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Old 09-03-2004, 07:03 PM
odaran odaran is offline
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Scottish Terms of endearment

I am looking for Scottish terms of endearment that I can call my wife. I have already found hen and wifey but I want something that she will have to really search for if she wanted to know what it is. She does not speak Scotish and neither do I. So please don't give me something like you B and say it is my dear. I really thank you all in advance.
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Old 09-03-2004, 07:14 PM
bonzer bonzer is offline
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Dearie, bonny or my wee haggis?
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Old 09-03-2004, 07:19 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Amaid
Raonaid
Babag
Burracaid



Or, a better selection:

A ghrá = "love" (as in "hello love!")

A stór = "treasure"

Mo chroí = "my heart"

A chuisle ="pulse"

A chuisle mo chroí = "pulse of my heart"

Mo muirnín= "my darling"

A leanbh = "little one" or "baby"

A ghrá geal="beloved"
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Old 09-03-2004, 07:20 PM
odaran odaran is offline
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Thanks.

Let me clarify a little bit, my wife and I have been having some "issues" and I am looking to put the romance back into our marriage. We don't have pet names for each other and I wanted to start dropping them in emails that I send her but I don't want her to know right away what I am doing. Kind of like "what does _____ mean" and I reply "If you want to know you are going to have to find out for yourself".
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Old 09-03-2004, 07:21 PM
odaran odaran is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus
Amaid
Raonaid
Babag
Burracaid



Or, a better selection:

A ghrá = "love" (as in "hello love!")

A stór = "treasure"

Mo chroí = "my heart"

A chuisle ="pulse"

A chuisle mo chroí = "pulse of my heart"

Mo muirnín= "my darling"

A leanbh = "little one" or "baby"

A ghrá geal="beloved"
Ya that is what I was talking about and you beat me to the post when I went to clairify it .

Thanks alot
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Old 09-03-2004, 08:14 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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I'd save the first 4 for when you are having fun and she won't kill you for them. You see, they are "not quite" complimentary.

Raonaid, for example, means "ewe."
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Old 09-03-2004, 08:39 PM
CBCD CBCD is offline
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Ah yes - I know the song well - Scottish is a Lovin' Tongue.
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Old 09-04-2004, 07:19 AM
owlstretchingtime owlstretchingtime is offline
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Most Scottish men call their birds "doll".

It seems to go down well, especially if they remember to bring home a fish supper and bottle of Buckfast.
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Old 09-04-2004, 02:09 PM
ruadh ruadh is offline
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silenus's phrases are actually Irish, which is quite similar to Scottish Gaelic, but not quite the same. "Love" for example is actually gràdh and not grá in Scottish Gaelic. I'm not of a mind to look up the others. Anyway, I suppose it doesn't matter if she doesn't speak the language anyway, it's not like she'll know the difference.
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Old 09-04-2004, 02:36 PM
BrainGlutton BrainGlutton is offline
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Gaelic orthography (Irish or Scottish) has always puzzled me. How, for instance, does one pronounce "A chuisle" or "A leanbh"?

I read once that the Gaelic name for Dublin is "Baile Ath Cleath", but it's pronounced "blAH-kle-ah."
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Old 09-04-2004, 02:54 PM
ruadh ruadh is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrainGlutton
Gaelic orthography (Irish or Scottish) has always puzzled me. How, for instance, does one pronounce "A chuisle" or "A leanbh"?
"uh CHWISH-luh" (that "ch" sound should be of the German variety) and "uh LAN-uhv".

Gaelic orthography is difficult for someone who's not a native speaker, but it's actually far more regular than English orthography.


Quote:
I read once that the Gaelic name for Dublin is "Baile Ath Cleath", but it's pronounced "blAH-kle-ah."
More or less, yeah ("blah KLEE uh" is a bit closer). See my Location: for the correct spelling though
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Old 09-04-2004, 07:36 PM
BrainGlutton BrainGlutton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ruadh
Gaelic orthography is difficult for someone who's not a native speaker, but it's actually far more regular than English orthography.
Is there anyplace I can find a guide to it?
  #13  
Old 09-05-2004, 03:04 AM
ruadh ruadh is offline
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http://www.standingstones.com/gaelpron.html
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