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  #1  
Old 12-08-2004, 08:24 AM
Jadis Jadis is offline
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Why does exercising make me feel like crap?

You know, every time you see people talk about getting into an exercise routine, you invariably see them gush about how great and energized they feel. Am I the only person alive who feels like crap when they work out?

Seriously...exercising doesn't make me feel good. I mean, I know in my *head* that it's good for me, but physically, all it does is make me tired. I can feel proud of the fact that I made the effort, but other than that, there's really no reward. Instead of feeling energized and fit and blah blah blah....all I feel is worn out. And hungry.

Exercising doesn't charge me up for the day, it makes me want to stuff my face and then take a nap.

Am I alone here?
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  #2  
Old 12-08-2004, 08:39 AM
gobear gobear is offline
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Are you eating before you work out? A banana eaten right before you start will give you the energy you need to get through your workout.
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  #3  
Old 12-08-2004, 08:43 AM
Podkayne Podkayne is offline
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I've been feeling like crap after I exercised all week. I work out in the evenings, and I've just felt like a zombie afterwards. I complained about it to my husband, and said maybe I needed to tone down my workout. He asked me if I've beek staying hydrated.



Indeed, I keep forgetting my water bottle.

The other thing I've noticed is that if I work out with my heart rate at the low end of my aerobic zone, it basically sucks. If I get my heart rate up higher (right up at 80-90% of my max HR*) then I get some major endorphin action. So you might want to try to intensify your workout a bit and see if that gives you more energy. Seems counterintuitive, I know.

* I've done a full exercise test on a treadmill under the supervision of a licensed trainer, so I know my max heart rate and that it is safe for me to work in this range. This might not be safe for everyone. Talk to your doctor and/or a trainer to see what kind of workout will be safe and effective for you.
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  #4  
Old 12-08-2004, 08:48 AM
Jadis Jadis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gobear
Are you eating before you work out? A banana eaten right before you start will give you the energy you need to get through your workout.
It's not just around the time of my workout....I expect to be tired after I work out. It's all of the *other* time that I'm talking about. If I work out regularly, during all of the time in which I'm *not* working out, I want to sleep (and eat). I'm tired literally all of the time. I would come home from work and go directly to bed if I could.

Exercising simply does not make me feel better. Not one iota. Not before, after or during.
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  #5  
Old 12-08-2004, 08:50 AM
Jadis Jadis is offline
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Oh...and I forgot to mention. Bananas are of the debbil and should be banned from this earth. Where's the vomit smiley when you need one?
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  #6  
Old 12-08-2004, 09:18 AM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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I have a problem with long-term energy loss when I work out, too. It's a huge barrier for me. I actually ENJOY exercising (cycling, specifically) but I've come to avoid it because it siphons off my energy in the evening. I know it's not SPOZED to be like that, but over the years I've learned that what's SPOZED to be and what IS are not always the same thing. Especially where nutrition and exercise are concerned.
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  #7  
Old 12-08-2004, 09:34 AM
Jervoise Jervoise is offline
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An obvious question is: how much sleep are you getting?

Do you warm-up and cool-down diligently? IME, if I do a proper warm-up and cool-down, I feel full of endorphins after exercising. OTOH, if I rush in, hit some weights and rush out again, the post-exertion period makes me feel like I'm going to puke.
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  #8  
Old 12-08-2004, 09:42 AM
Jadis Jadis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jervoise
An obvious question is: how much sleep are you getting?

Do you warm-up and cool-down diligently? IME, if I do a proper warm-up and cool-down, I feel full of endorphins after exercising. OTOH, if I rush in, hit some weights and rush out again, the post-exertion period makes me feel like I'm going to puke.
I've always needed a lot of sleep...even when I'm not exercising, I need 8+ hours on work days. On weekends, when I can wake naturally, I sleep for 9.5-10 hours.

Getting enough sleep isn't the issue, unless I'm supposed to be sleeping 12 hours a day when I'm exercising.

My exercise right now is all swimming. I'm going 4x a week (MWF and one weekend day) and I swim approximately a half mile at a time, which takes me about 40 minutes. Warm up/cool down is done in the pool (warm up is a few slow laps, cool down is a few walking laps before I get out, then 5 minutes in the hot tub).

As I said, I'm not talking fatigue that's directly related to my workout. My workout itself is fine. It's the fact that I'm just generally worn out and hating life when I'm on a regular exercise regimen (regardless of what exercise I do...this swimming thing is new, the fatigue is not) I'm on. And yes, I've been to the doctor a number of times. I'm "healthy". Whatever.
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  #9  
Old 12-08-2004, 10:07 AM
Iris Iris is offline
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If you've been to the doctor and everything is fine, I would say your fatigue might be tied to your diet or you are exerting yourself too much, too soon, in the pool. I also swim 2-3x per week (early in the morning though) and I'm pretty worn out for most of the day, depending on how hard I push myself in the water. Maybe you should swim at a more comfortable pace and see if that makes you feel less fatigued afterwards.

I'd also recommend eating immediately after exercising. Even if you're not hungry, eat a granola bar or a yogurt or something you like that will replenish your energy. There are a lot of good nutrition books out there too that might be helpful. I've found the Sports Nutrition Guidebook by Nancy Clark to be really useful.

Then again, maybe swimming just doesn't give you an endorphin rush. It doesn't do it for me, I only feel that "high" after running.
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  #10  
Old 12-08-2004, 10:37 AM
Gangster Octopus Gangster Octopus is offline
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Don't be afraid to eat all your meals and be sure to include carbs...if you are working out, stay away from the Atkins nonsense
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  #11  
Old 12-08-2004, 11:05 AM
overlyverbose overlyverbose is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jadis
My exercise right now is all swimming. I'm going 4x a week (MWF and one weekend day) and I swim approximately a half mile at a time, which takes me about 40 minutes. Warm up/cool down is done in the pool (warm up is a few slow laps, cool down is a few walking laps before I get out, then 5 minutes in the hot tub).

As I said, I'm not talking fatigue that's directly related to my workout. My workout itself is fine. It's the fact that I'm just generally worn out and hating life when I'm on a regular exercise regimen (regardless of what exercise I do...this swimming thing is new, the fatigue is not) I'm on. And yes, I've been to the doctor a number of times. I'm "healthy". Whatever.
For some reason, swimming really tires me out. I trained for a triathalon earlier this year, and was fine biking and running, but when it came to swimming, I felt exhausted most of the time - during and after. I also got really cranky after. Anyway, have you exercised regularly in the past, or are you just starting out? Sometimes starting out exercising really sucks a big fat one. Or maybe swimming's not for you. Maybe you should try to find a form of exercise that doesn't really feel like exercise. Have you ever considered doing something like taking swing dancing classes, or salsa?
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  #12  
Old 12-08-2004, 11:06 AM
Giraffe Giraffe is offline
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I used to swim a few times a week, and I never felt particularly energized afterward. The day I swam I was usually tired and sluggish the rest of the day, although I felt fine on the days I hadn't swum. Now I mostly just play basketball, which gives me a lot of energy, especially after I've been playing regularly. It might have something to do with the heart rate intensity mentioned by Podkayne, I don't know.
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  #13  
Old 12-08-2004, 11:11 AM
jsgoddess jsgoddess is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jadis
As I said, I'm not talking fatigue that's directly related to my workout. My workout itself is fine. It's the fact that I'm just generally worn out and hating life when I'm on a regular exercise regimen (regardless of what exercise I do...this swimming thing is new, the fatigue is not) I'm on. And yes, I've been to the doctor a number of times. I'm "healthy". Whatever.
I feel your pain. Of course, I'm always always tired, but exercise makes it worse. The more exercise, the worse it gets. I've never had any sort of rush from exercising, and I'm "healthy" too.

Are you fatigued when you aren't exercising?
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  #14  
Old 12-08-2004, 12:29 PM
Jadis Jadis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsgoddess
Are you fatigued when you aren't exercising?
No, not really. As I said, I've always needed more regular sleep than anyone I know, but as long as I'm getting my regular sleep, I'm fine. When I'm on a workout plan, though, it's all I can do to drag myself out of bed in the morning, and laying on the sofa is all that's on my mind when I get home.

It's so frustrating. I wish I could be one of those people who gets a rush from exercising, but I just don't. I've done all manner of exercising (including real outdoor activities like hiking and mountain biking, not just boring gym stuff) and it's always the same. I know in my head that I need to do it, but it's an endless ordeal.
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  #15  
Old 12-08-2004, 06:25 PM
Eliahna Eliahna is online now
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I've been the same since childhood. Exercising puts me on a real downer, makes me feel tired, miserable and grumpy. In primary school our teachers used to make us run around the perimetre of the school once a week, and every single time my legs would break out in an itchy red rash. I've never been able to comprehend what people are talking about when they say that exercise gives them a high, because it's exactly the opposite for me. I'm not a model picture of good health, I've suffered fibromyalgia since I was 19 (9 years), but like I said, this pre-dates any of that and goes back as far as I can remember. My parents tell me that other people used to comment that I was the only two year old they ever met who didn't run everywhere.
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  #16  
Old 12-08-2004, 06:51 PM
sunstone sunstone is offline
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Jadis, maybe you want to consider the time of day that you are exercising. I know that for me, exercise in the afternoon is really hard. I never get into the groove, and am mostly tired afterwards, much like you.

However, if I exercise in the morning, it is endorphin time! And I feel energised for the rest of the day.

Also, for me, exercising in a gym is near torture to me. But listening to music does make it better. But I much prefer the outdoors.

I agree with other posters that swimming is not energising. So I hike in the hills surrounding the valley I live in....anywhere from 45 minutes to 3 hours, depending on the demands of the day. Weekends are for the longer hikes. I usually hike 2 days and take the 3rd day off, then repeat.

Best wishes for finding how to raise your energy!
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  #17  
Old 12-08-2004, 07:42 PM
Jadis Jadis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunstone
Jadis, maybe you want to consider the time of day that you are exercising. I know that for me, exercise in the afternoon is really hard. I never get into the groove, and am mostly tired afterwards, much like you.

However, if I exercise in the morning, it is endorphin time! And I feel energised for the rest of the day.
Seeing as how I need so much sleep in general, exercising in the morning has always been anathema to me. All of my previous gym efforts up until now always revolved around going *after* work. I was tired then, too.

This time around, I've been going to the gym at 6am. Believe me when I say it doesn't help to go in the morning. In a lot of ways, it's probably worse, because I don't want to get out of bed even on good, non-exercising days. Getting up at 6am is its own special little hell.
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  #18  
Old 12-08-2004, 09:11 PM
ultrafilter ultrafilter is offline
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How much are you eating? A combination of a very low calorie diet and any kind of exercise can wipe you out pretty well.
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  #19  
Old 12-08-2004, 10:55 PM
Walloon Walloon is offline
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Replenish your electrolytes during and after your workout. A sports drink like Gatorade will do the trick.
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  #20  
Old 12-09-2004, 04:56 AM
Barbarian Barbarian is offline
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If I'm on the push-it-to-the-limit phase of my routine, then yeah, the low energy can linger for the whole week. But this is specifically because I'm pushing my workouts to the limit for that week. If I'm doing a lighter workout (or if I'm splitting upper body/lower body) so my total work output any given day is lower, I'm fine and peppy.
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  #21  
Old 12-09-2004, 05:13 AM
Tiggrkitty Tiggrkitty is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jadis
You know, every time you see people talk about getting into an exercise routine, you invariably see them gush about how great and energized they feel. Am I the only person alive who feels like crap when they work out?

Seriously...exercising doesn't make me feel good. I mean, I know in my *head* that it's good for me, but physically, all it does is make me tired. I can feel proud of the fact that I made the effort, but other than that, there's really no reward. Instead of feeling energized and fit and blah blah blah....all I feel is worn out. And hungry.

Exercising doesn't charge me up for the day, it makes me want to stuff my face and then take a nap.

Am I alone here?
IMACPT

Just right up front it is hard to pin point why you are tired. There just isn't enough information. A lot of things impact workouts and fatigue.

Have you had a physical lately? How often do you work out? How long have you been on your current routine? Do you drink water during exercise? Do you eat balanced meals and if not do you take vitamins and supplements? What is your BMI? Do you know what your target range is and do you stay within that range? How many times a week do you work out? What type of workouts are you doing?

Email me if you want and we can discuss this in more detail.
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  #22  
Old 12-09-2004, 08:14 AM
overlyverbose overlyverbose is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cazzle
I've been the same since childhood. Exercising puts me on a real downer, makes me feel tired, miserable and grumpy. In primary school our teachers used to make us run around the perimetre of the school once a week, and every single time my legs would break out in an itchy red rash.
Some people are actually allergic to exercise:
link. Perhaps you have a problem similar to one of these?

I heard the most common allergy is the exercise-induced rash - it's caused by the rise in body temperature. You can also experience an allergic reaction to something you've consumed that's actually triggered by exercise, which causes the rash, and sometimes anaphylactic shock.
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  #23  
Old 12-09-2004, 10:17 AM
tremorviolet tremorviolet is offline
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How long a period of time have you consistently exercised for? My WAG is that you haven't stuck with an exercise program long enough to see benfits. (I'm basing this on nothing, it's just a guess like I said) In my experience, exercise can make you feel awfulat first. It sometimes takes a month or two (or longer in some cases) to get used to the exercise and start feeling good about it.
Otherwise, maybe you have some other energy limiting thing like a thyroid issue or Epstein-Barr (IANAD, just more wild ass speculation...).
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  #24  
Old 12-09-2004, 11:16 AM
Hello Again Hello Again is offline
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Hve you considered that you might be low in iron? I remember reading (in college at some point I think) that the effect of iron deficiency is disproportionate to the amount of the deficiency. In other words, you can be very slightly deficient but really feel exhausted all the time. If you rarely eat red meat and don't take a multi, I would consider a multivitamin.
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  #25  
Old 12-09-2004, 11:19 AM
don't ask don't ask is offline
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I always tell the exercise junkies at work that I will take up jogging as soon as I see a happy jogger. They all look like they are being tortured.
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  #26  
Old 12-09-2004, 11:56 AM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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Man, I hate working out. Never felt an endorphin rush in myl ife from it. And I once made it all the way through April, so it's not that "just starting" thing. (Right now I'm just restarting, but it feels the same as working out every other fay for fourmonths - awful, in other words.) I do everything I can to make it better - the iPod does help, and having somebody with me does too, but it's still at its core absolutely loathsome. It tires me out, I don't get any sort of energy boost, etc. I do try to eat before and after - especially now when dating an athletic trainer. I know women don't get enough protein so I try to get more. I eat well. I have a good routine, I go to a good gym, etc, etc, etc - I just hate it. I know it's good for me but it makes me feel awful. People are always coming up to me at the gym and asking if I'm okay. (I'm not overweight, either.)

I'm bred to be solely ornamental, I think.
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  #27  
Old 12-09-2004, 12:52 PM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tremorviolet
How long a period of time have you consistently exercised for? My WAG is that you haven't stuck with an exercise program long enough to see benfits. (I'm basing this on nothing, it's just a guess like I said) In my experience, exercise can make you feel awfulat first. It sometimes takes a month or two (or longer in some cases) to get used to the exercise and start feeling good about it.
Otherwise, maybe you have some other energy limiting thing like a thyroid issue or Epstein-Barr (IANAD, just more wild ass speculation...).
I commuted by bicycle for several YEARS -- five days a week, fifty weeks a year. I enjoyed the actual bicycling part, but was always dog-tired afterward, and it was generally all I could do to get through the day, then go home and collapse. My personal feeling is that someday they'll figure out there's some hormone or something that allows some to recover quickly and easily from exercise, while others have problems.
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  #28  
Old 12-11-2004, 07:41 AM
Eliahna Eliahna is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overlyverbose
Some people are actually allergic to exercise:
link. Perhaps you have a problem similar to one of these?

I heard the most common allergy is the exercise-induced rash - it's caused by the rise in body temperature. You can also experience an allergic reaction to something you've consumed that's actually triggered by exercise, which causes the rash, and sometimes anaphylactic shock.
Ok, wow. I've always said I was allergic to exercise - I didn't think it was actually true. Looks like I've got some research to do. Thanks!
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  #29  
Old 05-03-2015, 08:37 PM
oldwest oldwest is offline
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I've learned that when you experience an anomaly, when your body doesn't react the way others' bodies react, those others are constantly explaining what you should be doing or what you're doing wrong, or both. I too learned years ago that, while I was working out with others and doing about the same thing they were doing, they came out of the exercise full of energy, and I came out drained for the rest of the day. I thought I was the only one in the world with that problem, until I happened to hear a co-worker say she had the same problem. I always thought I was the only person in the world for whom coffee is a really fast acting laxative, until, in 1991, I read an article in Time magazine about those people for whom coffee serves as a fast acting laxative. In my senior years, I'm supposed to be using a c-pap machine. Others who use c-paps tell me how much better they feel the morning after. The morning after I use mine, I'm just tired all day. The medical community knows that not everyone reacts to meds the same way, that's why there are multiple meds for the same ailment. But the medical community can't seem to wrap their heads around the fact that we react to other stimuli differently as well. So do your best to find what works for you, avoid those things that don't work for you. Enjoy each day in the best way you can. As a for instance, I've learned I can get my caffeine in pill form. Walking is about the only exercise that works for me, so I park in the outer edges of the parking lots.
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  #30  
Old 05-03-2015, 09:31 PM
guizot guizot is offline
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Originally Posted by Jadis View Post
Seeing as how I need so much sleep in general, exercising in the morning has always been anathema to me. All of my previous gym efforts up until now always revolved around going *after* work. I was tired then, too.

This time around, I've been going to the gym at 6am. Believe me when I say it doesn't help to go in the morning. In a lot of ways, it's probably worse, because I don't want to get out of bed even on good, non-exercising days. Getting up at 6am is its own special little hell.
There are quite a few variables, but it could just be an individual thing, because my situation would account for several of these variables. I swim every morning, from 5:30 to 6:30--2 km, or about 1.25 miles. Furthermore, I don't eat a banana before--I don't eat anything, BUT I drink large mug of black coffee with no sugar, which makes a big difference. And I normally sleep four to five hours. I have to say, that right afterwards I usually feel great. It's the best time of the day. (In the afternoon I usually have to sleep for about 20 minutes, if I really want to be alert, though.) However, occasionally I won't feel good afterwards, and I can't really figure out why. I'm thinking it might have something to do with diet. But I'll say one thing: I've been able to turn this into such a habit that I actually feel bad when I don't swim. (As for the "special little hell"? Well, I totally get that, but you know, once I get through it, the rest of the day is all down hill in comparison.)

I'm wondering, also, how do you swim? I see a lot of people swimming horribly.
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  #31  
Old 05-04-2015, 01:36 AM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
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Originally Posted by Jadis View Post
Oh...and I forgot to mention. Bananas are of the debbil and should be banned from this earth. Where's the vomit smiley when you need one?
You misspelled exercising is...

Last edited by kaylasdad99; 05-04-2015 at 01:37 AM..
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  #32  
Old 05-04-2015, 02:46 AM
edwardcoast edwardcoast is offline
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Originally Posted by Jadis View Post
You know, every time you see people talk about getting into an exercise routine, you invariably see them gush about how great and energized they feel. Am I the only person alive who feels like crap when they work out?

Seriously...exercising doesn't make me feel good. I mean, I know in my *head* that it's good for me, but physically, all it does is make me tired. I can feel proud of the fact that I made the effort, but other than that, there's really no reward. Instead of feeling energized and fit and blah blah blah....all I feel is worn out. And hungry.

Exercising doesn't charge me up for the day, it makes me want to stuff my face and then take a nap.

Am I alone here?
I don't think he does a radio show any longer, but Bruce Williams mentioned that he hated exercise but he did it. He said he would rather clean out a septic tank with a straw than exercise but he did it.

I was delighted to hear him say that, because I hate exercise. And I have all the equipment and all that stuff too. I still hate it, but you know what, after hearing this guy admit he didn't like it but he did it anyway, I finally started to work on figuring out what I hated so much about it.

Then I improved the exercise environment. I set up all the equipment in the basement with two fans. So they blow on me from two directions. I also got a big screen TV with a great sound system. And I DVR things and save the stuff I really like to watch only while I exercise. Then I looked into clothing and realized I didn't have the most comfortable exercise clothing and got that. Yes, all this cost money, but I worked on trying to make it the best I could. Exercise isn't about suffering, it's about the fitness and my body doesn't know my brain is distracted listening to music I love or a TV program I think is great.

Every time I talk to a doctor, every single freaking health concern comes back to lose weight and exercise. So there is no avoiding it.

So after a while of doing this, I become more condition to look forward to the exercise because I can to listen to music I love or watch a program I saved.
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  #33  
Old 05-04-2015, 02:47 AM
edwardcoast edwardcoast is offline
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Originally Posted by Jadis View Post
It's not just around the time of my workout....I expect to be tired after I work out. It's all of the *other* time that I'm talking about. If I work out regularly, during all of the time in which I'm *not* working out, I want to sleep (and eat). I'm tired literally all of the time. I would come home from work and go directly to bed if I could.

Exercising simply does not make me feel better. Not one iota. Not before, after or during.
Sounds like you have some other issue. See your family doctor, maybe you need to have a sleep study done, for example.
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  #34  
Old 05-04-2015, 03:44 AM
Max the Immortal Max the Immortal is offline
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You folks may want to check the timestamps before replying to the OP.

Last edited by Max the Immortal; 05-04-2015 at 03:44 AM..
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  #35  
Old 05-04-2015, 09:41 AM
May 20 May 20 is offline
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I realize this is a zombie thread, but it's so nice to know that I'm not the only one who doesn't get that endorphin rush from exercising, who is utterly worn out because of working out.

I am not alone.
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  #36  
Old 05-04-2015, 11:52 AM
Smeghead Smeghead is online now
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I've never felt good after exercising. I've never felt healthier, more energetic, or happier after extended periods (weeks, months) of regular exercise every day.

In fact, ever since the third grade, heat has given me bad headaches, and that includes the heat induced by exercise.

So, I exercise, because I want my daughters to have their dad in their lives for as long as possible. But every time I step on that treadmill, I just accept that I'm going to have pain throbbing in the back of my head for most of the day until I can kill it with too much Excedrin, after which point I'll have caffeine jitters and, weirdly, dry eyes until bedtime.

It's a bit of an anti-motivator, to be honest.
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  #37  
Old 05-04-2015, 11:55 AM
Lorene89095 Lorene89095 is offline
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Try Alieve.
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  #38  
Old 05-04-2015, 12:03 PM
UncleRojelio UncleRojelio is offline
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I didn't see anywhere that you mention your age but I'll just throw my anecdotal evidence that working out at the age of 50 truly sucks. I try to go to crossfit three times a week and, basically, I'm sore and tired all the time. Not to mention that any gains in muscle mass and/or strength come agonizingly slowly. So, if you are still young, chin up because it never gets any better.
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  #39  
Old 05-04-2015, 12:42 PM
Anaamika Anaamika is offline
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I need to be in this thread, too. I exercise daily and it never makes me feel good. Every day I feel tired, and I do get enough sleep and I know I eat very well - lots of veggies and fruit and enough protein.

I just hate exercise. I wish I could get that rush other people do. Swimming actually makes me feel great but the only pool around here is the Y and it's not very convenient.
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  #40  
Old 05-04-2015, 03:12 PM
JcWoman JcWoman is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2014
I'm an exercise hater, too. In my case, I have arthritis, systemically, and exercise tends to make me ache all over. Not muscle ache, either, it's in my bones.

That and the fact that I find repetitive exercise to be dull as mud, no matter what music, book or tv show I try to distract myself with. I have on rare occasion enjoyed it when an exercise class got turned into an unexpected game. For example I was doing water aerobics a few years ago and when the Olympics were on the teacher made us do our own water-based olympics in one class session. I adored it. But was so sore and tired that I had to skip the next session two days later. I need to work up my intensity gradually to avoid pain, and I need fun and games for motivation, but I've never managed to win the jackpot on both two classes in a row.
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  #41  
Old 05-04-2015, 05:06 PM
Eliahna Eliahna is online now
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Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Victoria, Australia
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Things have changed for me since I posted in 2004. As my health has improved I've been able to exercise more without experiencing the horrible crash in mood that I described. I haven't had a bout of hives after exercising in a long time either, maybe because I'm aware that heat is a trigger for that and I don't allow myself to get to hot. I haven't turned into a fitness junkie but I have incorporated light exercise into my every day life, and recently I even joined a gym. Really recently - I've had five sessions
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  #42  
Old 05-04-2015, 05:54 PM
DSeid DSeid is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2001
FWIW different people really do respond to different sorts of exercise differently.
Quote:
... In a telling study published in March, for instance, 95 older, overweight men and women began five months of endurance or weight training. By the end of that time, the volunteers were, on average, 8 percent stronger or more aerobically fit (depending on which program they had followed). But 13 percent of those in the endurance group had lost aerobic capacity, and 30 percent of those in the strength-training group were weaker. ...
But responding poorly to one sort does not mean that you respond poorly to another sort. If what you are doing makes you feel like crap then try something else. Maybe you do better with HIIT, or with weight training, or ... so on.
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  #43  
Old 05-04-2015, 08:51 PM
razncain razncain is offline
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Iím 56, been running regularly for the last six years, and itís tolerable doing the 5kís and 10kís, lately being going a bit further than that, can't say I really enjoy it that much, and actually I look forward to when Iím done. But thatís when I start to fully appreciate it.

Are others saying they donít feel any afterglow effect at all? I donít feel any runners high while actually running, maybe I'd have to go further to experience that, but I certainly can feel what must be lots of chemicals being released in my body and brain, I feel it in my face, lungs, just pretty much all over, and it lasts for many hours. If I didnít get that, I wouldnít do it. It affects my mood tremendously for the better.
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  #44  
Old 05-04-2015, 08:58 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is online now
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Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bangkok
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jadis View Post
You know, every time you see people talk about getting into an exercise routine, you invariably see them gush about how great and energized they feel. Am I the only person alive who feels like crap when they work out?

Seriously...exercising doesn't make me feel good. I mean, I know in my *head* that it's good for me, but physically, all it does is make me tired. I can feel proud of the fact that I made the effort, but other than that, there's really no reward. Instead of feeling energized and fit and blah blah blah....all I feel is worn out. And hungry.

Exercising doesn't charge me up for the day, it makes me want to stuff my face and then take a nap.

Am I alone here?
I could have written this OP myself. I tried running as a young buck. People kept telling me it would get to where I'd enjoy it. Kept at it every day for several weeks, almost two months, before saying Fuck It and throwing in the towel. Same with working out in the gym. Hated it. It just made me feel like Death Warmed Over. Got all kinds of advice about what to do and how, but finally I just had to say Fuck It.

The only form of exercise I've ever thoroughly enjoyed was bicycle riding. Did it all the time in Hawaii, but it had the advantage of getting me places, it wasn't just a seemingly senseless waste of time. But the climate over here is too oppressive for bike riding, particularly in this blast furnace called Bangkok, so I hung up my wheels when I moved back to Thailand.
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  #45  
Old 05-05-2015, 07:38 AM
kiz kiz is online now
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Oh look zombie thread! Wonder if Jadis knows about it?

Swimming is the only exercise I've done which makes me wonderfully exhausted afterward. Buoyancy has a lot to do with it because you don't quite realize how hard your muscles are working while you're working them. I did water therapy after my knee accident a couple of years ago and I'd emerge from the pool utterly drained even though I didn't really swim. Just a theory

I used to walk 5-6 miles daily up until my work schedule became so convoluted that it was too much trouble to try to carve out time. Now I've got arthritis, bone spurs, and other age-related aches and pains which cause me to move slower...I mean, I could probably still do those 5-6 miles but it'd take me twice as long to do so now and that doesn't really appeal to me My dogs, OTOH, wouldn't care!
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  #46  
Old 05-05-2015, 08:56 AM
gallows fodder gallows fodder is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSeid View Post
FWIW different people really do respond to different sorts of exercise differently.But responding poorly to one sort does not mean that you respond poorly to another sort. If what you are doing makes you feel like crap then try something else. Maybe you do better with HIIT, or with weight training, or ... so on.
This certainly is true for me. Up until last year, the only type of physical activity that I had ever engaged in -- from childhood until adulthood -- was cardio. I tried to do the Couch-to-5K program a few years ago and got stuck at Week 3 for weeks until I gave up. I just couldn't get past that hump, and the experience of running was horrible. My lungs burned, I broke out in hives, my energy level would conk out before 20 minutes, and I was miserable. Competitive sports have always been a no-go because I didn't have the cardio endurance to keep up with the team. So I basically spent my life as a couch potato.

Then I started weight training, and it's an entirely different story. I feel great the entire time, I feel energized, I'm motivated to push myself further. In a year (with summer and winter break off), I put almost 200 pounds on my deadlift (I'm a woman, btw). Last night I lifted 220 lbs and was ecstatic. I love how being strong helps me out in my everyday life, and I want to keep going to the gym. And funnily enough, weight training has improved my cardio endurance without even trying.

I used to think weight training sounded unbelievably boring and tedious (you lift heavy things so....you can lift heavier things? Repeat ad nauseam? WTF), but I love it.

Running still makes me feel like crap, though.
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  #47  
Old 05-05-2015, 02:58 PM
Smeghead Smeghead is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorene89095 View Post
Try Alieve.
I've been dealing with this for the best part of three decades. There is very little that I have not already tried.
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  #48  
Old 05-05-2015, 03:07 PM
Living Well Is Best Revenge Living Well Is Best Revenge is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2011
I can relate. I play competitive tennis and am now 40 years old. Something always hurts and I am perpetually tired and sore. Sometimes I wonder why I do this to myself and how much longer I can keep it up.
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  #49  
Old 05-05-2015, 03:49 PM
Bill Door Bill Door is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2003
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I tried running, I really did, but the olives kept flying right out of my Martini.
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  #50  
Old 05-07-2015, 07:30 AM
WOOKINPANUB WOOKINPANUB is offline
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Join Date: May 2005
When I saw the thread title I thought it was going to be about feeling nauseated after working out. I didn't see anyone mention it yet but does anyone else feel pukey after exercise? I don't think I eat too close to my workout - usually no less than an hour- and I drink plenty of water. Maybe too much water? It's a bummer to put so much effort into staying healthy and then fighting to keep from hurling all the way home.
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