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  #1  
Old 11-18-2005, 09:32 PM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
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What Tennessee tree fruit is size grapefruit, green, aromatic, bumpy?

What tree fruit in Tennessee is about the size of a grapefruit, green, aromatic, and extremely bumpy? My aunt brought some up to Wisconsin years ago after a family visit. The fruits are used for keeping varmits out of the drawer and closets according to her. It's very hard also.
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  #2  
Old 11-18-2005, 09:32 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
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Osage Orange
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  #3  
Old 11-18-2005, 09:33 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
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Old 11-18-2005, 09:35 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
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Heh. My first simul-answer!
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  #5  
Old 11-18-2005, 09:46 PM
CurtC CurtC is offline
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Aren't those fruit pretty universally called "horse apples"? In my experience in Texas, they are. The trees that produce them, at least around here, are called Bois d'Arc, pronounced BO-dark. The name comes from French, and indicates how the wood is especially good for making bows. The trees are indigenous to Texas and are very common here.
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  #6  
Old 11-18-2005, 10:12 PM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
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Osage Orange is the name. Thanks people.

They don't grow up here and Horse Apples around here are what people refer to when they point out crab apples in a pasture or wormy tree falls. The crab apples that people canned, not the decorative yard tree.
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  #7  
Old 11-18-2005, 10:19 PM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
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I'm reminded why I don't walk in black walnut woods in the fall. I found if you want to walk a trail on a breezy fall day, you should avoid an oak woods also, unless you wear a thick stocking cap.
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  #8  
Old 11-18-2005, 10:24 PM
Zabali_Clawbane Zabali_Clawbane is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CurtC
Aren't those fruit pretty universally called "horse apples"? In my experience in Texas, they are. The trees that produce them, at least around here, are called Bois d'Arc, pronounced BO-dark. The name comes from French, and indicates how the wood is especially good for making bows. The trees are indigenous to Texas and are very common here.

I'm not sure how many places this is true in, but horse apple is a euphimisim for equine feces that I heard growing up. They are used by Kansas farmer for windbreaks. They're inedible, and if you get the sap from them on your clothes it's difficult to impossible to get out again. They are known as hedge apples here.
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  #9  
Old 11-18-2005, 10:27 PM
Zabali_Clawbane Zabali_Clawbane is offline
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Strike that, I was thinking of ground apples. My apologies.
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  #10  
Old 11-18-2005, 10:49 PM
Electronic Chaos Electronic Chaos is offline
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I've always just called them tennis balls.
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Old 11-18-2005, 11:11 PM
Spavined Gelding Spavined Gelding is offline
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I donít know about bows and arrows, but the Hedge Apple Tree makes into dandy rot resistant fence posts and the live plant makes good pig tight and cow high field hedges.
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  #12  
Old 11-18-2005, 11:14 PM
Zabali_Clawbane Zabali_Clawbane is offline
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It's not mentioned in the articles I've read, but they are also used as windbreaks to prevent soil erosion due to their thorniness.
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  #13  
Old 11-18-2005, 11:33 PM
lorinada lorinada is offline
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The Bois d'arc and the Osage orange tree are the same thing. The fruits are often called horse apples because horses are fond of eating them.
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  #14  
Old 11-19-2005, 12:50 AM
lissener lissener is online now
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As a kid in Texas, I remember them being called Horse Apples too; never once heard them referred to as Osage Oranges. Not saying that's not what they are; only that regionally they are very definitely referred to as Horse Apples.
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  #15  
Old 11-19-2005, 01:33 AM
Oregon sunshine Oregon sunshine is offline
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My dad makes Stone Age style arrows and bows and he says that the best wood for bows comes from the osage orange tree.
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  #16  
Old 11-19-2005, 05:59 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harmonious Discord
Osage Orange is the name. Thanks people.

They don't grow up here
Yes, they do grow in Wisconsin. At least in the southern region. I've seen 'em.

Of course, they may have been planted by farmers rather than wandering in on their own.
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  #17  
Old 11-19-2005, 06:52 AM
Squink Squink is offline
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Originally Posted by Broomstick
Of course, they may have been planted by farmers rather than wandering in on their own.
Originally native to Arkansas, Texas, and Oklahoma, the tree is now found in most states; perhaps due to the efforts of an unsung American hero, Johnny Horseappleseed.
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  #18  
Old 11-19-2005, 06:59 AM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
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The pecan also grows up here, but there's only a small number. I 'm sure I'll never see them. In the 70's Organic Gardening collected pecans from a few hardy northern trees and they were planted to hopefully grow northern hardy trees. People were sold the pecans for planting trees in northern climates. We have hickory all over, and in the transitional zones you get hicans which is a cross. I have known the locations of two butternut trees , but have no idea if either exist anymore.

Sometime in the early 80's a groove of American Chestnuts were found by La Crosse Wisconsin in the bluff heights. The 90 acre grove had survived by it's isolation. The nuts where supposed to be used to reestablish the decimated species. I see that the trees are now infected since people started going there.

http://www2.vscc.cc.tn.us/jschibig/bigchestnuts.htm
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  #19  
Old 11-19-2005, 07:06 AM
A.R. Cane A.R. Cane is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zabali_Clawbane
Strike that, I was thinking of ground apples. My apologies.
I always heard it as "road apples". Road apples and cow pies.
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  #20  
Old 11-19-2005, 10:21 AM
vetbridge vetbridge is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lissener
As a kid in Texas, I remember them being called Horse Apples too; never once heard them referred to as Osage Oranges. Not saying that's not what they are; only that regionally they are very definitely referred to as Horse Apples.
As a kid growing up in Pennsylvania, we called them "monkey balls".
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  #21  
Old 11-20-2005, 12:02 PM
DSYoungEsq DSYoungEsq is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vetbridge
As a kid growing up in Pennsylvania, we called them "monkey balls".
Monkey Balls are kiwi fruit.
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  #22  
Old 11-20-2005, 01:03 PM
Ruken Ruken is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vetbridge
As a kid growing up in Pennsylvania, we called them "monkey balls".
In PA and NJ I heard them called "monkey brains". I'm pretty sure we also called them Osage Oranges.
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  #23  
Old 11-20-2005, 04:35 PM
Kiminy Kiminy is offline
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A common term for osage oranges here in Kentucky is spider ball, because of their reputation for keeping spiders (and other insects) away. We tried it in our basement, but the fruit just rotted.
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  #24  
Old 11-20-2005, 08:44 PM
Sigene Sigene is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ggurl
My dad makes Stone Age style arrows and bows and he says that the best wood for bows comes from the osage orange tree.

I've got a chunk of a tree in my basement right now just for that purpose. I cut it down about 12 years ago. I've left the bark on, and painted the ends to help reduce the splitting as it dries. Don't know when I'll get around to making a bow, but if I don't, I'll be happy to let someone skilled in the art have a crack at it.
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