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  #1  
Old 02-01-2005, 12:20 PM
snow snow is offline
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What does the Nabisco logo represent?

old logo
older logo
newer logo

Too early to be a TV aerial. Is it an Eastern cross?
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  #2  
Old 02-01-2005, 12:53 PM
RumMunkey RumMunkey is offline
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According to this site, it's:
"The colophon, the symbol for Nabisco, is a trademark usually placed on the title page of a book or as an inscription at the end of a book giving facts pertaining to publication."

-And if you look close it's on the face of the oreo Itself.

And though I can't confirm it, it appears that a company called "Colophon Company Limited" is a holding of Nabisco (now Kraft). And since Google tells me that Nabisco was created as an amalgamation of several bakers, I would wager an estimated guess that the "Colophon Company Limited" was one of the companies that joined to form Nabisco originally. -But's that's just a guess.
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  #3  
Old 02-01-2005, 01:37 PM
Gary "Wombat" Robson Gary "Wombat" Robson is offline
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Just for the record, RumMunkey, "colophon" is a generic term for any trademark or symbol placed on the title page of a book--it doesn't refer just to Nabisco's logo or any other specific symbol.
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  #4  
Old 02-01-2005, 02:21 PM
Asteroide Asteroide is offline
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It looks like a "croix de lorraine". Maybe there's some historical connection ?
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  #5  
Old 02-01-2005, 02:53 PM
Dignan Dignan is offline
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I'm drawing a blank right now, but I am almost certain that I remember reading an explanation for the symbol in Barbarians At The Gates, the book about the RJR Nabisco takeover in the late 1980's. Maybe someone else remembers, or it at least provides someone with a lead.
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  #6  
Old 02-01-2005, 03:01 PM
Mister Rik Mister Rik is offline
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Well just look at the darn thing! The original logo contains the full name, "Nabisco", in its shape!

Lookie:

www.phase42.net/nabisco.jpg
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  #7  
Old 02-01-2005, 03:06 PM
Sunspace Sunspace is offline
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I always thought it was from the Fifties, influenced by TV antennas and space and orbital paths, what we would now call retro-futuristic, like the design of props in the (later) Jetsons cartoon. I<m surprised to see that it's older than that.
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  #8  
Old 02-01-2005, 03:19 PM
zut zut is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phase42
Well just look at the darn thing! The original logo contains the full name, "Nabisco", in its shape!

Lookie:

www.phase42.net/nabisco.jpg
Well, yeah, but by the same logic, it also contains the full word, "labia," in its shape. Just saying.
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  #9  
Old 02-01-2005, 03:21 PM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Heh, kind of appropriate that I should reply to this thread. However, frustratingly I can't remember the exact details. What I do remember is that back in the 1980s (?), a certain pack of Nabisco brand biscuits featured an explanation of the red-triangle device (i.e. this version). Unfortunately I can't even remember which type of bicuits it was on

It certainly wouldn't have been Oreos, as we didn't have them in the UK until quite recently. I think it was a savoury cracker...
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  #10  
Old 02-01-2005, 03:44 PM
Flander Flander is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phase42
Well just look at the darn thing! The original logo contains the full name, "Nabisco", in its shape!

Lookie:

www.phase42.net/nabisco.jpg
Is that the intent of the logo design? There are a number of words you can spell with that formula!

Check it out, I can spell "BOOB"!!!
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  #11  
Old 02-01-2005, 03:54 PM
dqa dqa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flander
Is that the intent of the logo design? There are a number of words you can spell with that formula!
Whoosh!
The N, B, and C are on that logo because they stand for the National Biscuit Company.
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  #12  
Old 02-01-2005, 04:10 PM
yabob yabob is online now
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To take it back a little further, it seems that the figure appeared on the original packaging for "Uneeda Biscuits", the first product sold by the National Biscuit Company in 1898:

http://www.kraft.com/100/innovations/uneeda.html

Note that the lettering inside was different, then used to promote their new "inner seal" packaging to keep the crackers fresh.
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  #13  
Old 02-01-2005, 04:32 PM
yabob yabob is online now
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Another interesting tidbit from a page about the Roycroft Community, a late 19th centery artisan's guild which also used the colophon:

Quote:
What is the meaning of the circle and cross that are on many Roycroft items and the pages of this site?

The mark is commonly referred to as the Roycroft orb or simply 'the Orb.' The basic shape, minus the inserted "R," is a medieval colophon with which monks ended their manuscripts in order to signify they had done the work to the best of their ability. Hubbard used the mark with an inserted "R" to signify Roycroft, as both a shop mark and as part of the general medieval craftsman ambiance he was trying to engender. It should also be pointed out the Italian papermaking firm, Cartiera Magnani, one of the most respected paper mills in Europe dating its origins back to the 15th century, used and uses today, a very similar 'orb' as their mark. Did Elbert first learn of and lift the symbol from Cartiera Magnani, then slightly modify it to avoid trademark infringement, since he probably would have been aware of Magnani due to his 'involvement' in the book arts? That answer is buried at the bottom of the Irish Sea. As to the supposed spiritual significance of the Orb, Elbert gave various explanations. (Some "authority" on Antiques Roadshow said it signified the hand of God over the world. Pick an explanantion...any explanation.) Interesting to note, Nabisco also used the same mark, but substituted an "N" for the Roycroft "R." (And does to this day, check any Oreos cookie.) A lawsuit resulted over the mark which ended with an out-of-court settlement in which Nabisco promised never to publish books and Roycroft promised never to make biscuits. Roycroft did, however, later make and sell Maple Pecan Patties.
Bolding mine. I would hazard a guess than one of the founders of Nabisco was aware of the derivation of the symbol from the middle ages as some sort of a mark of quality, and it simply appealed to him.
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  #14  
Old 02-01-2005, 07:06 PM
ianzin ianzin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon
What I do remember is that back in the 1980s (?), a certain pack of Nabisco brand biscuits featured an explanation of the red-triangle device. Unfortunately I can't even remember which type of bicuits it was on
I'm from the UK too, and the logo appeared on the side of Shredded Wheat boxes, at least as far back as the late 60s. From memory, the blurb said little more than that the red triangle had been used for a long time by merchants as a symbol of quality. It didn't get around to explaining the 'antennae' aspect of the corporate symbolism.

I expect that the symbol is probably part of a very large conspiracy involving big companies, big money, geo-political power struggles and the Da Vinci code. Anyone who denies this is, of course, part of the conspiracy and just trying to cover up.
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  #15  
Old 02-01-2005, 07:13 PM
jayjay jayjay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dqa
Whoosh!
The N, B, and C are on that logo because they stand for the National Biscuit Company.
Incidentally, for those who haven't quite made the connection, National Biscuit Company...
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  #16  
Old 02-01-2005, 08:18 PM
Tripler Tripler is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zut
Well, yeah, but by the same logic, it also contains the full word, "labia," in its shape. Just saying.
Well, given the suggestive advertising on the Oreo cookie, I can only say one thing:

I just knew there was something I was supposed to lick in the middle!

Tripler
:: ducks and runs ::
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  #17  
Old 02-01-2005, 10:15 PM
Flander Flander is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dqa
Whoosh!
The N, B, and C are on that logo because they stand for the National Biscuit Company.



Sorry, all I could think of was "boob". I'm sure you understand.



boobies
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  #18  
Old 02-01-2005, 10:26 PM
soulburnz soulburnz is offline
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I was googling Lorna Doone cookies to see how old of a logo was on them and came up with this link mentioning the Straight Dope and Cecil. Interesting.
http://ask.yahoo.com/ask/20020425.html
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  #19  
Old 02-02-2005, 07:59 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ianzin
I'm from the UK too, and the logo appeared on the side of Shredded Wheat boxes, at least as far back as the late 60s. From memory, the blurb said little more than that the red triangle had been used for a long time by merchants as a symbol of quality. It didn't get around to explaining the 'antennae' aspect of the corporate symbolism.
I came back to this thread to say "Shredded Wheat", because it suddenly came to me last night that that's what I was thinking of -- the biscuit link was a red herring. However I think you are right that it only explained the red triangle part of the logo.

Quote:
I expect that the symbol is probably part of a very large conspiracy involving big companies, big money, geo-political power struggles and the Da Vinci code. Anyone who denies this is, of course, part of the conspiracy and just trying to cover up.
Now I'm certain you're right.
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  #20  
Old 02-02-2005, 08:11 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ianzin
I expect that the symbol is probably part of a very large conspiracy involving big companies, big money, geo-political power struggles and the Da Vinci code. Anyone who denies this is, of course, part of the conspiracy and just trying to cover up.
Actually, you may be closer than you think
Quote:
Page 170 corresponds to September 11, 2001. On that page there is an ad for Philadelphia cream cheese with a recipe for

OREO CHEESECAKE

In this phrase there are two Os and five Es, corresponding to the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center and the five sides of the Pentagon building.

Philadelphia cream cheese is produced by the Kraft company. The "Craft" is another word for Freemasonry.

"Philadelphia" in Greek means "brotherly love", a concealed reference to
the Masonic Brotherhood, the Craft.

Oreo cookies are produced by Nabisco, a Kraft subsidiary...

Nabisco's logo is a red triangle, emblematic of the Scottish Rite of Masonry, also known as Red Masonry. The Nabisco triangle is topped by a double cross, the symbol of a 33rd degree Scottish Rite Mason.

You see, it all makes sense...
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  #21  
Old 02-02-2005, 08:37 AM
Squink Squink is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon
What I do remember is that back in the 1980s ... (i.e. this version)
Nabisco filed for a US trademark on that (the antennaed oval with the word nabisco inside) on November 7, 1955.
The only earlier Nabisco trademark (september 1901) is for the word Nabisco in an outline font, no oval, no antenna.
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  #22  
Old 02-02-2005, 09:26 AM
FatBaldGuy FatBaldGuy is offline
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According to this link the Nabisco colophon logo was first introduced in 1900 (scroll to the bottom of the page).
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  #23  
Old 02-02-2005, 09:50 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Quote:
from yabob's quote:
It should also be pointed out the Italian papermaking firm, Cartiera Magnani, one of the most respected paper mills in Europe dating its origins back to the 15th century, used and uses today, a very similar 'orb' as their mark.
For comparison, Cartiera Magnani's current logo. The company celebrated their 600th (!)anniversary last year.
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  #24  
Old 02-02-2005, 12:21 PM
ianzin ianzin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon
Now I'm certain you're right.
Of course, anyone who rather glibly asserts that my conspiracy theory is right is also part of the conspiracy. Such people are clearly trying to undermine my credibility by treating the suggestion in a seemingly humorous, light-hearted or offhand manner. Non-conspiracists would, of course, assert that the conspiracy is false.
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  #25  
Old 02-02-2005, 05:00 PM
HeyHomie HeyHomie is offline
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I'm on hold with Public Relations at Kraft Foods right now. (Eat your heart out, Cecil Adams!) I'll let you all know what they say as soon as I get some results. Beautiful hold music, by the way. Sounds vaguely like Yanni.

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OK, according to "Cole" at Public Relations at Kraft Foods, the circle and two crosses is a symbol dating from the 15th century. It was used by the Society of Printers in Venice, Italy. (That would explain the similar logo on the Italian paper maker, linked above). He was unaware of the signifigance of the double cross, but stated that it's most likely related to Christianity. He was unable to state how the National Biscuit Company came to use it. "Probably one of the original bakers used Italian paper."

Hope this helps!
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