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  #1  
Old 06-01-2005, 10:51 AM
Anaamika Anaamika is offline
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Can one person own a car and another insure it? (In NYS, but anywhere)

If their is no relation between the two people? Can this be done?
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  #2  
Old 06-01-2005, 10:58 AM
Nava Nava is offline
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In Spain, yes.

Insurance here is always for the car, not the driver, and so long as you can present the papers for the car the insurance company lets you buy insurance for it.
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  #3  
Old 06-01-2005, 11:46 AM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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If they are in the same "household", then they can even have one combined policy- well, it's two policies, but one bill, and there is a nice discoutn involved. You don't have to be related to be in the same household, you can be "roomies".
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  #4  
Old 06-01-2005, 11:48 AM
sunfish sunfish is offline
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From the NYS DMV website:

Quote:
What are the requirements for motor vehicle liability insurance in NYS?

A motor vehicle registered in NYS must have liability insurance. Insurance coverage must be a minimum of $25,000/50,000 for injury, $50,000/100,000 for death, and $10,000 for property damage caused by any one accident. New York State is a no-fault state. The liability coverage must remain in effect while the registration is valid, even if the vehicle is not used (except motorcycles).
  • The liability coverage must be NYS insurance coverage, issued by a company authorized to do business in NYS and licensed by the NYS Insurance Department. Out-of-state insurance coverage of any type is NEVER acceptable or valid. If your vehicle is registered in NYS, the liability insurance coverage must be NYS insurance coverage.
  • Liability coverage must be issued in the name of the registrant and must remain in the name of the registrant at all times. A change on the insurance to a name different from the registrant causes a lapse in insurance coverage, and the driver license of the registrant and the registration is suspended.
  • You must show a NYS Insurance Identification Card when you apply for a vehicle registration. The Insurance Identification Card can be a copy or a fax if the barcode is clear so that a DMV scanner can read the barcode. The insurance company must also file an electronic notice of insurance coverage with the DMV to verify the liability coverage. (The agent or broker cannot file this notice.) If a police officer requests your proof of insurance, you must show your Insurance ID Card. Your Insurance ID Card and the electronic notice of insurance coverage together verify your insurance coverage. An Insurance ID Card only does not prove liability coverage.
Emphasis mine. So the insurance must be in the name of the registered owner; you can't split the responsibility.

If you're trying to get a multi-car discount, see if your insurance company won't consider two cars from the same household together for that purpose.
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  #5  
Old 06-01-2005, 11:56 AM
The Great Sun Jester The Great Sun Jester is offline
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Depends. If you are insuring the car for physical damage (collision, theft, etc.) alone, no. Because you can’t ethically put yourself in a position to gain financially from someone else’s loss. For example, an insurer can’t agree to pay YOU for damage that happens to MY car, because you have no INSURABLE INTEREST—you lose nothing if my car gets wrecked.

But if you’re talking about liability, then it depends. Usually, yes, you can do it. One of a couple ways. If the car belongs to Mr. Snuffy, he can lend it to you for a brief period and you will have coverage IF his policy covers permissive users. That depends on the insurance company. If Mr. Snuffy says, “Here, use my car for an indefinite period.” Then there are a couple ways you can handle this. The BEST way that comes to mind would be to have a policy issued in the names of “Mr. Snuffy and Anaamika.” That way if something happens to the car, his interest is covered as any physical damage settlements will include him as a payee. If you accidentally run over a kid, you will be covered for liability. Additionally, should Mr. Snuffy be sued for negligent entrustment of the vehicle to you (he knew you were an habitual drunkard but loaned you the car anyway) he will be covered.

And now: insurance laws and coverage specifics vary from state to state & company to company, speak to a local insurance professional about the details pertaining to your particular situation, etc. etc.

And see sunfish's exquisite bit of research.
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  #6  
Old 06-01-2005, 12:20 PM
dlack dlack is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunfish
From the NYS DMV website:



Emphasis mine. So the insurance must be in the name of the registered owner; you can't split the responsibility.

If you're trying to get a multi-car discount, see if your insurance company won't consider two cars from the same household together for that purpose.
In NYS, the insurance must be in the name of the <i>registrant</i>, who isn't necessarily the <i>owner</i>.

The owner is the person whose name is on the title. That person can allow someone else to register the vehicle (get plates). The person who registers it must get insurance in their name. I've done this before.

I'm certain that this isn't universal and that other states will be different. I believe in some states the plates transfer with ownership, for example.
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  #7  
Old 06-01-2005, 12:32 PM
Anaamika Anaamika is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2001
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlack
In NYS, the insurance must be in the name of the <i>registrant</i>, who isn't necessarily the <i>owner</i>.

The owner is the person whose name is on the title. That person can allow someone else to register the vehicle (get plates). The person who registers it must get insurance in their name. I've done this before.

.
Ok, I can deal with this. Thank you for your help! I called the DMV and I have nothing more to say to them other than the title of my Pit thread sometime ago: They should be reamed with a planet-sized chainsaw.
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  #8  
Old 06-01-2005, 02:09 PM
sunfish sunfish is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dlack
In NYS, the insurance must be in the name of the <i>registrant</i>, who isn't necessarily the <i>owner</i>.

The owner is the person whose name is on the title. That person can allow someone else to register the vehicle (get plates). The person who registers it must get insurance in their name. I've done this before.
You're right, I conflated owner with registrant by mistake. My bad.

Anaamika, you should know by now - never ever call the DMV. The DMV web pages probably have most of the info and forms you will ever need, without your having to interact with the drones, er, employees.
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