen Never to be Queen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lissa
Around here, they're looked forward to eagerly by the older folks. They always discuss the last "Big Locust" at exhaustive length, and gleefully predict that the "signs" point to a swarm on par with a Biblical plauge. Just what these "signs" are, I cannot say. (I imagine it's something along the lines of "signs" like predicting the severity of the coming winter by the size of the black stripe on "wooly worms.")
Hurray for the Seventeen Year Locust! I came to visit my grandparents in Southwestern Virginia for the last big swarm; now I live here. It was in the newspaper last time of how the cicadas had a "W" on their wings for war. This time, they are supposed to have a "P" for peace. Those are pretty good signs, don't you think?

The last summer they came I enjoyed collecting the shells and filling large mason jars with them.


JohnBckWLD: About the big scary wasp: That wasp in the picture was picking up a cicada! It said farther down the page they can both bite and sting!
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  #49  
Old 05-01-2004, 09:07 AM
Hal Briston Hal Briston is offline
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A neat swarm pic is part of this story. Also, the AP says "don't let Fido have a flying snack!"
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  #50  
Old 05-01-2004, 04:36 PM
AskNott AskNott is offline
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I planted a tulip tree in my yard last week. This morning's Indianapolis Star had a big feature on cicadas. It said "delay planting trees until late June." Thanks a lot. It did say, though, that I could protect my tender young tree by wrapping it in cheesecloth. Cicadas, you see, split the bark of end shoots to lay eggs within. The shoot then dies. www.indystar.com

I once thought there must be thousands of cicadas in each tree to make that much racket. I have found, though, and nudged individuals. Each bug twirrs as loudly as an alarm clock. Yow. What I thought was a hundred was...maybe half a dozen.

I heard a bug guy on the radio replicate a cicada call. It's two notes. You whistle the higher one while vocalizing the lower one. I'll let you musicians work it out.
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