The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > General Questions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-14-2005, 02:17 PM
Wesley Clark Wesley Clark is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
What are the health consequences of too much phosphorus

If a person drinks alot of soda and gets what I assume is alot of phosphorus in their system are there any health consequences to that or does diet soda not contain enough to do anything negative.
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 01-14-2005, 03:27 PM
WhyNot WhyNot is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Sweet Home Chicago
Posts: 30,308
Too much phosphorus is hard on the left kidney (not the right, if you have both) and can lead to "osteoporosis, arthritis, gout, dental problems (loose teeth, caries), skin eruptions, lowered WBC, higher risk for several cancers, kidney stones."

From this site (bolding mine):
Quote:
Phosphorus, when high in ratio to calcium, is well established as being a contributing factor with bone loss / osteoporosis, and many articles have been published on the dangers of consuming too many soft drinks because of their high phosphorus content. A similar message is being preached regarding protein, supposedly having the same effect on calcium loss. Forgetting about the heated hype (agenda) for a moment, any viewpoint can be correct for specific individuals, but it cannot be applied for the masses as there are as many people who exhibit below- normal protein / phosphates, as are those who are above-normal, so only individual assessments are valid. Osteoporosis and arthritic conditions can develop with high and low protein / phosphate levels, which subsequently rules out "one-fits-all"- types of recommendations.
My WAG would be that for someone with a strong, healthy, efficient left kidney, the kidney can handle the stress of extra phosphorus in the diet, and the body simply excretes it as nature intended. If the kidney isn't so strong or efficient, bad things happen. If you have any of the medical conditions listed above, perhaps those would be warning signs that your own particular body isn't handling extra phosphorus so well.

So I guess the answer is "maybe, maybe not, check with your doctor."
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-14-2005, 05:05 PM
KarlGauss KarlGauss is offline
Out of the slimy mud of words
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Between pole and tropic
Posts: 6,868
I am unaware of any normal metabolic process for which there is a significant difference between the left and right kidneys. The site is just plain wrong (about the left and right kidney business. And it overstates the connection between dietary phosphate intake and osteoporosis).
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-14-2005, 05:13 PM
ParentalAdvisory ParentalAdvisory is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlGauss
I am unaware of any normal metabolic process for which there is a significant difference between the left and right kidneys.
Yeah, I wondered about this too. It's not like your system is saying, "Yo, left Kidney, you take the coca-cola, and the right, well... you just sit back and wait for the brownies."
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-14-2005, 05:51 PM
SavageNarce SavageNarce is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
What are the health consequences of too much phosphorus?

You have to wear a sandwich board that says "Close cover before striking"?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-14-2005, 09:53 PM
KarlGauss KarlGauss is offline
Out of the slimy mud of words
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Between pole and tropic
Posts: 6,868
After posting my response above, and having a bit more time, I wanted to shore up my comment that "the connection between dietary phosphate intake and osteoporosis was overstated".

In fact, there does not seem to be any convincing evidence that high intake of dietary phosphate promotes osteoporosis (in people with normal kidneys).

The current state of affairs in this regard was nicely summed up last year by Heaney in the Mayo Clinic Procedings, from which I quote:
Quote:
... phosphorus has been indicted in the genesis of osteoporosis,1 even if not convincingly, and the phosphorus content of colas, despite the lack of convincing evidence that they exert any harmful effects,2 has been cited repeatedly as the means whereby carbonated beverages may contribute to the genesis of bony fragility.3 Interestingly, orange juice has essentially the same phosphorus content as colas, and in countries with calcium fortification of orange juice, the phosphorus content may rise to 5 times that of a typical cola. To my knowledge, there has been no concern raised about the harmful effects of orange juice on the skeleton.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.