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  #1  
Old 07-23-2005, 02:52 PM
Plan B Plan B is offline
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Are West Coast people different than East Coast people?

I'm thinking of moving to San Diego. Every so often someone will say that they moved to California but didn't like it because of the people. I visited recently and the people didn't seem that different to me, but then again it was all limited to superficial chatting around tourist areas.

Is there anything to this? Should we be concerned that the people will be different and we might not get along? I'd be interested in hearing any stories from anyone who has moved in either direction, and found a difference or didn't find a difference.
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  #2  
Old 07-23-2005, 03:13 PM
Hyperelastic Hyperelastic is offline
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I moved from the Midwest to San Francisco and then Los Angeles. I find California natives to be generally more immature and childlike than adults from other parts of the country. That can manifest itself in both bad and good ways. On the one hand, they tend to be more open, friendly and optimistic. On the other hand, they can be selfish, rude and shortsighted. Brought to you by the Department of Overarching Generalizations.
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  #3  
Old 07-23-2005, 03:45 PM
ouryL ouryL is offline
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West coast people lean on the left, while...
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  #4  
Old 07-23-2005, 03:47 PM
Kyla Kyla is offline
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I'm from California and moved east (although not all the way to the coast). I haven't noticed any real difference. Californians are in general a little more laid back, I think, but that certainly doesn't always hold true; there are plenty of uptight Californians. And as a whole, New Yorkers in particular seem a little more tightly wound than what I am used to, not sure if other East Coast people share that characteristic.

When it comes to friendliness, I think Midwesterners take the cake. Stand around looking confused on a streetcorner in Chicago for more than thirty seconds, and someone will ask if you need any help.
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  #5  
Old 07-23-2005, 03:49 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Hard to articulate, but oh, yeah. We're a lot different out here than people who come from the East (hereafter refered to as the "Wrong" Coast). My wife was born and raised in Boston, so I see and experience the differences daily. People from back East have no concept of how BIG the West is. We have a car culture that people who live in big cities with mass transit can't fathom. We are guided by the Sun, and know deep in our hearts that the Sun sets into the sea, it does not rise from the sea.
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  #6  
Old 07-23-2005, 04:09 PM
Ink a dink a dink Ink a dink a dink is offline
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I come from the East Coast originally. Then I lived in the midwest for 12 years. Now I am on the West Coast.

East Coasters are always in a rush, will pull out mace if you ask the time, never smile, and are generally rougher in personality (I speak of NYC, which I love, but it does have it's deawbacks - admit it.)

The Midwest is polite, laid back, people make room for you on the highway, people smile and say "hello", generosity seems more common-place, and while you can get some rednecks, the folks I met were among some of the best I've known.

The West Coast, folks to me seem to have a sense of entitlement. Like, "I am driving, so this is MY lane, no matter that you were signallying to merge". They've got an over-developed sense of being catered to - walk into a grocery store and tell me you can't see that. They don't seem as friendly. They seem more cliquish and harder to break into. It seems more about what you have to offer than about who you are. And Og-forbid you say hello...you either get odd stares, ignoring you, or simply - nothing. Only twice have I had people say "hello" or "good morning" back, in two years. And politeness - forget it. West Coasters were not raised with basic manners. "Thank you" seems to have gone the way of the dinosaur. "Please" is unheard of. I could go on.

But it is lovely. It made me cry with the beauty out here. I don't think the folks who live here appreciate it.

Just my two pennies, but I am also depressed, so it may color it.

Respectfully, Inky.
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  #7  
Old 07-23-2005, 05:05 PM
Gary Robson Gary Robson is offline
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I think the big town/small town difference is far more pronounced than the east coast/west coast difference. There are differences, though.

The east coasters (from D.C. on up north) seemed much more likely to look down on this Colorado boy because my town was only 100 years old and "had no history." I found a lot of "culture snobs" when working in Boston, D.C., and New York City. People seemed more tense and less tolerant. I was anxious to leave.

The west coasters (specifically Californians) were quite accepting of outsiders. I had no problem fitting in and getting along out there. Maybe it's because so many of them are "outsiders" themselves. Californians outside of the big cities seemed a lot more relaxed to me.

The people in small towns seem pretty similar all over the country.
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  #8  
Old 07-23-2005, 06:14 PM
Tehanu Tehanu is offline
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I grew up in Seattle, moved to DC, hung out in NYC, and am currently living in Portland, Oregon. I think West Coast people are more laid back, and less worried about precision in human interaction. I like the sense of particularness I get from people on the East Coast. I like the idea that things have a time and place, and people respect that.
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  #9  
Old 07-23-2005, 06:52 PM
BobT BobT is offline
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I think the principal difference between people from the West and East Coasts is that West Coast residents have a greater tendency to have been born elsewhere. We residents of the West Coast don't have a good sense of the history of where we grew up. We tend not to know our neighbors or care about local politics.

San Diegans probably care about local politics since the city has gone through two mayors in about six weeks because of scandals.

There will be a special election to pick a new one. The first mayor who resigned probably didn't receive the most votes anyway. It's a very long story.
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  #10  
Old 07-23-2005, 08:49 PM
ParentalAdvisory ParentalAdvisory is offline
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Well, if we're going to generalize...

I can only speak on the matter of working with business people over the phone. The north east coast folks seem very uptight and demanding. Where as talking with those on the south west coast, seem more relaxed, dude.
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  #11  
Old 07-23-2005, 09:18 PM
amarinth amarinth is offline
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Absolutely.

I tried to the east coast; it was not for me. Not at all.
I cannot exactly define what it is, but the people (or at least their mannerisms, customs, and the ways they interact with each other and with you) are very, very different.
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  #12  
Old 07-23-2005, 11:06 PM
Fritz Fritz is offline
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I moved to Ventura County two years ago after having spent most of my life in the Southeast - between Virginia and Georgia, and I find that there's a marked difference between East and West.
In general, I see that Californians are more selfish, self-centered, cold and rude than those in the Southeast.
Laid back? No...that was how I expected SoCal to be, but I see just the opposite.

A very small example that always raises my hackles: I see far more people, here in my area, that unload their shopping carts in a supermarket parking lot and just leave them anywhere, usually blocking or partially blocking a parking space next to their car. They just can't be bothered to return them to the corrals.

Does this happen in the Southeast? Sure, but it seems far more rampant here in SoCal.
There are assholes everywhere, but it seems that there are more in SoCal than anywhere I've ever been. Perhaps it's worse in the Northeast.

YMMV, of course. I'm just comparing where I've been to where I am now.
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  #13  
Old 07-24-2005, 12:12 AM
Ashes, Ashes Ashes, Ashes is offline
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I'm going to second that the major difference is big city/small town and not so much which coast. People who live in big cities on the west coast remind me of those who live in big cities on the east coast. They're often rude, cold, selfish, etc., but in different ways. Someone from New York can be rude when they interrupt while you're speaking. People from the West coast can be rude when they just stop listening. I know I put up a wall around myself when I lived in a big west coast city. It was safer and cut down on the overwhelming stimulus of living in a big city. From what I've seen, a lot of big city east coasters do the same.

People in small towns are generally more friendly seeming with their 'hellos' and 'have a nice days'. Just try moving to a small town and trying to actually become a part of the community, though. After four years at a small town high school I was still an outsider. I was just from one town over-- the poor kid from Israel never had a chance. But there is more politeness and such, to your face, than you'll find in a big city.
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  #14  
Old 07-24-2005, 08:20 AM
Madd Maxx Madd Maxx is offline
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Yeah, they are three hours behind us.
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  #15  
Old 07-24-2005, 10:52 AM
Binarydrone Binarydrone is offline
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I moved here from Vermont about 4 years ago. I have also lived in the Midwest (Kansas City, mostly) and in Boston, New York City and briefly parts of Main. Here is what I have found:

The people here all feel like they have some weird internal hidden agenda. While they are, for the most part, unfailingly polite you get the feeling that this is not an emotion that runs very deep at all. Back east, I could pretty much count on knowing just what any given person thought of me? Here? Who knows?

I totally agree with the sense of entitlement mentioned earlier. I would also add that I find the people here to be pretty passive-aggressive. I have also found that I have a much tougher time meeting people and making friends here than I have anywhere else (although that could be because I am different than they are).

You will also notice a lot of little things that are odd to you. For example, back home you could walk into a café in the morning for your cup o mud and see a dozen people in front of you and not even worry about it because they were all just getting a cup of coffee. Here, if you have more than 2 people ahead of you it is a certainty that you are going to be late for work because they are all going to be having some time consuming to make stupid pretentious concoction.

I have often fantasized of starting a social club for transplanted easterners here.

It sure is pretty, though and for me at least you just can't beat the weather.
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  #16  
Old 07-24-2005, 11:11 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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I'm not sure of the West Coast, and larger cities, but people in rural areas, and the 'West' seem to get up earlier. Go to bed earlier.

Today, Sunday, my Wife got up at 5am to meet a friend to take the dogs for a walk. I got up a 6am.

Call me after 9pm on a weekday, and you won't find a very happy camper. Really, if it's after 8pm, it had better be important.
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  #17  
Old 07-24-2005, 11:37 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ink a dink a dink
The West Coast, folks to me seem to have a sense of entitlement. Like, "I am driving, so this is MY lane, no matter that you were signallying to merge".
I think I'll disagree with this. I've done a lot of driving in SoCal. On the motorcycle, most people will make room fo you to split lanes. In a car, I've been let into a lane more often than I've been blocked. I think people in SoCal understand who frustrating it is on the freeways, and they'll cut you a little slack.

But it does help if you're a little assertive. Nothing pisses a SoCal driver off more than someone who doesn't seem to know what he's doing.

On the other hand, I've named Oregon (a Left Coast state) 'Driver's Purgatory'. People there seem not to know how to drive, and IME they infrequently will be courteous enough to let faster traffic pass. Up here in NoWA, everyone seems to drive 5 mph below the speed limit -- no matter what the speed limit is. I'm in constant fear of driving into a 5 mph zone, and being stuck behind people who are stopped!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ink a dink a dink
They don't seem as friendly. They seem more cliquish and harder to break into. It seems more about what you have to offer than about who you are. And Og-forbid you say hello...you either get odd stares, ignoring you, or simply - nothing. Only twice have I had people say "hello" or "good morning" back, in two years.
I think this is true. If you talk to a stranger, they immediately want to know what the hell you want. You're probably going to ask for money. New Orleans is the friendliest place I've been.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ink a dink a dink
And politeness - forget it. West Coasters were not raised with basic manners. "Thank you" seems to have gone the way of the dinosaur. "Please" is unheard of. I could go on.
Maybe I'm weird, then. I was raised to be polite.
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Originally Posted by Ink a dink a dink
But it is lovely. It made me cry with the beauty out here. I don't think the folks who live here appreciate it.
Interesting. I've lived by the water in San Diego and L.A., and I've lived in the Mojave Desert. Many are the days when I've been blown away by a beautiful sunrise or sunset; and I started a thread about The Desert in MPSIMS a week or so ago.

On the other hand, many people in SoCal may never have left the cities. To these people, Nature is something to be looked at; not experienced.
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  #18  
Old 07-24-2005, 01:39 PM
Hunter Hawk Hunter Hawk is offline
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What Binarydrone said. There's a saying that if you move to Seattle from the East Coast, you'd better bring your friends with you, 'cuz you're not gonna make any new ones. I've also found that's it's curiously easy to drop out of contact with friends I've made here.

There also seems to be an odd lack of spontaneity in people--anything you want to do, you have to plan three weeks in advance. And if you're planning a party, for example, you need to invite about three times the number of people you want to actually show up.
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  #19  
Old 07-24-2005, 02:16 PM
Manatee Manatee is offline
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Yeah, we are.

We know that it should be "from," not "than."
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  #20  
Old 07-24-2005, 03:00 PM
even sven even sven is offline
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This is facinating. Here in California, the general consensus on East Coasters is that they are rude and aggressive. We consider them uptight, pushy, too rushed, and cliqueish. We also think they are too obsessed with money and too ready to go to any length to get the career (husband, kids, look, service) that they "need".

Anyway, I think that what we have here is not a set of values that one side is living up to or missing, but rather a bunch of miscommunication. I know Californians arn't all rude. I get plenty of smiles on the street, help from total strangers and "god bless you"s from the homeless. I think we are just miscommunicating....our codes for "nice" read to you guys as "rude" and vice versa. There is also the factor that being new is hard anyplace, and of course everyone is going to seem cliquish when you've just left your own group of friends.

California isn't homogenous, either- there is a big north/south divide- we think they are superficial and they think we are snobbish.
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  #21  
Old 07-24-2005, 04:47 PM
Binarydrone Binarydrone is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manatee
Yeah, we are.

We know that it should be "from," not "than."
Of all the posts in this thread, I must say that this one in particular is the most informative and on topic. It sure gave me a lot to ponder.
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  #22  
Old 07-24-2005, 04:51 PM
Binarydrone Binarydrone is offline
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One other thing that I have noticed here is that everyone walks or drives at the exact wrong speed for me. Just enough slower than I want to go to be annoying, but fast enough to make getting around them a hassle. They also seem to get offended if you go around them for some reason.

I do think that people from the back east are more aggressive and rude. I personally like that, because I am used to it. I think that the drive is still there for the folks here, it just seems to take some sort of a underhanded form.
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  #23  
Old 07-24-2005, 09:44 PM
rbroome rbroome is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan B
I'm thinking of moving to San Diego. Every so often someone will say that they moved to California but didn't like it because of the people. I visited recently and the people didn't seem that different to me, but then again it was all limited to superficial chatting around tourist areas.

Is there anything to this? Should we be concerned that the people will be different and we might not get along? I'd be interested in hearing any stories from anyone who has moved in either direction, and found a difference or didn't find a difference.
I live in the South-New Orleans area, but grew up in N. Va. and went to grad school in Oregon and of course have visited both coasts on several occasions. So I can comment on both coasts equally-I don't live on either one.
East Coast: colder faster more driven people.
West Coast: more superficial less focused but busier and more personally interesting people.
Compared to folks in the South and Midwest, both coasts should be ashamed of their manners. Neither rates even a D from me. But YMMV.

Will and easterner get along in the west? I think so. There are *lots* of people on both coasts and you are equally likely to find people you like either place.
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  #24  
Old 07-24-2005, 10:08 PM
BobT BobT is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by even sven

California isn't homogenous, either- there is a big north/south divide- we think they are superficial and they think we are snobbish.

The California divide is more north/south/central.

Both the north and south think the central part of the state is occupied by redneck hicks who do tasks like "farming". Something that Southern Californians and coastal Northern Californians find bizarre.

Then there's the part of California near the Oregon border, which although sparsely populated, has people who are very much unlike any other part of the state.
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  #25  
Old 07-24-2005, 10:57 PM
even sven even sven is offline
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I'll agree that the far north and the deep Sierras a strange no man's land, but the folks in Saramento, Fresno, Bakersfield, etc. certainly know what side of the north/south divide they are on.
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  #26  
Old 07-24-2005, 11:31 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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The wrong one?
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  #27  
Old 07-24-2005, 11:47 PM
Manatee Manatee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Binarydrone
Of all the posts in this thread, I must say that this one in particular is the most informative and on topic. It sure gave me a lot to ponder.
Hey, I try to help. Thank you for your sincere compliment; it really made my day.
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  #28  
Old 07-25-2005, 12:08 AM
Plan B Plan B is offline
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Originally Posted by Hunter Hawk
What Binarydrone said. There's a saying that if you move to Seattle from the East Coast, you'd better bring your friends with you, 'cuz you're not gonna make any new ones.
Funny that you should mention that. Several years ago I had to go to Seattle to work for a weekend. I was working with a group of local people who knew each other pretty well since they'd been working together for a long time. I was the only outsider. Anyway, they needed to have some informal meetings for the local group so they decided that Saturday and Sunday at lunchtime would be a great time for their local meetings. So when it was time to go to lunch both days, they went off by themselves and I was left to fend for myself. I was invited back a few months later by someone who had been there and totally forgotten about the above event. He assured me that they're a great group and this is a great way to get to know them. I declined.

Maybe that's why I'm considering San Diego, not Seattle.
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  #29  
Old 07-25-2005, 12:59 AM
Campion Campion is offline
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Originally Posted by Manatee
Hey, I try to help. Thank you for your sincere compliment; it really made my day.
I'm getting a little weepy at the love, here.

Speaking as a native Californian who's spent significant time outside this lovely state, I think people have hit it spot on. I've generally found better manners in the midwest and south (although there's always the exception that proves the rule, Johnny L.A.). I've found poor manners on the coasts, but while the east coast tends to be deliberate when they're rude, the west coast just tends to be thoughtless. I've had doors slammed in my face, and on the east coast, I know they meant it personally. Here, the person in front of me looked, saw me behind him/her, and just let the door shut anyway. Total obliviousness.

Having said that, I think it's wonderful here. I'd live in the midwest (well, certain parts of it), the south (ditto), and the west, but I don't think I'd ever move east.

But that's why they made the country so big -- different places for different folk.
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  #30  
Old 07-25-2005, 04:02 AM
Large Marge Large Marge is offline
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I do believe West Coast people stand in line, while East Coast people stand on line.
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  #31  
Old 07-25-2005, 10:08 AM
Agrippina Agrippina is offline
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I have found that in the Midwest people seem to go out of their way to be friendly, polite, and charming. But as soon as your back is turned, out comes the gossip and trash talking.
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  #32  
Old 07-25-2005, 10:36 AM
Hello Again Hello Again is offline
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I grew up in NYC, went to college on the Southern Virginia coast, worked for many years in the northern Midwest and now live in rural Central Virginia. My brother and parents live in San Francisco. These, obviously, are my observations. You will find good and bad in every listing. I have no data set for Southern California, Southwest, Central Midwest, Deep South, and Pacific Northwest.

ome Observations:

Northern East Coasters
The Good: generally have a "live and let live" attitude towards other people. Not nosy. Leaving other people alone (not meddling) is considered a positive value. Being direct is considered a positive value. More likely to have experienced many cultures, including international travel.
The Bad: Regional provincialism, less likely to have experienced non-urban life in America. Most likely to say offensively provincial things to people from other regions (so, do you have flush toilets in Iowa?) Usually wound kind of tight.

Southern East Coasters
The Good: Go out of their way to help strangers. Usually curious in a friendly way about other cultures and religions. More family oriented (more family reunions, more likely to live near family, etc.)
The Bad: Being direct is a negative value -- resulting in backstabbing, gossiping. High awareness of "social obligations" and high social cost for not upholding them to community standards. Less exposed to a variety of world cultures. Most likely to be confused when someone says "I'm Jewish/Hindu/Buddhist."

Midwesterners
The Good: More likely to have traveled by car to lots of places in the US, including major cities... most exposed to different lifeways within the US. Friendly without expecting anything in return. Least concerned with social status.
The Bad: Most likely to not live anywhere other than their home state or region in their lifetime. Worst, most bland cooking. Most likely to do something "because that's how we've always done it." Most likely to try and make things go away by ignoring them. Not "imposing" is a positive value -- leads to people being unwilling to ask for help.

Northern Californians
The Good: Most likely to be "not from around here" and most understanding of someone without a social support structure (a concept that truly befuddles Southerners and Midwesterners). Most likely to form "family substitute" peer groups through work or activities. Most likely to have experienced many world cultures.
The Bad: Most likely to have tin-foil hat theories about life. Most likely to look down on people not as "open-minded" as they (v. ironic!). Most likely to have lots of principles they talk about but never act on.
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  #33  
Old 07-25-2005, 11:10 AM
drachillix drachillix is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by even sven
I'll agree that the far north and the deep Sierras a strange no man's land, but the folks in Sacramento, Fresno, Bakersfield, etc. certainly know what side of the north/south divide they are on.
IIRC the official CA Mason-Dixon Line runs east and west through Six Flags Magic Mountain.
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  #34  
Old 07-25-2005, 11:33 AM
scout1222 scout1222 is offline
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Not too many people are talking about San Diego specifically, so I'll chime in on that, having lived here since 1991.

San Diego is a pretty transitory town. Mostly because of the military, I'm guessing. If you asked people where they are from, there's a big chance they were born somewhere else. Not too many people have lived here all their life. I grew up in LA, and that's certainly a place people move TO, I just didn't get that same feeling about LA. I'm not sure if it's just anecdotal and coincidental, or what.

Anyway, the point I'm making is that you'll probably find people with East Coast sensibilities (whatever that is) and West Coast sensibilities here, because people are from all over.

If you're not worried about the cost of living, I'd say go for it. I love it here.
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  #35  
Old 07-25-2005, 12:15 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Large Marge
I do believe West Coast people stand in line, while East Coast people stand on line.
The East Coast doesn't equal NY state, which is the only place that I know of that says on line instead of in line. For some reason I get the feeling that many of the people in this thread are say they are talking about the East Coast but really are speaking only about NYC...

That said, everything Hello Again pretty much applies to the North East, except a lot of the north east is rural too - a fair number of people could tell you very definitively if they prefer living in the city or country, because they've lived in both.
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  #36  
Old 07-25-2005, 12:28 PM
Troy McClure SF Troy McClure SF is offline
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Originally Posted by Hello Again
Most likely to look down on people not as "open-minded" as they (v. ironic!).
Oh good, I see you've visited Santa Cruz. (Hey, I love the town, but man, it's mind-boggling the way some of the "tolerant, open-minded people" can be so hateful and close-minded in the name of tolerance and open-mindedness.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by drachillix
IIRC the official CA Mason-Dixon Line runs east and west through Six Flags Magic Mountain.
I dunno about that one... Lumping in Bakersfield and San Francisco together? I-5 between Stockton and the Grapevine, and anywhere that can be seen from it, should be its own faction.

Then again, we SF natives never want to admit we have anything to do with anything farther than Berkeley.
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  #37  
Old 07-25-2005, 01:05 PM
Beware of Doug Beware of Doug is offline
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Originally Posted by Hunter Hawk
What Binarydrone said. There's a saying that if you move to Seattle from the East Coast, you'd better bring your friends with you, 'cuz you're not gonna make any new ones. I've also found that's it's curiously easy to drop out of contact with friends I've made here.

There also seems to be an odd lack of spontaneity in people--anything you want to do, you have to plan three weeks in advance. And if you're planning a party, for example, you need to invite about three times the number of people you want to actually show up.
I could say the same about the NYC area, although I will admit that other people seem to have an easier time forming little groups and things than I do. (Then again, I'm about 20 miles out of NYC, and often don't get thought of when little get togethers are planned.)

Why do you suppose Seattleites are particularly slow to make new friends? How about Portlanders? Vancouverites?
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  #38  
Old 07-25-2005, 03:50 PM
drachillix drachillix is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Troy McClure SF
Oh good, I see you've visited Santa Cruz. (Hey, I love the town, but man, it's mind-boggling the way some of the "tolerant, open-minded people" can be so hateful and close-minded in the name of tolerance and open-mindedness.)
I spent some time there myself being from Watsonville (bout 15mi south of SC). SC might as well be a different planet for most intents and purposes.

Quote:
I dunno about that one... Lumping in Bakersfield and San Francisco together? I-5 between Stockton and the Grapevine, and anywhere that can be seen from it, should be its own faction.
I agree but we all gotta stick together. Combined we can strangle their economy single handed. We have the water, the oil, and the food. SF Bay area for finance, tech and manufactuing, the north SHALL BE victorious again.
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  #39  
Old 07-25-2005, 04:28 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drachillix
I agree but we all gotta stick together. Combined we can strangle their economy single handed. We have the water, the oil, and the food. SF Bay area for finance, tech and manufactuing, the north SHALL BE victorious again.
HAH! If we don't let the migrant workers thru, all your lettuce goes unpicked. We'll put them to work in the Imperial Valley.

You might have some resources and tech, but you also have all of the government. That alone will tip the scales in favor of the sunny South.

What can I say? I get the bends if I go north of Santa Barbara.
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  #40  
Old 07-25-2005, 04:31 PM
scout1222 scout1222 is offline
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Plan B, as you can see there's a bit of North/South rivalry in CA. I can't say it's one of my most favorite things about the state, but mostly I don't pay it much mind.
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Old 07-25-2005, 05:17 PM
gfloyd gfloyd is offline
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I moved from Boston to Davis (near Sacramento) about a month ago. The people here seem much nicer than the people back east. I really hear a horn honk or someone swearing at a stranger. The driving is different. Everyone here drives faster and closer together than back home, but they'll let you merge far more willingly. I've spent some time in San Diego as well, and found the same thing. People out here are easier to deal with.
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  #42  
Old 07-25-2005, 05:45 PM
DiosaBellissima DiosaBellissima is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drachillix
IIRC the official CA Mason-Dixon Line runs east and west through Six Flags Magic Mountain.
Not true at all, we Bakersfieldians consider ourselves "Nothern-Southern Californians". The reasoning being that we are a lot closer to Los Angeles (hour or so) then any of the big, northern cities (about 3 hours from San Fran...a good 5 or 6 from Sacramento). Plus, when Disneyland has their "Southern Californians Only" stuff, we are included. I'd say the line is somewhere abouts Fresno, maybe a lil north of it?

I've traveled to a few places on the East Coast and hated it. Why? The people were so grumpy. Very few smiles, very few casual convos, etc. Everyone seemed rushed, pushy, and yelly. I think it is because they don't have sunshine- a key ingredient in happiness .

I also had a friend from Brooklyn that I knew from debate. After attending a debate tournament at Stanford he told me, "Dude, what the hell is wrong with you people? Everyone is so relaxed! And nice! IT'S NOT NORMAL!!!!!"
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Old 07-25-2005, 07:43 PM
Plan B Plan B is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scout1222
Plan B, as you can see there's a bit of North/South rivalry in CA. I can't say it's one of my most favorite things about the state, but mostly I don't pay it much mind.

I love it. Can't wait to get involved. As soon as I buy my Padres hat, I'm on board, dissing them northerners with absolutley no knowledge base to go on.

BTW, had a great business call today with someone in SD in my field, discussing work possibilities. If this continues, I'll actually be able to make a living there.
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Old 07-25-2005, 07:55 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Then you can rejoice in the fact that Petco Park is not only the newest field in MLB, but the nicest. Beautifully laid out, shuttles and trolleys all of 100 yards away, the Gaslamp District right next door, Friar Franks, etc.

Just remember...to be a true Southern Californian, all you need to know how to say is "Giants suck!"
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Old 07-25-2005, 08:24 PM
Bearflag70 Bearflag70 is offline
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I consider the northern border of San Luis Obispo, Kern, and San Bernadino counties to be SoCal/NorCal divide.

If you want to include a Central area, I would say LA County to Mexico is SoCal, Ventrua County to Monterey County is Central, and everything else is NorCal.

Also, don't forget that in addition to a NorCal-SoCal cultural divide, we have an EastCal-WestCal subdivision of Norcal. From the Pacific to the Coastal Range is BlueCal except for a blue bulge that encompasses Sacramento. Everything east of that is RedCal.
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Old 07-25-2005, 08:30 PM
rexnervous rexnervous is offline
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I grew up (w/ exception of a few years - 3rd - 6th grade in LA) on the east coast, suburbs of DC.

Around 1996, moved to Bend, OR.

Then in late 2000, was job-transferred to West Hartford, CT.

I've always felt that the east coast was very rat-race. Life in OR seemed so much ... easier, or relaxed.

But that could also be small-town vs. city. Or I've fallen prey to the meme that the east coast is a dog-eat-dog world.

But I miss OR.
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Old 07-25-2005, 09:57 PM
Plan B Plan B is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus
Just remember...to be a true Southern Californian, all you need to know how to say is "Giants suck!"
I was born in NYC before the Giants left town. My dad was a serious Yankees fan and so I was also. So that's kind of like second nature to me.
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Old 07-25-2005, 10:33 PM
Kyla Kyla is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus
Just remember...to be a true Southern Californian, all you need to know how to say is "Giants suck!"
Don't forget your beachball, doing the wave, arriving in the third and leaving in the seventh (TRAFFIC!!!), and talking on your cell phone. Baseball, Southern California style. Awww, yeah.
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  #49  
Old 07-25-2005, 11:00 PM
randomlyblanks randomlyblanks is offline
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Well I'm from Pittsburgh and we generally consider ourselves to be in the Midwest more than East Coasters. We're nothing like NYC, Boston, DC, or even Philadelphia. We pretty much consider those cities to be much more fast-paced, uptight and single-minded than us. I've visited all of the large east coast cities and for the most part, the impression I get is similar. I found New Yorkers to be much more polite and present than I expected, but on the whole they didn't really compare to midwesterners.

To give an example, in NYC I found that walking into most stores (in tourist areas or not) the vendors were focused on either hawking their stuff whether you needed/wanted it or not. I found that most store keepers weren't exactly outgoing with their customers either. To contrast, in Pittsburgh I was looking for a certain type of ribbon to use for an honors society initiation. In desperation I went into a candy store thinking they might have some that they would be willing to sell. The shopkeeper's response? "Hmm, we don't carry anything like that, but I know a store downtown that does. Let me know what you need and I'll get it tomorrow before I open. I'll charge you whatever I pay downtown. Sound good?" Probably not a representative example, but in Pittsburgh we pride ourselves on being polite and courteous, especially to tourists.

In visiting the West Coast the most noticeable thing I found was that people are absolutely OBSESSED with the weather (and most of the posts to this thread by West Coasters agrees). I mean native Californians could barely understand that I gladly choose to live where I do--I've received a million comments about how dreary the weather is, how hard it must be to survive winters, don't I wish I lived in perpetual sunshine, etc. We realize we don't have an ideal climate, but jeez, there's plenty to love about living in the Midwest. I love seasons! In the West Coast I also found people to be extremely concerned about either health food or just plain fancy food. A juice bar on every corner was pretty surprising to a guy from a city where french fries appear both on sandwiches and in salads. What is this "wheatgrass shot" you speak of? I can't say I found people on the West Coast to be any less uptight than East Coasters, but they did seem to be plenty more friendly.

Just MHO. (PS. Come visit Pittsburgh! You'll be pleasantly surprised. PNC Park easily beats Petco, no offense. The team may suck, but even ESPN agrees
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  #50  
Old 07-25-2005, 11:09 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poogas21
Just MHO. (PS. Come visit Pittsburgh! You'll be pleasantly surprised. PNC Park easily beats Petco, no offense. The team may suck, but even ESPN agrees
Nice try, and I applaud the support for the home team, but....that ranking was from 2003. Petco just opened this year. I totally agree with ESPN's ranking of Qualcomm. That place is a dump.
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